Crevice Trial

Five life sentences, two acquittals: Peering deeper into the Crevice 7/07 case.

Crevice Trial

numeral
Joined: 04 Dec 2005, 17:55

14 Sep 2006, 13:16 #1

Follow the numbers.
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Bridget
Joined: 26 Nov 2005, 01:46

15 Sep 2006, 15:31 #2

British defendant in terror plot trial tells of gradual conversion to militant jihadist

· Attitude hardened after visit to training camp
· 'Soft, kind and humble' Taliban impressed him

David Pallister
Friday September 15, 2006
The Guardian

A 24-year-old British Muslim told the Old Bailey yesterday about his ideological journey from schoolboy to militant jihadist. Omar Khyam, a defendant in the fertiliser bomb terror trial, described how he became radicalised after a visit to a Pakistani training camp for militants fighting in Kashmir and a trip to Afghanistan to meet the Taliban.

At the time no one around him talked of attacks in Britain, he said. "I was born here and felt allegiance," he said. He supported England at football. But after the US invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 and of Iraq in 2003, he said that attitudes among some of his friends hardened: "For the first time I began hearing that Britain should be attacked."

Mr Khyam was arrested in 2004 after fertiliser explosive was found in a storage depot in west London. The prosecution allege he was a member of a British terror cell linked to al-Qaida, which discussed bombing nightclubs and other targets in the UK.

Mr Khyam, his brother Shujah Mahmood, 19, Waheed Mahmood, 34, and Jawad Akbar, 23, all from Crawley, West Sussex, Salahuddin Amin, 31, from Luton, Anthony Garcia, 24, of Ilford, east London, and Nabeel Hussain, 21, of Horley, Surrey, deny conspiring to cause explosions likely to endanger life between January 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004.

Mr Khyam, Mr Garcia and Mr Hussain also deny a charge under the Terrorism Act of possessing 600kg (1,300lb) of ammonium nitrate fertiliser for terrorism.

As the defence case began, Mr Khyam told the jury that his grandfather had served in the British army and came to the UK in the 1970s. Many of his family were in the Pakistani military or ISI, the intelligence service. He said he went to a predominantly white school, was captain of the cricket team and did well in his GCSEs.

He became more interested in religion as a teenager at college in Surrey, attending meetings of the radical group al- Muhajiroun, where violent videos of the wars in Chechnya and Bosnia were shown. He also started to learn about fighting in Kashmir between India and Pakistan with the ISI recruiting and training irregular mujahideen.

On a family visit to Pakistan in 1999 he sought out and talked to groups active in Kashmir, he said. Back in Britain, he wanted to dedicate himself "to helping Kashmiri Muslims, and go to Pakistan for military training".

In January 2000, aged 18 and studying for his A-levels, he ran away to Pakistan and joined an ISI-run training camp for militants in the mountains above Rawalpindi. He had told his mother he was going to France to study but arranged for a letter explaining his real movements to be sent home.

"They told me everything I needed to know for fighting guerrilla warfare in Kashmir," he said. This included training with AK47 rifles, rocket-propelled grenades and machine guns as well as reconnaisance and sniper techniques. He left only after his family used their contacts in the ISI to find him and he was summoned from the mountains for an emotional reunion with his grandfather.

Although concerned for his safety, most of his family, except his mother, were happy with his actions.

In June 2001, having enrolled at the Metropolitan University in north London for a computer course, he returned to Pakistan for a friend's wedding. In one of the militant group's offices he saw bags of fertiliser which he took to be part of their "arsenal". He then visited Kabul and was impressed by the Taliban. "They were soft, kind and humble, but harsh with their enemies."

The attacks on the US on September 11 2001 triggered intense discussions among British Muslims. Mr Khyam's reaction was: "I was happy. America was, and still is, the greatest enemy of Islam. They put up puppet regimes in Muslim countries like Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Egypt ... but obviously 3,000 people died so there were mixed feelings."

The Qur'an forbids the killing of women and children but some eminent Muslim scholars decreed that the attacks were permissible, he said.

After a few months of debate, and seeing the defeat of the Taliban, he said he had come to the conclusion that it had been tactically unwise. "I think we would be working better in our own [Muslim] countries, trying to establish an Islamic state," he said.

Asked about Osama bin Laden, he said. "In Afghanistan he won people's hearts and minds. People love him all over the region. There are pictures of him all over the place in Pakistan."

During 2002 and 2003, Mr Khyam became actively engaged in collecting "money and equipment" in the UK to be sent to Pakistan for the mujahideen. He also made further trips to the country. "I wanted to help out in the cause," he said.

Mr Khyam said he did not think that two men he dealt with in Pakistan were members of al-Qaida, as alleged by the American supergrass Mohammed Junaid Babar. Asked by his counsel, Joel Bennathan, whether one of the men had ever advised him, or told him, to carry out an attack on the UK, Mr Khyam replied: "No".
Guardian
�To those who are afraid of the truth, I wish to offer a few scary truths; and to those who are not afraid of the truth, I wish to offer proof that the terrorism of truth is the only one that can be of benefit to the proletariat.� -- On Terrorism and the State, Gianfranco Sanguinetti
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Bridget
Joined: 26 Nov 2005, 01:46

18 Sep 2006, 16:51 #3

Terror trial delayed by suspect's fears for family

The trial over an alleged plot by a terror cell to bomb Britain was suddenly halted today when a key defendant refused to continue giving evidence, claiming that security forces had visited his family in Pakistan.

Omar Khyam, 24, who is accused with six others of planning a bombing campaign of Britain with more than half a tonne of fertiliser explosive, said that he was now worried about the safety of his family, the Old Bailey heard.

Last week the jury was told by Mr Khyam how he had gone to Pakistan to receive military training.

During his two days in the witness box Mr Khyam said: "The ISI (Pakistan's Intelligence service) was setting up training camps in what we called Free Kashmir, funding it (them) with money and weapons, and people that would train people, and logistical supplies, everything. It was because Pakistan didn’t want their soldiers dying."

He described how he went to a training camp in Pakistan in January 2000 and was taught about guerrilla warfare. He said that people were selected by the ISI who worked with Islamic groups.

The jury were due to hear today about the fertiliser that was discovered in a West London storage depot. Mr Khyam had denied planning operations for English targets, but had yet to explain why he allegedly bought it.

Asked by his counsel, Joel Bennathan, whether he had bought the fertiliser with the help of others, he said he would not go on.

Mr Khyam, who was wearing a yellow open-neck shirt, said: "Before we go on to that topic, I just want to say the ISI in Pakistan has had words with my family relating to what I have been saying about them.

"I think they are worried I might reveal more about them, so right now, as much as I want to clarify matters, the priority for me has to be the safety of my family so I am going to stop.

"I am not going to discuss anything related to the ISI any more or the evidence."


The court was adjourned for lawyers to consider the situation.

After more than an hour, the court resumed for the judge to warn Mr Khyam that the jury could draw inferences from his refusal to continue.

Sir Michael Astill told the defendant: "If you refuse to answer questions, the jury may draw such inferences as appears proper from your failure to do so."

Mr Khyam answered "yes" when asked if he understood.

The jury was then told to leave the courtroom. The case was later adjourned until tomorrow.

Mr Khyam, his brother Shujah Mahmood, 19, Waheed Mahmood, 34, and Jawad Akbar, 23, all from Crawley, Sussex, Salahuddin Amin, 31, from Luton, Bedfordshire, Anthony Garcia, 24, of Ilford, east London, and Nabeel Hussain, 21, of Horley, Surrey, deny conspiring to cause explosions likely to endanger life between January 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004.

Mr Khyam, Mr Garcia and Mr Hussain also deny a charge under the Terrorism Act of possessing 1,300lb (600kg) of ammonium nitrate fertiliser for terrorism.

Mr Khyam and Shujah Mahmood further deny possessing aluminium powder for terrorism.
�To those who are afraid of the truth, I wish to offer a few scary truths; and to those who are not afraid of the truth, I wish to offer proof that the terrorism of truth is the only one that can be of benefit to the proletariat.� -- On Terrorism and the State, Gianfranco Sanguinetti
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The Antagonist
Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

18 Sep 2006, 17:11 #4

[quote=""Omar Khyam""]"The ISI (Pakistan's Intelligence service) was setting up training camps in what we called Free Kashmir, funding it (them) with money and weapons, and people that would train people, and logistical supplies, everything. It was because Pakistan didn’t want their soldiers dying."

Before we go on to that topic, I just want to say the ISI in Pakistan has had words with my family relating to what I have been saying about them.

"I think they are worried I might reveal more about them, so right now, as much as I want to clarify matters, the priority for me has to be the safety of my family so I am going to stop.

"I am not going to discuss anything related to the ISI any more or the evidence.
"[/quote]
Now that's what you call a show-stopper!
"The problem with always being a conformist is that when you try to change the system from within, it's not you who changes the system; it's the system that will eventually change you." -- Immortal Technique

"The media is the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power. Because they control the minds of the masses." -- Malcolm X

"The eternal fight is not many battles fought on one level, but one great battle fought on many different levels." -- The Antagonist

"Truth does not fear investigation." -- Unknown
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Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

18 Sep 2006, 20:38 #5

Latest news from the OPERATION CREVICE trial

From http://news.uk.msn.com/Article.aspx?cp- ... tid=936017
(emphasis mine)
pa.press.net - 18.09.2006 19:35
Fears for family halt terror trial
Omar Khyam.

The fertiliser terror trial at the Old Bailey was dramatically stopped on Monday when one of the accused refused to continue giving evidence.

Omar Khyam, 24, said he was worried about the safety of his family in Pakistan.

Khyam, who is accused with six others of plotting a bombing campaign of Britain with more than half a ton of fertiliser explosive, was the first to give evidence.

He entered the witness box last week and spent two days talking about going to Pakistan to receive military training and then "working for the cause" to free Islamic lands. After speaking on Friday afternoon about raising money for Afghanistan using fraud, he was due to talk about the fertiliser on Monday morning.

The men, accused of being a British al Qaida linked cell, were arrested in March 2004 after the fertiliser was discovered in a west London storage depot.

Khyam had denied planning operations for English targets but had yet to explain why he allegedly bought it. Asked by his counsel, Joel Bennathan, whether he had bought the fertiliser with the help of others, he said he would not go on.

Khyam said: "Before we go on to that topic, I just want to say the ISI (Pakistani secret services) in Pakistan has had words with my family relating to what I have been saying about them. I think they are worried I might reveal more about them, so right now, as much as I want to clarify matters, the priority for me has to be the safety of my family so I am going to stop. I am not going to discuss anything related to the ISI any more or the evidence."

The court was adjourned for lawyers to consider the situation.

Khyam, his brother Shujah Mahmood, 19, Waheed Mahmood, 34, and Jawad Akbar, 23, all from Crawley, Sussex, Salahuddin Amin, 31, from Luton, Bedfordshire, Anthony Garcia, 24, of Ilford, east London, and Nabeel Hussain, 21, of Horley, Surrey, deny conspiring to cause explosions likely to endanger life between January 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004.

Khyam, Garcia and Hussain also deny a charge under the Terrorism Act of possessing 1,300lb (600kg) of ammonium nitrate fertiliser for terrorism. Khyam and Shujah Mahmood further deny possessing aluminium powder for terrorism.
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
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Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

19 Sep 2006, 08:17 #6

More Operation Crevice Trial Info.

(Operation Crevice was the operation which, prior to March 30th 2004, detained Mohammed Siddique Khan, made a video of him, and then released him to then travel to Pakistan...............)


From http://www.westernresistance.com/blog/a ... 02362.html

The picture below shows six of the (OP Crevice trial) seven defendants, apart from Nabeel Hussain.




Jawad Akbar (top left), aged 22, from Crawley. Alias: Hamza.

Omar Khyam (top center), aged 24, from Crawley, West Sussex. He is said to by prosecutors to be at the "centre of operations".

Shujah Mahmood (top right), aged 18, from Crawley. Younger brother of Omar Khayam. It is claimed he came to Pakistan with digital scales for weighing ratios of ammonium nitrate and aluminium powder.

Waheed Mahmood (bottom left), aged 34, from Crawley. He worked for the power company, National Grid Transco, assumed to have been a potential target for a bomb. Aliases: Abdul, Esmail or Javed.

Anthony Garcia (bottom center), aged 27, from Iford, East London. Alias: Rahman Adam.

Salahuddin Amin (bottom right), aged 31, from Luton, Bedfordshire. Spent much time in Pakistan. Alias: Khalid.

Nabeel Hussain (not pictured), aged 20, from Horley, Surrey. A student from Brunel University, he is the only one who did not attend training camps, and the only one allowed bail.

============

So what happens now with the trial??
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
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Dave52
Joined: 14 Jul 2006, 09:00

19 Sep 2006, 08:40 #7

So many of these cases seem to involve Intelligence Assets, surely some mainstream media has to have the balls to pick up on this sooner or later.

Does anyone remember the Daren Brown show where he spent about a week with some middle-management types and turned them into armed robbers with just the power of suggestion? Can you imagine what an MI6 team could do over the course of a year...?
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