Eye Witness Accounts

In the aftermath of the murder, a cascade of misinformation and lies from the very top down. From Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Ian Blair to the trigger-happy plain-clothes shooters identified only as "carrying a long-barrelled weapon", the actions that day have been exposed as a cover-up of the events that resulted in the extra-judicial execution of an innocent man.

Eye Witness Accounts

Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

08 Dec 2005, 18:02 #1

Two members of the public were to become key witnesses. Christopher Wells, a 29-year-old photo processing shop manager, said: "I was coming through the barriers when I saw a man running very fast into the station. Behind him were loads of policemen all carrying weapons. There were at least 20 of them and they had big black guns.

"The man ran towards a large number of people standing around and jumped over the barriers. The police ran after him and jumped the barriers as well, shouting at the crowd to leave immediately. The man carried on running and was followed down."

Sitting in the carriage was Mark Whitby, 47, a water hygiene surveyor from Brixton. "He ran on to the train hotly pursued by three plain clothes officers, one of them wielding a black handgun. As he got on the train, I looked at his face. He looked sort of left and right but basically looked like a cornered rabbit. He looked absolutely terrified."

According to Mr Whitby, Mr de Menezes had half-stumbled and been half-pushed to the floor. Moments later, Mr Whitby saw the officer hold a pistol in his left hand and take aim. "He held it down to the guy and unloaded five shots into him," he said.

A third witness, Anthony Larkin, described police officers shouting "Get down, get down" and how the man they were pursuing appeared to have "a bomb belt and wires coming out".

Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story ... 17,00.html
"The problem with always being a conformist is that when you try to change the system from within, it's not you who changes the system; it's the system that will eventually change you." -- Immortal Technique

"The media is the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power. Because they control the minds of the masses." -- Malcolm X

"The eternal fight is not many battles fought on one level, but one great battle fought on many different levels." -- The Antagonist

"Truth does not fear investigation." -- Unknown
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Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

08 Dec 2005, 19:03 #2

Jason Dines was a passenger on a Victoria line tube train which arrived at Stockwell station as the shooting was taking place.

"When we pulled into Stockwell there was just a lot of panic on the platform," he told News 24.

"Everyone who was on the platform was just running from one end of the platform down to the exit as quickly as possible.

"There was a real wave of panic on my train, people were banging on the doors saying, you know, 'come on, open the doors, let us get off, we want to get off the train'.

"Because of that panic, you couldn't actually hear what the driver's announcements were, what he was telling us to do which was a bit of a problem.

"The doors opened, we got onto the platform, then you could hear the PA address system on the platform - the drivers were basically saying get back on the train.

"There were people very, very shaken, a couple of people crying. It was quite an unsettling experience."

Source: BBC News
"The problem with always being a conformist is that when you try to change the system from within, it's not you who changes the system; it's the system that will eventually change you." -- Immortal Technique

"The media is the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power. Because they control the minds of the masses." -- Malcolm X

"The eternal fight is not many battles fought on one level, but one great battle fought on many different levels." -- The Antagonist

"Truth does not fear investigation." -- Unknown
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Joined: 07 May 2006, 23:31

15 Sep 2006, 17:48 #3

Dan Copeland was sitting on the train at Stockwell tube station when a man was shot by armed police on 22 July.

He describes how he saw the man jump on board the train and grab the person sitting opposite him.

BBC Report

Police have confirmed that armed officers have shot dead a man at Stockwell tube station in south London on 22 July.

Passenger Mark Whitby told BBC News he had seen a man shot five times by "plain-clothes police officers".

BBC Report
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Joined: 07 May 2006, 23:31

15 Sep 2006, 17:58 #4

If you want you can delete this thread, there's already another posting regarding these witnesses, didn't see it at first...
http://z13.invisionfree.com/julyseventh ... owtopic=30
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Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

23 Dec 2008, 14:10 #5

From a CNN report from the afternoon of 22nd July 2005
Police kill man on London Tube

Friday, July 22, 2005 Posted: 1445 GMT (2245 HKT)

Stockwell station remains closed following Friday's shooting.
Image: 

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• Gallery: Images from Thursday's incidents 

• Interactive: Incidents across London on July 21
• Send us your accounts and multimedia
• CNN Access:  Incidents similar to earlier blasts
• Eyewitness accounts:  People 'ran for their lives'
• 'Arson bid' near suspect's home
SPECIAL REPORT

• Interactive: Maps and galleries
• Victims: Fatalities identified
• Special Report: London TerrorYOUR E-MAIL ALERTS

LONDON, England (CNN) -- Police have shot a man dead at a London subway station a day after bombers apparently failed to repeat the carnage of the July 7 blasts.

Four suspects in Thursday's attempted bombings of three London train stations and a double-decker bus have been identified through closed circuit television footage, a police source with knowledge of the investigation said.

It was unclear if the man shot Friday at Stockwell Underground station in south London was one of the four suspects but London's police chief said the shooting of the suspect was "directly linked" to continuing anti-terrorist operation in the city.

Ian Blair, commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police, appealed to the public for information about the whereabouts and identity of the four suspects.

CCTV images of the four suspects were later shown.

One commuter Teri Godly described how she had stood next to the man the British media described as a suspected suicide bomber before police charged in and shot him several times.

"A tall Asian guy, shaved head, slight beard, with a rucksack got in front of me," she told Sky News television.

"Shortly after that, as I was about to get onto the train, eight or nine undercover police with walkie talkies and handguns started screaming at everyone to 'get out, get out.'"
(More eyewitness)

The incident just after 10 a.m. (0900 GMT) Friday triggered new fears about the security of the city's transit system just one day after four attempted bombings targeted three Underground trains and a bus.

A Scotland Yard spokesperson said: "We can confirm that just after 10 a.m. armed officers entered Stockwell Tube station.

"A man was challenged by officers and subsequently shot. London Ambulance Service attended the scene. He was pronounced dead at the scene."

The Stockwell station is one stop down and about a mile away from the Oval station, the scene of one of four attempted bombings on Thursday.

The London Underground said there were line suspensions on the Victoria and Northern lines, but later said the Victoria Line had reopened except for Stockwell station. Trains were passing through Stockwell but not stopping. The Northern Line was still suspended between Kennington and Morden stations.

The road passing by the Stockwell station was also closed.

In addition, authorities said one other station -- Highbury and Islington toward the north end of the Victoria Line -- was being evacuated after the incident at Stockwell, but they did not have further details.

The shooting is a rarity in London, where police generally are not armed except for special response units.

Police later said they were searching an address at Harrow Road, to the west of the city.

In addition, an east London mosque on Whitechapel Road said it had received a bomb threat and called police. The mosque was evacuated while police checked the building. It was cleared and people were allowed back inside.

The shooting Friday came as police were hunting the bombers who struck London's transport network the day before.

The would-be terrorists attempted to set off another string of bombs on London Underground trains and a double-decker bus Thursday, leaving behind "significant" forensic evidence when the devices failed to detonate, the city's police commissioner said.

"Our lucky day," said a banner headline in the Daily Mirror newspaper. "Four bombs, three trains, one bus, zero deaths."

The Sun newspaper ran the banner headline: "Four suicide bombers on loose."

The aftermath resulted in some Friday morning headaches for commuters as London transport officials kept the Warren Street and the Oval stations closed.

The incidents came two weeks after a series of blasts killed 56 people, including four men identified as the bombers, on another three trains and a bus.

But police Commissioner Blair said it was "too early to say" whether there was a connection between the events.

"Clearly, the intention must have been to kill. You don't do this with any other intention," Blair said. But he added: "The intention of the terrorists has not been fulfilled."

Police hotly defended their safety measures amid questions over any evidence suggesting a second round of attacks was likely.

Michael Bowron, assistant police commissioner for the City of London Police, told CNN: "We're making this place as safe as we can in the circumstances, and I think it's wholly unfair to talk about intelligence failures.

"Clearly, there's a new face to terrorism, and we're working very closely with our colleagues to find out what that nature is, and how to get into it, and how to prevent it in the future."

Intelligence expert Crispin Black told CNN: "Whatever happened yesterday, I suspect wasn't what the terrorists wanted to happen. It would appear that they are under some sort of pressure. It might be to do with their bombs -- people are asking 'where are the bombing masterminds?'

"And there is another plus point to this: We have got four people on the run, and the police appear to have good forensic evidence to build up a picture from.

"My guess is that all four of these people will not be able to get away. They have no escape plan if they were suicide bombers, and so the advantage is now playing to the security and intelligence agencies."

Witnesses reported small explosions aboard Underground trains north, south and west of the city center and aboard a bus in east London early Thursday afternoon. One person was reported wounded.

British Prime Minister Tony Blair said the incidents were designed "to scare people and frighten them."

"I think we just have got to react calmly and continue with our business as much as possible as normal," he added.

Witnesses' accounts led to suggestions that detonators had gone off but failed to trigger bombs. The police commissioner would say only that some devices "remain unexploded," and he said police evidence technicians were going over the scenes. (More on Thursday's blasts)

"We do believe that this may represent -- may represent -- a significant breakthrough, in the sense that there is obviously forensic material at these scenes which may be very helpful to us," Blair said. "So I feel very positive about some of these developments."

But he said the investigation was still in an early stage and cautioned against the "enormous amount of speculation" concerning the incidents. Police urged anyone with photos or video taken around the time of the incidents to e-mail them to investigators.

Police took two men into custody after the blasts, including one man arrested near the prime minister's residence at 10 Downing Street. He was released without charge early Friday, while the first man, who was arrested two stops away from the Warren Street station, was released a few hours earlier.

http://edition.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europ ... tube.1545/
'He looked like a cornered fox'

Friday, July 22, 2005 Posted: 1425 GMT (2225 HKT)


Whitby said he was "totally distraught" after seeing the shooting.

RELATED
• Gallery: Images from Thursday's incidents 

• Interactive: Incidents across London on July 21
• Send us your accounts and multimedia
• CNN Access:  Incidents similar to earlier blasts
• Eyewitness accounts:  People 'ran for their lives'
JULY 7 BOMBINGS

• Interactive: Maps and galleries
• Victims: Fatalities identified
• Special Report: London TerrorYOUR E-MAIL ALERTS

LONDON, England (CNN) -- Eyewitnesses to Friday's shooting at a London Underground station described seeing a man being chased onto a train and then shot several times at close range.

Police confirmed to CNN that armed officers had shot a man dead at Stockwell station in south London. (Full Story)

One witness, Mark Whitby, told BBC news the man appeared not to be carrying anything but was wearing a thick coat that looked padded.

Whitby said a young Asian man was shot five times after being chased into a train carriage by three men.

"As the man got on the train I looked at his face. He looked from left to right, but he basically looked like a cornered rabbit, like a cornered fox. He looked absolutely petrified," said Whitby.

"He sort of tripped but they were hotly pursuing him and couldn't have been more than two or three feet behind him at this time.

"He half-tripped, was half-pushed to the floor. The policeman nearest to me had the black automatic pistol in his left hand, he held it down to the guy and unloaded five shots into him.

"He looked like a Pakistani but he had a baseball cap on, and quite a thickish coat. It was a coat like you would wear in winter, a sort of padded jacket. It looked out of place in the weather we've been having."

Whitby said he had been about five yards away from where the incident occurred and was "totally distraught" by what he had seen.

He said 10 to 15 police officers armed with pistols and sub-machine guns had run down to the platform as he was helping an elderly woman away from the train.

"It was just mayhem ... I've never seen people move so fast in all my life."

"People running in all directions, looks of horror on their faces, screaming, a lot of screaming from women, absolute mayhem. Lots of people sort of crouched down, trying to run but in a crouched position, me included. Trying to protect their heads, worried about flying bullets."

But commuter Teri Godly told Sky News television the man had been carrying a rucksack.

"A tall Asian guy, shaved head, slight beard, with a rucksack got in front of me. Shortly after that, as I was about to get onto the train, eight or nine undercover police with walkie talkies and handguns started screaming at everyone to 'Get out, get out'," she said.

Chris Wells told the UK's Press Association he was leaving Stockwell station when he saw a man being pursued inside by at least 20 armed police.

"The next thing I saw was this guy jump over the barriers and the police officers were chasing after him and everyone was just shouting 'Get out, get out,'" Wells said.

Christopher Scaglione was also leaving the station when he heard a bang, followed by shouting.

"People then started to run and I heard two or three more bangs, like people shooting."

Journalist Chris Martin said he was waiting at Stockwell station when several men burst onto the platform.

"There was a lot of shouting, I thought it was football fans or something," he told the UK's Press Association.

"There was obviously some sort of altercation going on, and then they came flying onto the platform and these guys just threw this man into the open doors of the train.

"Then I heard shots. I thought it was three but someone else said five. It sounded like a silencer gun going off, and then there was blind panic, with people shouting and screaming and just running away.

"I didn't actually see the gun, but I heard this 'bang, bang, bang.'"

Christine Burgess, a 56-year-old accountant, told PA she had seen police carry a black zip-up bag to an ambulance outside the station as she tried to get home on a bus.

"I was looking out of the window and saw them bring out the black zip-up bag and that must have been the person involved because nobody else was hurt. I saw it taken into the ambulance."

CNN's Nic Robertson said the area around Stockwell station, a major transport interchange, had been cordoned off by police, bringing traffic to a halt and causing major disruption.

Several police vans and unmarked police cars were still at the scene, along with an air ambulance. An ambulance was seen leaving the area.

http://edition.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europ ... index.html
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
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Joined: 11 Nov 2006, 01:39

23 Dec 2008, 14:27 #6

Were these witnesses, who saw the padded coat, the running and jumping of barriers and the shooting of five shots into a petrified Asian, called to the Inquiry?

Many things about the Inquiry still confuse me - I genuinely feel many questiones were not asked, let alone answered satisfactorily.

Maybe I am dumb - Maybe just ill-informed.
People don't do what is right.
They do what's most convenient
And then they repent.
DYLAN
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Joined: 05 Jul 2007, 02:18

23 Dec 2008, 19:47 #7

It's eyewitnessaloonery: an impressive amount of policejournalist bullshit in one story:
From The Times

July 23, 2005

Suspect shot dead 'had no bomb'


By Adam Fresco, Rajeev Syal and Steve Bird

ARMED undercover police chased and shot dead a man directly linked to the London bombers’ terror cell after he ran into a South London Underground station and tried to board a train.

It is understood that he was found not to have been carrying a bomb.

Three officers had followed him to Stockwell station after he emerged from a nearby house that police believed to be connected with Thursday’s attempted bombings.

The suspect, described as being of Asian appearance and wearing a thick, bulky jacket, vaulted over a ticket barrier when challenged by police and ran down the escalator and along the platform of the Northern Line.

When the armed officers reached the platform with their guns drawn, they shouted at everyone to get down. As waiting passengers and those already on a train that had pulled into the station dived to the floor, the suspect jumped on the train. Two witnesses said that as he entered the train he tripped, ending up half in and half out of the carriage, on all fours. Within seconds, as the clock tower outside the station chimed 10am, the officers caught up with the man and pushed him hard to the floor. Witnesses said that they then fired up to five bullets into him at close range, killing him instantly.

Anthony Larkin, 30, was waiting on the platform when he saw a man in a black bomber jacket and jeans running towards him being chased by the officers. Mr Larkin, a care assistant, from Hartlepool, Teesside, said: “The officers were shouting, ‘Get down, get down’. I immediately hit the ground. I saw the man fall over and then I heard two shots that I believe went into his back.

“There was lots of panicking, people ran screaming out of the station and they were keeping their heads down. I just got up and joined them, running as fast as I could.”

Alerted by the bulk of his jacket, police had followed the suspect on foot for some time and became concerned when he approached the Tube station.

After the officers were ordered to stop him from entering the station at all costs, they challenged him before he crossed the main road to the station.

When they drew their weapons and shouted “Stop, armed police”, the man looked over his shoulder and bolted.
He was described as being very fit and agile.

After the suspect had been shot police sent a robot to examine the man, because of fears that any device could still prove a danger. But it is understood that no device was found.

Police are describing him as an “intimate accomplice of the cell”. His name and address were thought to have been found among the possessions left by the would-be bombers on Thursday.

Police sources said he did not live at the address from which he had been followed.

Another witness said that the suspect boarded the Tube and attempted to take a hostage before he was shot.

Dan Copeland
, a Northern Line passenger, told BBC News: “The man burst in through the carriage door to my right and grabbed hold of the pole and a person by the glass partition near the door, diagonally opposite me.

“An officer jumped on to my left and screamed, ‘Everybody out’. As I turned out of the door on to the platform I heard four dull bangs.”

The Metropolitan Police said that an Independent Police Complaints Commission investigation will begin, which will inevitably focus on some of the witness accounts.

The incident sparked panic among travellers, some of whom were treated for shock and minor injuries.

Within 20 minutes of the shooting, more armed officers from Scotland Yard’s SO19 group ran into the station carrying semi-automatic weapons, witnesses said.

At 10.42am police cordoned off an area around the station and closed off the busy A3, which runs between Central London and the South Coast. Traffic was backed up for miles. At the same time, the Victoria and Northern lines were stopped. They reopened at 12.20pm.

Just before that, Christine Burgess, 56, who was travelling past the station on a bus, said that she saw a body bag being brought out of the station and put into an ambulance.

Early this morning the area was still cordoned off.

THE RULES OF ENGAGEMENT

# They must give sufficient time for a suspect to observe the warning, unless that puts anyone at risk
But Duncan, what men believe isn't important - it's our actions which make us right or wrong. - Alasdair Gray - Lanark
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