Khawaja Trial Canada - News Reports

Five life sentences, two acquittals: Peering deeper into the Crevice 7/07 case.

Khawaja Trial Canada - News Reports

Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

24 Jun 2008, 20:36 #1

Key witness Babar allowed to testify
Andrew Duffy
Published: Tuesday, June 24, 2008

OTTAWA - Ontario Superior Court Judge Douglas Rutherford ruled Tuesday he will allow the Crown's star witness in the terror trial of Momin Khawaja to continue to testify about what he heard regarding "the Canadian" - a man assumed to be Khawaja - while in Pakistan.

Earlier, Khawaja's defence lawyer launched an attack on the government's case arguing that Mohammed 'Big Dawg' Babar's testimony should be dismissed as hearsay.

Lawrence Greenspon told Rutherford that Babar - the only al-Qaida informer to have testified in open court - has no direct testimony to offer about Khawaja's involvement in the British fertilizer bomb plot.

"He will testify that he never had a conversation with Mr. Khawaja about the bomb plot in London," Greenspon argued.

Khawaja, a former software developer, is accused of seven terrorism-related charges in relation to an alleged plot to bomb sites in and around London, England.

The charges include allegations Khawaja participated in a terrorist group, used explosives for the commission of a terrorist act, facilitated terrorist activity, financed terrorism, and offered assistance to a terrorist group.

Khawaja has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

Five British Muslims were convicted last year in relation to the same plot.

In issuing his ruling, [Judge] Rutherford said he is not yet in a position to judge the relevance or accuracy of any testimony that might come from Babar - who pleaded guilty in 2004 to providing support to al-Qaida and to the London bomb plotters and is now awaiting sentencing in a New York federal court.

It means, the judge said, that he cannot apply the test that must be used to assess whether to accept hearsay evidence as "necessary and reliable."

He thus ordered Babar's testimony to continue, saying it is possible to accept his evidence, at the very least, as part of a narrative of events.


And as the trial unfolds and more of a complete picture is put before him, Rutherford said, it may emerge that Babar's evidence points to a larger conspiracy that would make it possible to invoke the exception for hearsay evidence.

Babar, 33, hopes to lighten his prison sentence in return for testifying at Khawaja's trial.

Khawaja was the first person charged with terrorism under the Criminal Code, which was amended as part of the Anti-Terrorism Act passed by Parliament soon after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

http://www.dose.ca/news/story.html?id=f ... ddff54d275
Star witness says Khawaja was at terror training camp

Andrew Duffy, Canwest News Service  Published: Tuesday, June 24, 2008

OTTAWA -- The Crown's star witness in the trial of Momin Khawaja has placed the terror suspect at a camp for Islamic fighters in northern Pakistan.

Testifying for the second day, Mohammed ‘Big Dawg' Babar told court Tuesday he first began to e-mail Khawaja -- who has pleaded not guilty to seven terrorism-related charges in connection with an alleged plot to bomb sites in England -- as the Canadian prepared for a trip to Pakistan.

The two exchanged e-mails in July, 2003 by leaving draft messages in an e-mail account Mr. Khawaja shared with Omar Khyam, the man who would later be convicted as the ringleader of a plot to detonate a fertilizer bomb in central London.

Babar said he met Mr. Khawaja in Lahore at Butt's Sweets Bakery, where he told the Canadian to shave his long beard and to wear Western clothes to make himself look like any other tourist. Three or four days later, Babar testified, he drove Mr. Khawaja and Khyam into the tribal areas of northern Pakistan.

He then put them in a car destined for training camp that he [Babar] had helped to establish for Islamic fighters in Malakand, north of Peshawar.

Mr. Khawaja returned to Lahore three or four days later, MrBabar said.

Asked about Mr. Khawaja's demeanor at that time, he said: "He was excited and he enjoyed it."

Later, Mr. Babar said he heard a conversation during which Mr. Khawaja discussed giving money to Khyam in Canadian currency.

Mr. Khawaja told Khyam he wanted half the money to go to "cakat," or charity, and "half of the money was for the other thing, the brothers."

Earlier, Ontario Superior Court Judge Douglas Rutherford ruled he would allow Babar to testify after hearing arguments his testimony should be dismissed as hearsay.

Defence lawyer Lawrence Greenspon told Mr. Rutherford that Babar -- the only al-Qaeda informer to have testified in open court -- has no direct testimony to offer about Mr. Khawaja's involvement in the British fertilizer bomb plot.

"He will testify that he never had a conversation with Mr. Khawaja about the bomb plot in London," Mr. Greenspon argued.

Mr. Rutherford said in issuing his ruling he is not yet in a position to judge the relevance or accuracy of any testimony that might come from Babar.

It means, the judge said, that he cannot apply the test that must be used to assess whether to accept hearsay evidence as "necessary and reliable."

He thus ordered Babar's testimony to continue, saying it is possible to accept his evidence, at the very least, as part of a narrative of events.

And as the trial unfolds and more of a complete picture is put before him, Mr. Rutherford said, it may emerge that Babar's evidence points to a larger conspiracy that would make it possible to invoke the exception for hearsay evidence.

The charges against Mr. Khawaja, a former software developer, include allegations he participated in a terrorist group, used explosives for the commission of a terrorist act, facilitated terrorist activity, financed terrorism, and offered assistance to a terrorist group.

Five British Muslims were convicted last year in relation to the same plot.

Babar, 33, pleaded guilty in 2004 to providing support to al-Qaeda and to the London bomb plotters and is now awaiting sentencing in a New York federal court.

He hopes to lighten his prison sentence in return for testifying at Mr. Khawaja's trial.

Mr. Khawaja was the first person charged with terrorism under the Criminal Code, which was amended as part of the Anti-Terrorism Act passed by Parliament soon after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Ottawa Citizen

National Post
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
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Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

24 Jun 2008, 20:47 #2

Canada's Khawaja key to U.K. terror plot: Crown

Ian MacLeod and Andrew Duffy, Canwest News Service  Published: Monday, June 23, 2008

OTTAWA -- Momin Khawaja secretly used his Department of Foreign Affairs e-mail account to plot the mass murder of hundreds of Britons in the name of radical Islam, court heard on the opening day of the Ottawa man's landmark terror trial.

The plot included possibly unleashing high explosives at London's most popular nightclub, Europe's biggest shopping centre and utilities in and around the British capital in 2004, according to the prosecution.

"Massive destruction and loss of life" would have resulted, Crown attorney David McKercher said in his opening statement.

Further, Khawaja twice travelled to Pakistan, once in 2002 with the intent of crossing into Afghanistan to fight for the Taliban, and again in 2003 for paramilitary terrorist training, court heard.

Star prosecution witness Mohammed (Big Dawg) Babar, the only al-Qaeda informer to have testified in open court, also claims Khawaja associated with an al-Qaeda operative who had planned a military-style assassination of Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf.

Khawaja faces seven terrorism charges related to the foiled spring 2004 plot. Six hundred kilograms of ammonium nitrate fertilizer was to set off violent fireballs to kill and incinerate people inside "soft" public targets, as well as gas and electric utilities.

Five Britons, all Muslims of Pakistani descent, were convicted in a London court last year for their roles and sentenced to life. A major London police-MI5 joint counter-terrorism operation, dubbed Operation Crevice, succeeded in catching the gang in a series of highly incriminating and bugged conversations. Crevice also alerted the RCMP to the presence in London in February, 2004, of a mysterious Canadian, Mohammad Momin Khawaja.

The alleged "Canadian connection" is accused of being the group's explosives detonation expert. He stands charged, among other crimes, of using the basement of his family's suburban Ottawa home to build up to 30 remote-controlled devices to transmit radio signals to the bombs' detonators.

His prototype was dubbed the "Hi-Fi Digimonster."

In his nearby bedroom and another belonging to his younger brother, Qasim, police found several assault rifles, 640 rounds of ammunition, jihad and combat literature and, under Qasim's mattress, more than $10,000 in $100 bills. There was also a working detonating device.

Under the eye of Ontario Superior Court Justice Douglas Rutherford, Khawaja listen to the testimony from a glassed-in prisoner's box, flanked by two RCMP tactical unit officers. He made a point of ignoring Babar.

If convicted on seven terrorism-related charges -- he denies them all -- the court will be the closest the 29-year-old gets to the real world for at least 25 years.

He showed no outward signs of nervousness on the first day of what promises to be a two- to three-month legal slugfest over whether he plotted with a British terror cell.

About 60 spectators, mostly police and justice officials and news reporters, filled the gallery of the courthouse's ceremonial courtroom -- No. 37 -- decorated with rich oak panelling and deep red carpet, under the soft glow of a dozen polished brass chandeliers.

In Row 1 sat Zenab Armend Pisheh, wrapped in a powder-blue head scarf. The young woman is to testify in July that Khawaja had her set up a Canadian bank account to transfer money and other materials to the London cell.

Federal lawyer Derek Rasmussen, who helped handle the Department of Justice's largely successful efforts to keep secret certain government information related to the case on the grounds its release would harm national security, watched from Row 4.

Directly behind him, in Row 5, were Khawaja's parents, Mahboob and Azra.

McKercher, in his opening address, attempted to paint a portrait of a young man filled with hate against "kuffars" [non-believers] and a blind devotion to al-Qaeda's violent jihad ideology and the creation of a sweeping Islamic order.

Court heard that among 29 e-mails the Crown is expected to tender as evidence, one allegedly authored by Khawaja talks of "two of the best things in life ... victory or martyrdom."

Other evidence, said McKercher, will show how Khawaja used his e-mail account at his Department of Foreign Affairs office, where he worked on contract as a software developer, to discuss his progress on the Hi-Fi Digimonster with his co-conspirators in Britain.

Other e-mails, he said, will show Khawaja considered using his Foreign Affairs position to courier the device itself to Britain. He could disguise it, he said, as computer parts. He allegedly also boasted he could use the same system to send detonating devices to Pakistan for other terror operations.

"They send things everywhere all the time and nobody asks anything," Khawaja told his colleagues, according to evidence that's to be led in the case.

Under heavy security Babar, 33, took the stand. He pleaded guilty in 2004 to providing support to al-Qaeda and to the London bomb plotters and is now awaiting sentencing in a New York federal court. He hopes to lighten his prison sentence in return for testifying here against Khawaja.

But as an al-Qaeda turncoat, his life is serious jeopardy. Perhaps as a result, he's lost considerable weight since his appearance at London's Old Bailey in 2006.

For almost three hours, in a New York accent, he recounted bits and pieces of his life. He wanted to be a pharmacist, but dropped out of university after one year.

In a bizarre twist, his mother was working in one of the World Trade Center towers in Lower Manhattan when the jetliners struck on 9/11.

She survived and he became an Islamist warrior. He was soon back in his native Pakistan as a jihadist for the group al-Muhajiroun, supplying cash and military equipment to al-Qaeda and other Islamist fighters in Afghanistan.

He already knew Sheik Omar Bakri, the British-based leader of the Islamic extremist group al-Muhajiroun and later made contact with Sheik Abu Hamza, the extremist cleric at the North London Central Mosque, a one-time suspected hotbed for terrorist recruiting.

After settling in Lahore and continuing to work for al-Muhajiroun, Babar met a number of young British Muslims who were attempting to join the Taliban's fight in Afghanistan. He also made at least one extended visit to Britain, where he met with several of the Crevice gang.

He said in 2002, at the home of Crevice ringleader Omar Khyam south of London, Khawaja met an al-Qaeda operative named Abdul Haleem. Haleem, he said, had earlier purchased AK-47 assault rifles, grenades and other weapons from a corrupt Pakistani army officer to assassinate Musharraf. The plan fell apart when Haleem's chief contact to disgruntled Pakistani military officers was arrested.

The following year, in July, 2003, McKercher said Khawaja travelled to an al-Qaeda-style training camp in Pakistan's northwest frontier where he learned how to fire an AK-47 and a rocket launcher, and to work with explosives.

In February 2004, when Khawaja visited Khyam and other Crevice figures in and around London, he and Khyam created an e-mail address that they would later use for clandestine trans-Atlantic conversations. Both had the sign-on and password and only left messages in the website's draft folder without ever actually having to transmit a message electronically, a digital version of the Cold War "dead-letter drop box."

Khawaja returned to Canada on Feb. 23, 2004, and the RCMP began watching him. Their investigation was code-named Project Awaken.

Subsequent e-mails to Khyam were spiced with hip-hop style exchanges, such as: "How's it's goin' niggas, everything OK?"

"Yeah, bro, got home safe."

"How bout you niggas? Everything cool?"

However, it appears that by March 19, 2004, Khyam may have known that the security forces were closing in the group.

"Bro, things are bad. Be prepared, nigga."

On March 29, 2004, Khawaja was arrested at his Foreign Affairs office, while other RCMP officers raided the family's Ottawa home. Within hours, more than 400 British police and security service officers conducted raids there.

Ottawa Citizen

National Post
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
Reply

Bridget
Joined: 26 Nov 2005, 01:46

25 Jun 2008, 12:11 #3

THE KHAWAJA TRIAL
Suspect was devoted to al-Qaeda camp, court told

Canadian terror defendant travelled overseas, brought cash, did whatever he could for the wider group, Crown's star witness testifies


COLIN FREEZE

June 25, 2008

OTTAWA -- Canadian terrorism suspect Mohammad Momin Khawaja enjoyed his visit to an al-Qaeda training camp in Pakistan and it appeared to have a lasting impact on him, a star Crown witness told his Ottawa trial yesterday.

"He said he got to fire AK-47s, RPGs [rocket-propelled grenades] and light machine guns," Mohammed Junaid Babar testified.

Mr. Babar explained he caught up with Mr. Khawaja right after he attended the camp. "He was excited and he enjoyed it."

The camp was built by fledgling British terrorists taking direction from "core" al-Qaeda members, and its graduates went on to kill dozens of civilians in the "7/7" subway strikes in London.

The court heard yesterday that Mr. Khawaja, while not the camp's most notable attendee, travelled from overseas to put in his time at the Pakistan camp and always did whatever he could for the wider group. "He was there maybe two to three to four days - not that long," testified Mr. Babar on the second day of the heavily guarded trial.

The informant, raised in Queens, N.Y., was living in Pakistan in the summer of 2003, and acted basically as a fixer for Western Muslims who had set up the training facility in the mountainous region of Malakand, Pakistan, near the Afghan border.

Mr. Babar testified that about 10 young men, most of them British, stayed with him in Lahore as he helped transport them to and from the camp, 16 hours away.

To assist in transforming the extremist Internet junkies into self-styled holy warriors, the witness said he helped supply the camp with fertilizer, chemicals and chemistry equipment, so attendees could practise making improvised bombs.

Mr. Khawaja passed through the camp quickly and returned to Canada before the bomb-building courses began, according to the Crown witness.

Mr. Khawaja, the first man charged under Canada's Anti-Terrorism Act, is accused of trying to build a remote-controlled detonation device for a British cell as part of a trans-Atlantic conspiracy dating back to two years before his arrest in 2004.

But Mr. Babar also testified Mr. Khawaja brought a large sum of Canadian dollars into Pakistan "for the brothers" during his trip. And after he left Pakistan, Mr. Khawaja e-mailed Mr. Babar to arrange the pickup of another donation of 1,000 British pounds donated by a third party, in order to support the terrorist training effort. Mr. Babar also testified the wider group was granted permission to use Mr. Khawaja's uncle's house in Rawalpindi as a base of sorts - including for an intended meeting with a senior U.K.-based terrorist known only as "Q."

The alleged al-Qaeda member from Luton, England - the shadowy figure known as "Q" - was one of three alleged "core" al-Qaeda members mentioned in passing yesterday by Mr. Babar. A related British trial has heard that "Q" has never been arrested.

The witness further testified that two "core" al-Qaeda figures in Pakistan gave guidance to the group: An "Abu Munthir" in Pakistan (who was reportedly arrested in 2004) and an "Abdul Hadi" (possibly the "Abdul Hadi al-Iraqi" now being held in Guantanamo Bay).

Certain graduates from the Malakand camp went on to plot remote-controlled fertilizer-based bombs around London. They were rounded up in Britain in March, 2004, as Mr. Khawaja was simultaneously arrested in Ottawa on allegations he helped build a remote-controlled detonation device for the group. Five of the British conspirators are now serving life sentences.

Another faction of Malakand graduates was not arrested, and those graduates' freedom had tragic results. They were led by a man who was among the accused in the so-called "7/7" suicide bombings, which killed 52 Londoners riding subways and buses on July 7, 2005.

The U.K. citizen's "martyrdom" video was later spliced with footage from top al-Qaeda figures lauding the attack, and circulated widely on the Internet.

Mr. Babar, the star witness in the Canadian proceeding, testified he knew the 7/7 suspect when the man stayed in his house in Pakistan en route to the camp, a few weeks after Mr. Khawaja had done the same.

Mr. Babar, who immigrated to New York from Pakistan when he was two years old, was arrested in the United States shortly after the fertilizer bomb conspiracy was broken up.

He is testifying in Canada, as he has already in Britain, under the terms of a plea deal, in hopes of reducing his eventual U.S. sentence.

Globe and Mail
�To those who are afraid of the truth, I wish to offer a few scary truths; and to those who are not afraid of the truth, I wish to offer proof that the terrorism of truth is the only one that can be of benefit to the proletariat.� -- On Terrorism and the State, Gianfranco Sanguinetti
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Bridget
Joined: 26 Nov 2005, 01:46

25 Jun 2008, 22:22 #4

  Court told of terror-case e-mails

COLIN FREEZE

Globe and Mail Update

June 25, 2008 at 1:44 PM EDT

OTTAWA — The nub of the case against the first man charged under Canada's antiterrorism act is contained in two significant - and uncontested - e-mails he wrote six months before he and a group of British suspects were arrested.

Defence lawyer Lawrence Greenspon admitted his client, Mohammad Momin Khawaja, 29, wrote messages that include clear references to building detonators, bringing recruits to a guesthouse in Pakistan and sending money and night-vision goggles to insurgents in Afghanistan.

The e-mails also discussed sending a friend on “a one-way-mission to the most high in Yahoodi land,” which a Crown witness testified was in reference to an intended suicide bombing in Israel.

One e-mail sent by Mr. Khawaja said: “Bro, I will start on the remote devices thing right away and will let u know once we have it ready for testing. And I'll find some of the things for testing, Urea, nitro, phosphate, anything else we need.

The e-mails were entered into evidence on the third day of Mr. Khawaja's heavily guarded trial, as testimony from informant Mohammed Junaid Babar, 33, continued.

Mr. Babar, an American who was living in Pakistan at the time of the alleged conspiracies, didn't receive the e-mail in question but testified he was privy to much of what was being discussed. He said he had heard about other schemes, too, as Mr. Khawaja visited Pakistan.

These included “a project that Momin was working on with his brother” that called for outfitting remote-control model airplanes with explosives, Mr. Babar said.

Police raided the Khawaja family home in March, 2004, and court has heard the Crown say the RCMP seized a remote-controlled detonation device, guns, bullets, jihadi literature and $10,000 in cash.

None of Mr. Khawaja's family members were charged.

The seizures appear to have been foreshadowed by messages Mr. Khawaja wrote about six months earlier, while communicating with a British terrorist ringleader, Omar Khyam, now serving a life sentence in the United Kingdom.

They communicated on a shared Yahoo account, saving messages in “Draft” form so they would be less vulnerable to interception.

The e-mail was sent shortly after Mr. Khawaja's second trip to Pakistan, when, according to Mr. Babar, he brought over money, invisible ink and a medical kit for extremist associates.

The court also heard that Mr. Khawaja tried to revisit a training camp where he had fired off a rocket propelled grenade launcher a few months earlier, but was disappointed to learn there was no longer any ammunition for the RPG.

Mr. Khawaja is then alleged to have returned to Canada and redoubled his efforts to aid what he regarded as an international jihad against the West.

“We still don't have my house [in Pakistan] being used,” he wrote in the Oct. 19 e-mail. “It's still empty so do you know any bros from the UK that wanna go to PK any time soon so we can put them up there.”

A week later Mr. Khawaja sent a follow up message regarding remote controlled detonators.

“Ok nigga we can get the devices the cost to make em is about 4 pounds each, remote detonation, I think the range is about 2 kilometres ...”

He also suggested that a mutual friend, “Immy,” known to the group as a mentally challenged loose cannon, had the makings of an excellent martyr.

“Also bro, when I was in PK me and Kash talked about Immy, what's he gonna do there? We have a suggestion to use the bro for a one way operation to the most high, maybe, in Yahoodi land.”

This Sunday Oct. 19, 2003 draft message was saved to the account nicole_chic_shara@yahoo.co.uk , an account shared as a security measure so that Canadian terrorism suspect Mohammad Momin Khawaja and British terrorist ringleader Omar Khyam could communicate.

Both men were arrested for involvement in an alleged bomb conspiracy six months later. Mr. Khawaja visited Pakistan shortly before the e-mail was sent, and his defence lawyer admits his client wrote it.

“Nigga your message always give me a laugh! Yeah the porn vid's ain't ready yet. I just got back home. I met with Kman and he said that the faces of people that they did not want to show in public right now. I think maybe if we edit the video and block out some of the stuff then maybe Kman and all the other bros will agree to send the videos over. You can talk to Kman and tell him I can fix up the video's [sic] if you want. I also talked to him about the computer stuff , communicating safely, so I will try to set up something for the bros so we can have a better way of staying in contact.

“Kash is doing good. I gave him the money also and two phone cards with the numbers and explained the costs of using them in the mobile. We went to the village but none of the niggaz are there right now. Immy went for medical treatment to Pindi I think with the Doctor.

“The place looked good. Kash cleared up the trouble with the niggz and things are good now with all the people. But we still don't have my house being used. It's still empty so do you know any bros from the UK that wanna go to PK any time soon so we can put them up there. I need a solution for this bro, so try and ask around the bros, if anyone wants to head to PK they can live there.

“Also bro I will start on the remote devices thing right away and will let u know once we have it ready for testing. And I'll find some of the things for testing, Urea, nitro, phosphate anything else we need?

“But I think Kman said they needed night vision goggles and that stuff here is cheaper so if u want we can try to gets some for the bros from here at the cost of maybe 300 UK? I can look into it. Anything else bro that we need to do, or any help needed separately?”

A Message Mr. Khawaja wrote using the same account on Oct. 27, just over a week later:

“Ok nigga we can get the devices the cost to make em is about 4 pounds each, remote detonation, I think the range is about 2 kilometres, it is small in size. We can try a few out here and let u know how things go. Also I'm looking for the other things. Also bro, tell Kash to parcel the video from the summer. I can put something together here.

“Also bro, when I was in PK me and Kash talked about Immy, what's he gonna do there? We have a suggestion to use the bro for a one way operation to the most high, maybe, in Yahoodi land. What do you think.”
�To those who are afraid of the truth, I wish to offer a few scary truths; and to those who are not afraid of the truth, I wish to offer proof that the terrorism of truth is the only one that can be of benefit to the proletariat.� -- On Terrorism and the State, Gianfranco Sanguinetti
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Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

27 Jun 2008, 16:58 #5

Terror suspect was courier to al-Qaida, key witness says
Posted By BY JIM BROWN, THE CANADIAN PRESS
Posted 1 day ago [26/6/08]
 

Momin Khawaja acted as a courier to deliver money and supplies to al-Qaida, mused about using a model airplane to carry explosives and theorized at one point about sending a colleague on a suicide mission to Israel, the former software designer's terrorism trial has heard.

Mohammed Babar, the prosecution's star witness, testified yesterday that on a visit to Pakistan in October 2003 Khawaja brought along cash, a medical kit and invisible writing implements.

Babar said the money - about 1,000 British pounds and an unknown amount in Canadian dollars - was handed over along with the other material to a go-between, who in turn was to deliver them to Sheik Abu Munthir, an al-Qaida lieutenant in northern Pakistan.

The money and supplies that Khawaja was carrying allegedly came from Omar Khyam, one of five men convicted last year in Britain of conspiring to bomb a nightclub, shopping centre and electrical and gas distribution facilities.

Khawaja faces seven charges arising from the same plot. He has pleaded not guilty and is being tried by Justice Douglas Rutherford of Ontario Superior Court without a jury.

Babar, in his third straight day of testimony, recalled a meeting at which he said Khawaja briefed Salahuddin Amin - another of the convicted British bomb plotters - on efforts to build a remote-controlled model plane to deliver explosives.

Khawaja and one of his brothers back in Ottawa "were trying to navigate it with a GPS device, trying to find a way to do it," said Babar.

It appears nothing ever came of the effort, although Babar noted that Amin, upon hearing of the plan, joked about using the plane to bomb Pakistani intelligence.

In subsequent e-mail traffic entered in evidence yesterday, Khawaja also suggested sending a British acquaintance - then living in Pakistan - on a suicide mission to Israel.

Or as Khawaja put it in his own words: "We have a suggestion. To use the bro for a one-way operation to the most high, maybe in Yehudi-land."

The candidate for martyrdom was a man identified only as Imran, or Immy, previously described by Babar as "not too bright" and someone who wasn't entirely trusted by his colleagues.

The Israeli plot, like the model airplane caper, never came to fruition. But the testimony served to buttress Crown efforts to paint Khawaja as a man who was ideologically committed to jihad and maintained contacts among Islamic extremists in Britain and Pakistan.

Other e-mails presented yesterday by Crown attorney Bill Boutzouvis were aimed at establishing another element of the case against Khawaja - that he made a house owned by his family in Rawalpindi available for jihadi cohorts in Pakistan.

The messages showed that Khawaja, Babar and Khyam carried on a running discussion on the subject in the fall of 2003, with Khawaja anxious to know if anyone had moved into the dwelling yet.

http://www.thewhig.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1089451
Imran is/was Zeeshan Siddique, the Control Order escapee.
Khawaja trial shows terror threat must be taken seriously
David B. Harris, For The Calgary Herald
Published: Friday, June 27, 2008

If terrorism suspect Momin Khawaja, now on trial in Ottawa, is as guilty as Crown prosecutors say, it'll be time to settle an important question: Was Khawaja a "Naji man"? Amid trial allegations, court details and defence objections, significant questions arise about Khawaja's status as a consultant to the Department of Foreign Affairs at about the time of his arrest. Prosecutors claim the software contractor used his perch inside the department to send streams of e-mails to confederates abroad -- that federal resources were, in other words, used to advance terror plots.

Authorities also say Khawaja might have used privileged Foreign Affairs department travel documents to travel on his "missions." And that he allegedly suggested using special departmental courier services to send bomb-related equipment to foreign associates, in the apparent belief that a government imprimatur on shipments confers immunity from customs searches. Insiders can do a lot of damage in sensitive government and private-sector establishments. From intelligence organizations to banks, history is replete with examples of infiltrators and penetrators undermining computer systems, removing money, spilling secrets. Remember Barings Bank? Kim Philby?

So questions must be asked. If, for the sake of argument, Khawaja was working against Canadians and their allies, what access did he have to departmental personnel, to electronic records, communications and associated encryption systems?

Who recommended and hired him in the first place? A friend? If the government's version is correct, why would a software consultant be so confident about his access to special courier services? Did he have a network of friends at the department? It is the early days, and no decisive answers are on offer.

But these things must be asked whenever a possible radical or extremist Islamist breach of security is hinted at, and here's why: Islamic extremists and subversives place great emphasis on infiltrating social, political, economic and security apparatuses of target nations, such as Canada, with a view to manipulating and undoing their infrastructure.

Last year's dramatic Holy Land Foundation trial in Texas made the point. There, U.S. prosecutors put klieg lights on previously secret strategic documents seized from extremist Muslim Brotherhood sources. This subversive worldwide organization is the front from which spring a number of hardline "mainstream" North American Islamic front groups and "representative organizations," including many recently defined as unindicted co-conspirators by the U.S. Justice Department -- and some, amazingly, periodically engaged in "outreach" by unsuspecting interfaith and even government officials. The prize U.S. document was the Brotherhood's 1991 long-term plan to subvert and collapse the United States and its political, economic and other infrastructure, preparatory to achieving a forced radical Islamicization of that country, and others. Through a malign combination of immigration, intimidation, psychological warfare and subterfuge, the Brotherhood proposed "settling" -- colonizing -- the U.S., infesting its infrastructure, and relying on societal openness, constitutional freedoms and influence operations to proceed from there: "The process of settlement is a 'Civilization-Jihadist Process'," said the memorandum, adding ominously, "with all the word means."

more...
http://www.canada.com/calgaryherald/new ... c35a85e69b
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
Reply

Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

01 Jul 2008, 12:41 #6

Bomber, Khawaja trained at same camp
Both took terror instruction in northern Pakistan, trial told
Posted By BY JIM BROWN, THE CANADIAN PRESS
Posted –1st July 2008
 

The ringleader of the infamous July 2005 London transit bombings that killed 52 Britons attended the same terrorist training camp as Momin Khawaja, the Ottawa software designer's trial has been told.

Mohammed Siddiqui Khan was identified in testimony last week as one of several British Muslims who spent time at the camp in the remote Malakand region of northern Pakistan in the summer of 2003.

Khan's name couldn't be reported initially because of a publication ban imposed by Justice Douglas Rutherford of Ontario Superior Court.

The judge has since lifted the ban in response to arguments made by several media outlets.

Mohammed Babar, the Crown's star witness at the Khawaja trial, has testified that Khan -- whom he knew at the time only by the code name Ibrahim -- visited the Malakand camp with a group of other men seeking training in the use of explosives.

Crown attorney David McKercher also mentioned Khan in his opening address at the trial, noting that he had been spotted by investigators in Britain in the company of Islamic extremists who also had regular contact with Khawaja.

There has been no evidence to date to show that Khawaja and Khan had any direct dealings with each other.

Rather, the Crown has pointed to their common associates as part of a broader effort to portray Khawaja as a committed jihadi.

Babar testified that the people who accompanied Khan to the Malakand camp included Omar Kkyam and Jawad Akbar, two of the five men convicted by a British court last year for participating in a failed plot to bomb a London nightclub, a shopping centre southeast of the city, and parts of the U. K. electrical and gas grids.

The case came to be known as the Crevice prosecution, a reference to the police code name of Operation Crevice that uncovered the plot.

Khawaja faces seven Canadian charges arising from the conspiracy, including a key allegation that he built a remote-controlled detonator to set off home-made, fertilizer-based bombs.

He has pleaded not guilty to all charges and is being tried by Rutherford without a jury. The trial, currently in recess, is to resume Wednesday.

Babar, a former al-Qaida operative turned police informer, has testified that Khawaja visited the Malakand camp in July 2003 and, although he spent only three or four days there, learned to fire an AK-47 assault rifle, a rocket-propelled grenade launcher and a light machine-gun.

http://www.thesudburystar.com/ArticleDi ... ?e=1095629
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
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Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

02 Jul 2008, 13:18 #7

From terrorist to al-Qaeda snitch: The story of Babar
Crown's star witness was devoted jihadist who turned against Muslim 'brothers'
Andrew Duffy, with files from Ian MacLeod, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Wednesday, July 02, 2008

In Mohammed "Big Dawg" Babar's jihadist world, morality is a changeable monster.

Mr. Babar, 33, the only al-Qaeda informant to testify in a Canadian courtroom, was the star witness during the first week of Momin Khawaja's landmark trial. His detailed testimony knit Mr. Khawaja to an al-Qaeda-led conspiracy to detonate a fertilizer bomb in central London. But his testimony, delivered without hesitation in a soft, clear voice, also revealed much about the dichotomous Mr. Babar.

Mr. Babar became a devoted jihadist despite the fact his mother could have died in the World Trade Center attack. He believed Islam was at war with the West, which meant that all forms of thievery and murder were religiously allowed. What's more, his testimony this week devastated the claims of innocence from his former "brother," Mr. Khawaja, who once sent Mr. Babar $880 in answer to his plea for money to return to the U.S. from Pakistan.

That kind of moral elasticity may be a function of the fatalism embraced by many of those engaged in jihad, said security expert Wesley Wark, a visiting professor at the University of Ottawa.

"I think it's very hard to understand why anyone would behave as Mr. Babar did: why you would go off to fight jihad just after your mother escaped an attack of that kind on the World Trade Center, or why at the end of the day you might change course entirely and, even in your own self-interest, testify against your former comrades-in-arms.

"The only way that I can begin to understand that is through the self-defined philosophy of jihad that many of these individuals possess: It is infused with a degree of fatalism which is pretty foreign to western, secular practice."

"There's a sense that your fate is not in your own hands, but is in God's hands."

In Mr. Babar's case, Mr. Wark said, his jihadist philosophy was "pretty superficial and infused with a kind of youthful hubris and arrogance and rapture with violence."

"So in that kind of moral climate," he said, "a lot goes."

Indeed, Mr. Babar's journey from New York car jockey to Islamic jihadist to al-Qaeda stool pigeon is a singular terrorist narrative.

Born in Pakistan, but raised in Queens, New York, Mr. Babar decided to go to war against the West after al-Qaeda orchestrated the terror strikes against the World Trade Center and Pentagon. His mother worked for a bank on the ninth floor of the north tower, but managed to escape unharmed.

Nonetheless, Mr. Babar left for Pakistan one week later to launch his personal jihad. "After 9/11, that is when I decided it was time to go to Afghanis-tan to fight," he told Ontario Superior Court this week.

Mr. Babar had dropped out of New York's St. John's University after one year in a pharmacy program and had worked in menial jobs as a parking valet and security guard.

For years before 9/11, his religious and political views had been hardening. A devout Muslim, he was angered by the presence of U.S. forces on what he considered the sacred soil of Saudi Arabia after the 1991 Gulf War. He also believed that the governments of the Middle East were corrupt and needed to be removed "the jihad way," through force.

Mr. Babar sought and found others with similar views on the Internet. He joined a political movement, the British-based al-Muhajiroun, or ALM, which advocated the widespread application of shariah law and the Islamization of the West.

He would sometimes speak by phone to the group's co-founder, Omar Bakri Muhammad, who offered religious guidance to the small group of U.S.-based ALM members.

But the ALM did not officially endorse the use of violence, so Mr. Babar actively sought out those who did. He found them among the radical wing of the al-Muhajiroun in Britain and Pakistan.

Mr. Babar told court that he went to work for the ALM office in Lahore, Pakistan, in October 2001 and began to agitate for the removal of Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, who was supporting the U.S. in the war on terror. (He would later admit to taking part in two plots to assassinate Mr. Musharraf.)

Mr. Babar's Lahore apartment soon became a halfway house for British "brothers" making their way to Afghanistan or work for ALM. The term "brothers," he told court, referred to Muslim brothers and to al-Qaeda members.

Mr. Babar said he, too, wanted to fight in Afghanistan. What he didn't reveal in court was that he first drew international attention to himself by declaring as much to western journalists in November 2001. Mr. Babar approached reporters at the Marriot Hotel in Islamabad, telling them that he had flown to Pakistan from New York to fight the U.S. invasion of Afghanis-tan.

"I will kill every American that I see in Afghanistan," he told a British TV news reporter. "It's time to prove my loyalty to the Muslims of Afghanis-tan."

The fight in Afghanistan was over, however, before he made it into that country. Instead, in January 2002, Mr. Babar married a woman in Lahore and took an apartment there with his new wife.

But his jihad would continue. In late 2002, Mr. Babar travelled to Britain to meet other radicals and to raise money that could help support Islamic fighters in Afghanistan. At a mosque in Crawley, south of London, he met Omar Khyam, who would later be convicted for his leading role in the London bomb plot. Another man asked if Mr. Babar could set up a jihadi training camp in Pakistan.

By June 2003, Mr. Babar had secured a piece of mountainous land in the remote Malakand region of northwest Pakistan. Others were brought in to train recruits to use AK-47 assault rifles, light machine-guns and grenade launchers.

In June 2003, Mr. Khyam visited Mr. Babar's Lahore home to discuss the notion of taking the jihad to Britain. Potential targets for their bomb plot included British pubs, nightclubs and train stations, he said.

Mr. Babar subsequently acquired some of the materials needed to test and deliver a fertilizer bomb, including aluminum powder and nitric acid. He travelled to the Malakand training camp, where the explosive material was tested successfully.

In mid-July, Mr. Khawaja arrived in Pakistan after making arrangements with Mr. Khyam, Mr. Babar said. He met Mr. Khawaja for the first time, and directed him to the Malakand training camp where the Canadian spent three or four days before returning to Lahore. "He (Mr. Khawaja) said he had a chance to fire the RPG (rocket-propelled grenade launcher), the AK-47 and the light machine-gun. He was excited and enjoyed it," Mr. Babar testified.

He told court that Mr. Khawaja later discussed plans to fit a remote-controlled model airplane with explosives and to establish a terrorist training camp in Canada. Another time, he said, there was talk of the Canadian computer and electronics expert creating a jihadi computer virus.

Mr. Khawaja, he said, also arranged for "the brothers" to occupy a vacant home his family owned in Rawalpindi, near Islamabad.

Aided by money Mr. Khawaja sent him, Mr. Babar returned to the U.S. with his wife and newborn baby. He was arrested on April 6, 2004, by the FBI shortly after police in London and Ottawa raided the homes of suspects in the fertilizer bomb plot.

One month later, he agreed to testify against other alleged members of the plot in return for a lighter sentence. He has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to five terrorism charges related to the organization of a jihad training camp, the purchase of bomb-making equipment and the material support of terrorists.

His plea agreement states that he must give truthful evidence in foreign trials related to the fertilizer bomb plot or else face a sentence of 70 years in prison, without the right to appeal. His testimony in London's Old Bailey courthouse last year helped to convict five men in connection with the fertilizer bomb plot.

Crown attorney David McKercher, however, told court in his opening statement that Mr. Babar remains committed to the jihadist philosophy and was testifying against Mr. Khawaja to reduce his prison sentence. Mr. Babar has yet to tell court in his own words what motivated him to offer testimony against his former associate.

Mr. Wark said Mr. Babar, who will be cross-examined by defence lawyer Lawrence Greenspon today, has so far lived up to his star billing. "He was very composed, a professional witness in a sense," said Mr. Wark, who attended last week's proceedings.

The kind of insider's knowledge offered by Mr. Babar, he said, is a "godsend" to prosecutors in a security intelligence case like Mr. Khawaja's. "He is one of these rare witnesses in a counter-terrorism trial who has the ability to remove the ambiguity from intelligence and surveillance evidence because he can explain the meaning of this quasi-coded communication and so on.

"He really puts a lot of convincing substance on what can sometimes be the ethereal material of intelligence collection."

source:Ottawa Citizen
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
Reply