Mohammed Quayyum Khan aka 'Q'

Five life sentences, two acquittals: Peering deeper into the Crevice 7/07 case.

Mohammed Quayyum Khan aka 'Q'

The Antagonist
Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

09 May 2007, 23:47 #1

May 8, 2007
Explosive Revelations in UK 'Fertilizer Plot'
by Loretta Napoleoni


The true story of the foiled "fertilizer plot," in which Muslim radicals planned to bomb a shopping center and a famous London nightclub using over a half ton of ammonium nitrate, has finally emerged. The jihadist cell in Crawley, a small town south of London, was dismantled thanks to the largest British counter-terrorism effort to that point: 36,000 man-hours of surveillance on both coasts of the Atlantic and in Pakistan and hundreds of reconnaissance missions led to the arrest and conviction of the thwarted bombers. This operation, code-named Crevice, should have been a feather in the cap of the MI5, but instead it risks throwing the Blair government into crisis as it unveils more lies fed to a credulous public.

In the face of alarming news from the trial records of this case, Britons are asking two agonizing questions. First, why, in the aftermath of the suicide bombings of July 7, 2005, did the government declare that the 7/7 bombers had "clean skin" when two of them had come to the MI5’s attention at least three times during Operation Crevice? And why did the special services let them escape the surveillance net without alerting the police in the city where they resided?

As if this were not enough, from the court records it has emerged that a mysterious individual of Pakistani origin known as "Q," who would come to be identified as Mohammed Quayyum Khan, recruited both cells’ heads. Mohammed Sidique Khan, leader of the 7/7 suicide mission, and Omar Khyam, the brains behind the fertilizer plot. Even more disconcerting is the revelation that Q is still on the loose, even though he only vanished just before the court’s verdict. The MI5 claims that there is no evidence to indict Q, therefore he cannot be arrested. But habeas corpus has been abolished in Tony Blair’s England, and the police have almost unlimited powers when it comes to "suspected terrorists." Hundreds of Muslims are sitting in British jails awaiting formal charges against them; why is Q not one of them?

The uncomfortable questions don’t end there. Why wasn't Q included on the the blacklists of al-Qaeda financiers? The trial transcripts confirm that one of his skills was securing funds and materiel [sic] for bombings. Mere suspicion of involvement is normally enough to land one on the lists, making it difficult to vanish, because access to funds is barred. Credit cards, debit cards, checks, bank accounts – all are frozen.

The press has proffered the hypothesis – neither confirmed nor denied by the special services – that Q was a "Deep Throat" similar to Mohammed Junaid Babar, also part of the fertilizer plot, who became an FBI informer after he was arrested in 2004. Babar – who is also free, thanks to the immunity granted him by the American authorities – revealed to the court that the heads of the two cells were identified in the spring of 2003 as they trained in the same jihadist camp in Pakistan. There they would have learned terror techniques, including how to use explosives and how to compartmentalize their cells. Babar also identified Q and established a link between the UK cells and al-Qaeda in Pakistan. Both Babar and Q were followers of Omar Bakri Muhammad, a charismatic preacher who lived in England for almost 20 years. Muhammad, the head of al-Muhajiroun, a very popular group among Pakistani immigrants to Britain, fled the law in 2005 by moving to Lebanon, where he continues to grant inflammatory interviews to the British press. Al-Muhajiroun was looked upon favorably by the British authorities in the 1980s for supporting the mujahedeen in Afghanistan. It was only in the 1990s that they entered al-Qaeda's orbit. The Pakistani trail that came to light after the 7/7 attacks is back in the news, as are questions about the mysterious relationship between the two countries.

In the wake of the new revelations, the survivors and the families of the victims of the 7/7 bombings are calling for a public inquiry into the government's handling of the two plots. If Q was an informer, why not say so? Or does the hawkish and intransigent Blair fear having to admit that even he is willing to negotiate with the enemy? More damning is the notion that two of the 7/7 bombers were left loose because, as the MI5 maintains, the government lacks the resources to properly survey the jihadist cosmos. If this is indeed the problem, then why spend money and sacrifice human life to "export democracy" overseas when the government cannot protect the citizens at home?
Source: AntiWar.com. Loretta Napoleoni's site is here.
"The problem with always being a conformist is that when you try to change the system from within, it's not you who changes the system; it's the system that will eventually change you." -- Immortal Technique

"The media is the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power. Because they control the minds of the masses." -- Malcolm X

"The eternal fight is not many battles fought on one level, but one great battle fought on many different levels." -- The Antagonist

"Truth does not fear investigation." -- Unknown
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amirrortotheenemy
Joined: 06 Nov 2006, 17:39

10 May 2007, 15:05 #2

Terror suspect unveiled in trial

BY CLIVE GRESSWELL

Old Bailey hears about Luton-based link to bombers
The man alleged to be the link between the leaders of the fertiliser bomb plot and the July 7 attacks has been living and working in Luton.


Mohammed Quayyum Khan - known as Q

The identity of Mohammed Quayyum Khan, known as Q, was revealed at the Old Bailey fertiliser bomb trial.

Members of Luton's Muslim community have now called for the security services to act against Q, alleged to be one of al Qaeda's leaders in Britain.

Mohammed Bashir, chairman of Asian group Khidmat, said Mr Quayyum Khan was well known as a member of a group which had tried to disrupt local elections.

He said: "The police know him very well. Of course the intelligence service know him very well. The intelligence service knows all about these guys as individuals." Mohammed Sulaiman, a past president of Luton Central Mosque said: "Police know everything about it. It's up to them, they know. I say the police know everything about him so what is going on?" Sources told this newspaper that taxi-driver Q used to work at Nibbles* takeaway in Market Hill in the town centre.

On Wednesday Staff there said they had never heard of him.


It is believed he has gone into hiding since the blaze of publicity surrounding his alleged role revealed in the court case.

Among the allegations against Q - who is in his 40s and married with several children - during the year-long trial were that he was:

The emir, or leader, of the fertiliser bomb plot.

Instrumental in arranging for 7/7 bomber Mohammed Sidique Khan to travel to Pakistan, where he attended a terrorism training camp.

A provider of funds and equipment for Jihadi militants fighting American forces in Afghanistan.

The counter-terrorism operation against the fertiliser bomb gang, known as Operation Crevice, is believed to have started with an M15 investigation into Q in 2003.

But despite the number of serious allegations made at the Old Bailey he has never been arrested or charged.

A spokesman for the antiterrorist squad said: "We are not prepared to discuss any individuals and any decision to make an arrest is based on information available." Q has previously denied being involved in terrorism saying he was trying to launch a charity to help poor people in Pakistan but it never came off.

In an earlier interview with The Daily Telegraph he said: "I don't believe in bombing."

Source
*Where Newsnight had attempted to interview him.
"No one understood better than Stalin that the true object of propaganda is neither to convince nor even to persuade, but to produce a uniform pattern of public utterance in which the first trace of unorthodox thought immediately reveals itself as a jarring dissonance." Leonard Schapiro
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amirrortotheenemy
Joined: 06 Nov 2006, 17:39

12 May 2007, 15:28 #3

Qayum Khan shares a postcode with the Imran Khan below, a relative perhaps?
Last Updated: Thursday, 22 March 2007, 14:58 GMT

Taxi speeding cheats face action
Police have started a clampdown on taxi drivers and other motorists who try to get off speeding charges by lying.

The move comes after a judge warned taxi drivers in Luton they faced longer prison sentences if they continued to try to avoid speed camera convictions.

Figures show the vast majority of local motorists being investigated or convicted for perverting the course of justice are taxi drivers.

Bedfordshire Police has appointed Pc Sean Quinn to investigate.

Judge Michael Kay QC heard on Thursday that of 141 speeding cases involving perverting the course of justice, either prosecuted or in the pipeline, 134 involved taxi drivers.

Pc Quinn will work solely on cases of perverting the course of justice.

The judge's warning came as Imran Khan, 25, of Stratford Road, Luton, appeared before him after pleading guilty to perverting the course of justice.

He was jailed for 14 days and banned from driving for six months.


Pc Quinn said such convictions and driving bans meant taxi drivers could lose their livelihoods.

Source
Last Updated: Thursday, 19 April 2007, 16:45 GMT 17:45 UK

Judge condemns taxi speeding lies
A judge has condemned taxi drivers in Luton after a cabbie was jailed for lying over a speeding ticket.

At Luton Crown Court, Ayaz Asghar, 32, pleaded guilty to perverting the course of justice and speeding.

Asghar of Broadmead, Luton, Bedfordshire, was jailed for 21 days and banned from driving for six months.

Judge Michael Kay QC said: "There is clearly a local view that one can escape prosecution and escape penalty points if caught driving too fast. "

Judge Kay said he had "lost count" of the number of taxi drivers he had jailed since police clamped down on drivers giving false details when being caught by speed cameras.

He added: "It beggars belief to suggest that taxi drivers are separately and spontaneously giving false details."

Martin Pinfold, prosecuting, said Asghar's taxi was caught by a mobile speed camera in Dunstable Road, Caddington, Bedfordshire on 10 February last year travelling at 43mph (69.1km/h) in a 30mph area.

A notice of prosecution was sent to his home, which he returned naming a Mr Khan from Stratford Road, Luton, as the driver.

When his lie was uncovered Asghar claimed a potential buyer had taken his cab for a test drive and continued to deny he had been the driver.

But he pleaded guilty to perverting the course of justice and speeding last month.


John McNally, mitigating said: "It was a most foolish mistake. He has lost his good character and probably his livelihood."

Earlier this year Judge Kay heard that of 141 speeding cases involving perverting the course of justice, either prosecuted or in the pipeline, 134 involved taxi drivers.

Source
"No one understood better than Stalin that the true object of propaganda is neither to convince nor even to persuade, but to produce a uniform pattern of public utterance in which the first trace of unorthodox thought immediately reveals itself as a jarring dissonance." Leonard Schapiro
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The Antagonist
Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

17 May 2007, 02:47 #4

UK: THREE TERROR SUSPECTS MISSING ON OUR STREETS
Wednesday May 2,2007
By Padraic Flanagan


THREE men accused of links with Al Qaeda and the Bluewater bomb plotters are on the loose in Britain, it emerged yesterday.

Mohammed Quayyam Khan, a part-time cab driver from Luton, was allegedly in contact with one of terror overlord Osama Bin Laden’s most senior lieutenants.

A second man, former London Underground worker Zeeshan Siddiqui, had planned to launch a suicide attack on the Tube, the Old Bailey was told.

And Islamic militant Sajeel Shahid, thought to be the leader of the banned group Al Muhajiroun in Pakistan, is alleged to have set up a training camp where 7/7 ringleader Mohammad Sidique Khan and Bluewater leader Omar Khyam learned bomb-making.

All three were named in the trial of five terrorists jailed on Monday for plotting to blow up the Bluewater shopping centre or the Ministry of Sound nightclub with a 1,300lb fertiliser bomb.

Quayyam, referred to as Q in court, was described as the link between the fertiliser bomb gang and Al Qaeda in Pakistan, arranging for 7/7 ringleader Khan to attend a training camp there in 2003.

Old Bailey jurors were told how Quayyam’s meeting with the fertiliser gang’s leader, Omar Khyam, 25, led MI5 to launch an investigation into the Bluewater plot.


Given the codename “Bashful Dwarf” by MI5 surveillance teams, Q was under observation during an investigation into money and equipment being supplied from Luton to Afghanistan. The court heard how Q arranged for both Khyam and Khan to be met at the airport when they flew to Pakistan for training.

Quayyam was said to take orders directly from Abdul Hadi Al-Iraqi, the Al Qaeda number three who was imprisoned in Guantanamo Bay last week.

Only weeks before the Bluewater plot was finalised, Khyam was allegedly seen with Q in Uxbridge, west London. Agents reported Q “leading the conversation and waving his arms around”.

Despite the allegations, Q has never been arrested, though his home has been raided at least once. Neighbours reported police tearing up floorboards and digging up the garden, though no charges were ever brought.

Q has now apparently disappeared but in an interview given before the end of the trial he said he met Khyam and Khan through charity work. He said: “I was trying to build a charity to help poor people in Pakistan but it never came to effect.”

He complained that he was being picked on because he was black and Muslim. He said: “I’m trying to be a good British citizen and I’m feeling now I’m getting done over.

“I know from my heart, if I had done something I would have been in the dock myself.”

Since police raided his home three years ago, he said he had lost his job and cannot rent a house.

Q, who is in his forties and is married with several children, is said to be a former associate of the fanatical clerics Abu Hamza and Omar Bakri Mohammed.

Old Bailey jurors heard that Siddiqui, another man with Al Qaeda connections, is also in Britain. He was meant to launch a suicide bomb attack on the Underground.

Siddiqui, raised in Hounslow, west London, was alleged to be a schoolfriend of Asif Hanif, who blew himself up in a suicide attack on a Tel Aviv nightclub in 2003.

He worked on the Tube and allegedly attended a training camp in Pakistan where Khyam was said to have asked him to stage a “martyrdom operation”.

Siddiqui was arrested in Pakistan in 2005 for alleged links to some of Al Qaeda’s most dangerous figures. He was released from jail in March last year and returned to Britain, where he has since disappeared.

Officers discovered a diary he had kept. In it, he questioned how fellow Muslims could live peacefully in London, which he described as the “vital organ of the minions of the devil”.

He claimed to have been tortured in jail and denied knowing any of the London bombers. He has not been questioned by police since his return to the UK.

It was also reported he had met another of the London bombers, Shehzad Tanweer.

Sajeel Shahid, from Barking, east London, is a key ally of Omar Bakri Mohammed. In 2005 he was expelled from Pakistan after spending three months in jail for his alleged support of Al Qaeda.

The involvement of Shahid has emerged amid mounting concern about the links to Pakistan of the 7/7 and Bluewater bombers, and the role played by the Al Muhajiroun fundamentalist group.

Source: http://www.express.co.uk/news/view/5970
"The problem with always being a conformist is that when you try to change the system from within, it's not you who changes the system; it's the system that will eventually change you." -- Immortal Technique

"The media is the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power. Because they control the minds of the masses." -- Malcolm X

"The eternal fight is not many battles fought on one level, but one great battle fought on many different levels." -- The Antagonist

"Truth does not fear investigation." -- Unknown
Reply

amirrortotheenemy
Joined: 06 Nov 2006, 17:39

12 Apr 2008, 00:09 #5

A trial exhibit in the case of Regina v Dhiren Barot et al is of handwritten notes made by the defendant Abdul Aziz Jalil of Luton and mentions a Qayum at the 'centre'

see link [© Metropolitan Police]
"No one understood better than Stalin that the true object of propaganda is neither to convince nor even to persuade, but to produce a uniform pattern of public utterance in which the first trace of unorthodox thought immediately reveals itself as a jarring dissonance." Leonard Schapiro
Reply

amirrortotheenemy
Joined: 06 Nov 2006, 17:39

12 Apr 2008, 13:18 #6

No sign of the man said to link plotters

By Duncan Gardham
Last Updated: 1:52am BST 02/05/2007

There was no sign yesterday of the man alleged to be the link between the leaders of the fertiliser bomb plot and the July 7 attacks.

Mohammed Quayam Khan has admitted that he knew both Omar Khyam and Mohammed Sidique Khan.

Known as "Q", he was said to have arranged for both men to be met at the airport as they arrived in Pakistan for training.
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The court was told "Q" had provided money and equipment to fighters and answered to al-Qa'eda's number three, Abdul Hadi al-Iraqi.

But yesterday there was no answer at Quayam Khan's home in Luton and no sign of him at the cafe where he works in the middle of town.

He was known as an associate of Omar Bakri Mohammed, who told The Daily Telegraph from his home in the Lebanon that he did not consider any of the fertiliser bombers to be "members" of his now disbanded group al-Muhajiroun.

"The man is too young to be jailed for life," he said, referring to Khyam. "Did he blow anything up, destroy anything or kill anybody?

"I consider the verdict part of a hidden conspiracy against Islam, against any Muslim who wants to practice his religion."

"Q" has claimed he knew Khyam and Sidique Khan through a charity he was trying to set up.

He has never been arrested and denies any involvement in the July 7 attacks.

He told The Daily Telegraph in an earlier interview: "I don't believe in bombing."

Telegraph
Bomb plotters' al-Qa'eda 'link' still in Britain

By Duncan Gardham
Last Updated: 1:41am BST 01/05/2007

The fixer

The man who allegedly was the link between al-Qa'eda and the fertiliser plot leaders and the July 7 bombers remains in Britain.

"Q", whose real name is Mohammed Quayam Khan, has never been arrested and lives in Luton.

In an interview with The Daily Telegraph, Quayam Khan said he had met Omar Khyam and Mohammed Sidique Khan through a charity he was trying to set up.

"I was trying to build a charity to help poor people in Pakistan but it never came to effect," he said

He complained that he could not rent a house and had lost his job since his home was raided by police three years ago.


"Just because I'm black, everyone's picking on me. Just because I'm a Muslim, everyone's picking on me. The way I see it, it's against Islam," he said.

"I'm trying to be a good British citizen and I'm feeling like now I'm getting done over. I know from myself, from my heart, if I had done something I would have been in the dock myself."

Given the codename "Bashful Dwarf," he was under observation by MI5 who were investigating the alleged supply of money and equipment from Luton to Afghanistan.

His meetings with Omar Khyam led agents to investigate the Crawley gang. It was said in court that "Q" arranged for both Khyam and Sidique Khan to be met at the airport in Pakistan as they prepared to go for training.


He was said by the informant Mohammed Babar to answer to Abdul Hadi al-Iraqi, the number three in al-Qa'eda, who was taken to Guantanamo Bay last week.

Just weeks before the fertiliser plot was finalised, Khyam was allegedly seen with "Q" in Uxbridge, west London.

MI5 agents said "Bashful Dwarf" was "leading the conversation and waving his arms around".

Also in this country is a man the court heard was supposed to launch a suicide attack on the London Underground.

Zeeshan Siddiqui, who went by the name "Imran", was raised in Hounslow.

It was claimed that he was a school friend of Asif Hanif, who blew himself up in a Tel Aviv nightclub in 2003.

He worked on the Tube and allegedly attended the training camp in Pakistan where Khyam was said to have asked him to launch a "martyrdom operation".

Siddiqui kept a diary which was found on his arrest in Pakistan in May 2005.

The court heard he questioned how fellow Muslims could live peacefully in London, which he called the "vital organ of the minions of the devil".

He was released in March last year and returned to Britain but has since disappeared.

Telegraph
From The Sunday Times
May 6, 2007
The jihadi house parties of hate
Britain’s terror network offered an easy target the security sevices missed, says Shiv Malik

The barbecue was in full swing. Young men spilt out onto the street from the modest garden in a north London suburb and the air was thick with Urdu and heavily accented English.

The invitation had been specific: no wives or girlfriends. The party was to raise funds for a jihadi training camp: “Make sure your pockets are full.”

The party, held four years ago within a few hundred yards of the Metropolitan police training centre in Hendon, helped to forge alliances among British Islamist radicals that were to be put to murderous effect.

By the end of the evening £3,500 had been raised for a camp at Malakand on the Afghan-Pakistan border.

Within weeks two of the most dangerous British-born jihadi terrorists — Mohammad Sidique Khan, leader of the 7/7 suicide bombers, and Omar Khyam, leader of the so-called Crevice gang — were learning to make bombs at Malakand.

Details of the party were disclosed this weekend by one of the guests, Hassan Butt, a former associate of the Islamist radicals who has turned against violence.

Butt’s account both illustrates the extent of the jihadist network in Britain and throws harsh new light on the failure of the British security services to catch Khan before his 7/7 operation in London in which 52 people died.

Butt reveals that after the jihadist barbecue he drove to Khan’s home near Leeds with another guest, Mohammed Junaid Babar, who would shortly become a supergrass. Babar’s testimony helped to secure the conviction last week of five members of the Crevice gang, who had planned to blow up — among other targets — the Bluewater shopping mall in Kent and the Ministry of Sound nightclub in London.

Although Babar describes the barbecue in his testimony, he does not refer to the drive north, nor to some of the guests named by Butt.

However, if this supergrass was an associate of both the Crevice plotters and the 7/7 leader, why were MI5 and the police unable to halt Khan’s conspiracy? And how could Charles Clarke, home secretary at the time, claim that Khan and his associates were “clean skins” unknown to the security services?

Butt — who was stabbed and beaten up near his home in Manchester last month after saying on American television that violence was a cancer in Islam — is prepared for further serious reprisals. He believes that the British authorities are only now waking up to the threat of the jihadist network in the UK. THE guests at the barbecue that evening in late April 2003 — held in the wake of the invasion of Iraq — included about 100 hardcore Islamists.

The host was a family man of 38 with four young children. He had hired catering staff to serve lamb kebabs and marinaded chicken breasts, while his brother, Tan, moved among the guests with an old Quality Street tin for donations. “People were dropping in whatever was in their hands — £20, £100, £200,” Butt said.

In the months leading up to the barbecue there had been friction between British jihadist groups. Their members had returned from training camps in Pakistan as hardened would-be terrorists; but their personal rivalries and ideological disputes divided the different factions.

The host was a long-standing activist of Al-Muhajiroun, the group set up by Sheikh Omar Bakri in 1996, and was experienced in settling disputes between warring egos. According to Butt, who at the time was also a leading member of Al-Muhajiroun, he wanted to show it was possible to cooperate. “It was a mix between a corporate bonding session and one of those mafia meetings where groups could air any beef between them,” Butt said.

The guest list included men who were later to become notorious. Among them, claims Butt, was Mohammed Quayyum Khan, a part-time taxi driver from Luton who is alleged to have sent Mohammad Sidique Khan to the Malakand training camp on behalf of Al-Qaeda.

Butt also recalls seeing an east London “crew” leader, Kazi Rahman chatting near the patio doors. Rahman, is serving nine years in prison for attempting to buy sub-machineguns.

Sitting on pillows and leaning against the wall of the sparsely decorated living room were other financiers and jihadists from Luton, Croydon, Hounslow and the home counties.

“The favourite topic of conversation was ‘where were you on September 11’ but people also came up to me during the evening and asked if I knew how to get training,” said Butt. “It was clear that people were making deals and forging links.”

Butt believes that many of those present that evening had followed a similar trajectory to his own. From flirting with political agitprop before 9/ll, they had travelled to Pakistan after the US invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 and had become hardened through contact with serious players in the jihadi world.

According to Butt, several hundred British radicals received weapons training and Islamist tutorials. Lacking central leadership, however, they splintered into cells, incapable of operating effectively on their own.

Babar, his fellow guest at the jihadist barbecue, played a key part in bringing these groups together before he became a supergrass.

An American citizen and at the time a member of Al-Muhajiroun, Babar is intriguing both as a jihadist and as a deserter from the cause. According to Butt, he had been regarded as a fat lay-about at home in New York.

“He was the black sheep. He was the only one of three children who never completed his degree and he lived in the basement of the family home, separated from the three floors above where the rest of his family lived.

“He told me once that he’d robbed a hot dog vendor to get enough money to escape from his parents. He was planning to run away to California but he didn’t get very far.”

Babar went to Pakistan, Butt said, to prove himself to his family. They came from the tribal areas of Pakistan — home to the terrorist training camps — and he was one of the few members of Al-Muhajiroun who could speak Pashto, the local language.

When Butt first met him in Pakistan he was still overweight — “a fat blob” — but his experiences there and in the Afghan war brought to light an unsuspected steeliness. He organised a training camp and is alleged to have taken orders directly from Al-Qaeda to plan a terrorist attack in Britain. BY April 2003, Babar was staying in the host’s home in north London, scene of the barbecue. As the party continued into the early hours, he became embroiled in a row with some members of Hizbut-Tahrir, an Islamist group widely infiltrated into British universities.

“They were itching to get the shisha [smoking pipe] out,” said Butt. Babar disagreed with smoking tobacco because he felt that it was “haram” (forbidden) in Islam. They backed down, but continued to taunt Babar and Butt had to restrain him.

Butt, who had borrowed his brother’s navy blue Audi TT to get to the party from his home in Manchester, decided it was time to head back north. Babar asked to be dropped off near Leeds.

“He told me that he was trying to fix up a marriage with some girl in Leeds, but he’d only just got married [to a supporter of Al-Muhajiroun in Pakistan] and by now I thought it was getting far too late for him to start stopping in at some future fiancée’s house,” said Butt.

At 3am they stopped to buy snacks at a petrol station. Babar showed a glimpse of his old weakness. “A normal person would buy one drink, one pack of crisps and one chocolate. He’d [ask for] five of everything. Maybe it’s a New York thing.”

Back in the car Babar began to confide details of a plot to murder President Musharraf of Pakistan. “He [was] getting a hit squad together...to have Musharraf killed,” said Butt.

As the sun rose, Babar directed Butt to a terrace house in Batley, West Yorkshire, 15 minutes from the M1. A man in pyjamas came out to greet them. It was Mohammad Sidique Khan.

Butt had met Khan before. Babar had introduced them in 2002 at a gathering at Butt’s flat in Islamabad. Khan now recognised Butt and asked him if he wanted to come in.

“I was tired so I really didn’t want to go in but he kept insisting,” said Butt. They were shown into the front room. “The way Junaid [Babar] sat there, he looked very comfortable,” said Butt, who believes the two men knew each other well.

Khan’s small house was sparsely decorated with just a few large cushions and a rug to adorn the front room. Khan offered Butt something to drink and the three got talking.

“I was there for no more than 20 minutes and I remember talking about Iraq and Afghanistan; how the Americans couldn’t find Bin Laden and Mullah Omar and how Allah protects people who are sincere and that was it,” said Butt.

He expressed surprise that the security services, once Babar had turned supergrass, did not find out more from him about Khan that could have prevented the 7/7 bombings in London.

The FBI, which had been tracking Babar since he gave a hate-filled television interview to a western network in Pakistan in late 2001, arrested him when he flew home to America early in 2004. Faced with possibly spending the rest of his life in jail, he agreed to turn against his friends. He spent a week being debriefed and later pleaded guilty to five counts of providing material support to terrorists.

His evidence against some of his former associates in Britain’s biggest terrorist trial — named after Crevice, the police operation that cracked the conspiracy — helped last week to condemn them to a lifetime behind bars.

Why then did Mohammad Sidique Khan remain free to kill?

Butt believes the answer lies in short-sightedness: “The security services were so engrossed in Crevice and other southern plots that they didn’t take anyone from up north seriously, because at that time there was no one up north who was being arrested.”

He also questions what the security services were doing between mid2004 and 2005. “After Crevice, who were they actually tracking if not Khan? Crevice ended in March 2004, so what happened after that? Was everyone on holiday for the next year?

“They [the security services] have to realise that everyone they put under surveillance is a potential bomber if they have the links because very few radicals are going to work as individuals.”

Source
"No one understood better than Stalin that the true object of propaganda is neither to convince nor even to persuade, but to produce a uniform pattern of public utterance in which the first trace of unorthodox thought immediately reveals itself as a jarring dissonance." Leonard Schapiro
Reply

amirrortotheenemy
Joined: 06 Nov 2006, 17:39

13 May 2009, 21:25 #7

Source

[20] Babar described his understanding of the organizational relationships individuals he was dealing with had. Khyam worked for a man named Q who lived in Luton, near London. Q and Abdul Waheed had ties to al Qa’eda, respectively. Salahuddin Amin also worked under Q insofar as U.K. matters were concerned, but under Abu Munthir as concerned Pakistani operations. Munthir was a leader in Pakistan, who responded to al Qa’eda higher-up, Sheikh Abdul Hadi. I have tried to avoid getting lost in the welter of names that filled the prosecution evidence with too little organizational explanation as the case went in. In any case, apart from his actual dealings with individuals, there is no direct evidence that Momin Khawaja knew who all these people were or how they related to others.

Provision of a Residence in Rawalpindi and of Money
[25] There was evidence that to support Babar, Khyam and the ‘bros’ in their jihadist efforts, Momin Khawaja provided money [in addition to the currency he handed over to Amin, referred to already] and made available a residence owned by his parents in Rawalpindi. Khawaja told Zeba Khan “My parents have a house in Pakistan, which they have given to me, and i let my foreign bros. use it, but since bros have a tendency to move around like jack-rabbits, i’vc got tenant-issues on my growing list of headaches…I’ve gotta find bros. who can stay put and at least take care of the house.”  [exhibit 63, page 19]

[26] Just before his trip to Pakistan and the training camp in July 2003 he emailed Babar, saying

The house is ready, you must contact the person in pindi NOW, his name is Arif  Butt, call him right away:  area code: 51 number: 4845682 . Someone has to move into the house right away, or else we will loose this chance. Bro, i am arriving on july 15 so I need to know how to meet/contact you.

[27] Babar discussed the use of the house with Khawaja when they met in Lahore a few days later. He testified

The house had been empty for a while because first, I had said I would move in. Then we thought maybe some of the people that Ausman [Khyam] was working with, they would move. Then we thought Q would move into the house, but there still would’ve been three to four months the house is empty. So – and Momin had his uncle or whoever it was clear the –house, but it still was empty after this time, so he’s trying to tell us that we have to put somebody into that house.
"No one understood better than Stalin that the true object of propaganda is neither to convince nor even to persuade, but to produce a uniform pattern of public utterance in which the first trace of unorthodox thought immediately reveals itself as a jarring dissonance." Leonard Schapiro
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