BBC Watch

Keeping an eye on the media coverage of July 7th, and taking the media to task over their inaccuracies, mis-leading statements and distortions. Post all your complaints and responses here! If you spot inaccuracies in the media coverage, here's the place to tell us about it.

BBC Watch

The Antagonist
Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

02 Jun 2006, 01:15 #1

If the security services are not to blame, who is?

The blame here lies firmly and squarely with the four mass murderers who committed these suicide bombings.

Source: Q&A: July bombings report
Impartial, fair and accurate to the last is Aunty Beeb.

Perhaps the BBC would care to present a formal case for the prosecution, with something a little better than "there's no CCTV but suspect X MUST have been there" and maybe this time around they'll not place the accused on the (late) 7.48am train (well done Horizon) instead of the (cancelled) 7.40am as stated in the government narrative.

RELEASE THE EVIDENCE!
"The problem with always being a conformist is that when you try to change the system from within, it's not you who changes the system; it's the system that will eventually change you." -- Immortal Technique

"The media is the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power. Because they control the minds of the masses." -- Malcolm X

"The eternal fight is not many battles fought on one level, but one great battle fought on many different levels." -- The Antagonist

"Truth does not fear investigation." -- Unknown
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Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

18 Jan 2008, 18:44 #2

BBC ‘slow to call’ terrorist attack in July

18 November 2005

BBC head of news Helen Boaden has admitted the corporation was slow to abandon the claim that a power surge was the reason for explosions on the London tube on 7 July, rather than a terrorist attack.

Speaking at a session on breaking news, Boaden said the strap placed across the bottom of the screen on the morning of the bombings still bore the words ‘power surge' even when presenters were conveying details of the explosion on the bus in Tavistock Square.

"We've now learned that the strap and headlines condition the sense of the story," she said.

Boaden told the conference recent research carried out by the BBC had revealed the audience are more forgiving over the facts when watching a breaking story rather than a package aired during a bulletin.

"The audience are more sophisticated than we give them credit for — they are far more understanding when stories are unfolding than when they are watching bulletins. They expect a far higher level of accuracy during bulletins," she said.

Boaden also said : "We don't wake up saying ‘let's be second'. We wake up saying ‘let's be winners, let's be first'. If we are unsure of the facts or sources are contradictory, we pause longer than the competition — it's in our DNA."

■ In the same session, Sky News' executive editor John Ryley said he was frustrated by the perception of 24-hour news as being "flimsy and narrow". He said: "There is this view that we skim the surface, but we actually have the time to drill down into stories to find our what is going on. Yet people still ask ‘Is 24-hour news broad enough, does it go deep enough?'"

source:Press Gazette
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
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Kier
Joined: 07 Dec 2005, 15:21

18 Jan 2008, 20:07 #3

Helen Boaden had to defend the BBC over other allegations......
London bomb blasts

Last Updated: Monday, 11 July, 2005, 16:49 GMT 17:49 UK

"Insensitive" and "sensationalist" are some of the adjectives used by complainants to describe BBC News coverage of the London bomb blasts on the day.

The largest number of complaints - around a hundred - were about television footage of a man being resuscitated shortly after a bomb blast.

Viewers found the pictures very upsetting. Some were concerned that if family and friends saw them they would have been extremely distressed.

The BBC responded immediately that inclusion of the footage had been an accident and it would not be shown again.


Graphic mobile images

Complaints were also received about the use of mobile phone images and video clips sent in by members of the public who witnessed the bomb scenes.

Comments ranged from concerns that the images were too graphic and intrusive to criticisms that the mobile network would be jammed at a time when people were desperate to keep in contact.

Head of BBC News, Helen Boaden, responded that great care was taken over the selection of images, which had added greatly to the reporting of the day's events.

"The pictures submitted by the public were so good, live and relevant that we were able to use them right across our coverage." she said.

The BBC has used "user-generated material" in the past - for instance during the Asian Tsunami and the Boscastle floods. But the response to events on July 7 was unprecedented.

The BBC received around 50 images from the public within an hour of the first blast and this rose to more than a thousand within 24 hours.


Source: BBC News
Helen Boaden was also reportedly behind the memo in July 2005 which told reporters and newscasters to avoid using the 'T' word (something she certainly managed herself when describing what she was told by witnesses to the Glasgow Airport incident, which I can't even find on the BBC site). Staff were asked to use less 'loaded terms' instead, which induced a predictable reaction. Like this one. And this one. And this one.

'Mass murderers' is of course a much less 'loaded term' than terrorist, yes.
"We are not democrats for, among other reasons, democracy sooner or later leads to war and dictatorship. Just as we are not supporters of dictatorships, among other things, because dictatorship arouses a desire for democracy, provokes a return to democracy, and thus tends to perpetuate a vicious circle in which human society oscillates between open and brutal tyranny and a lying freedom." - Errico Malatesta, Democracy and Anarchy 1924
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Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

22 Jan 2008, 15:42 #4

From a post at RI Board
How They Slant TV From A – Z, by Bruce Herschensohn (1976)




http://www.amazon.com/Gods-Antenna-Bruc ... 448&sr=1-5

The tricks to manipulating TV news were exposed by an angry U.S. Information Agency video expert in his 1976 book, 'The Gods of Antenna.'

Ironically, this book by an award-winning US government propaganda expert, Bruce Herschensohn, helps us better understand the most valuable of the CIA's 'family jewels' revealed to the Church Senate sub-committee in 1975 by CIA Director, William Colby, the Central Intelligence Agency's control of mainstream media news used to manage public opinion and appropriately called 'Operation Mockingbird.'

He was an ultra-conservative Nixon staffer who was mad at the network newsrooms for their calculated campaign to create an atmosphere of outrage that enabled the 'Silent Coup' (different book) we call Watergate, a campaign enabled by Naval Intelligence officer, Bob Woodward at the CIA-Washington Post.

Sometimes when factions within the secret government duel, we find out how they work.
Both the Pentagon and CIA wanted to get policy control back from Nixon.

Instead of getting shot like JFK, Nixon was made to walk the media plank towards impeachment and then resigned the day after GHW Bush told him to, not wanting that crossfire of hot lead alternative.

Watergate hearings revived the myth of 'the rule of law in a system that works' and the outraged masses (recently called by Obama "the excesses of the sixties") were placated by Nixon's removal.
This enabled the Reagan cocaine-death squad years as 'investigative journalism' was stuffed back into its bottle by blaming it for losing the Vietnam War, the same 'stab in the back' psy-ops that helped the rise of Hitler.

Bruce Herschensohn saw all his own professional tricks being used by the CIA's network news writers and angrily let the psy-ops cat out of the bag himself, right into our hands, the hands of the 'outraged masses.'
Live and learn.

From Herschensohn's book on page 68-
    "For years, film and video techniques were used only to enhance the productions for audiences that wished to be entertained; therefore, those techniques deserved to be as guarded as a magician's hat. But those techniques were being used, and at the writing are still being used, to enhance distortion for audiences that wish to be informed.
As in the days of varityped contracts, the fine print of television is more important than the bold print, but too often it passes unnoticed, just as it is intended to do."


After citing tactics used by Nazi propaganda master, Joseph Goebbels, such as "the list" technique of piling on charges so that some inevitably stick in the public's mind, Herschensohn gives us hints about the CIA's Operation Mockingbird by paying an insider's clever tribute to the musical nick-names for both major Cold War propaganda organizations, the Soviet KGB’s  'Red Orchestra' and the American CIA's 'Mighty Wurlitzer.'

page 45-
    "The symphony was being conducted by network television, playing to the national audience for a year and a half. Its orchestration and performance were masterful. Its composer remained anonymous to most of the millions who watched as the musicians played their instruments almost flawlessly."


Bookjacket flap bio of author-

"Bruce Herschensohn was deputy special assistant to President Nixon in 1973-74, having first served as director of Motion Picture and Television Services of the United States Information Agency from 1968 through 1972.
Born in Milwaukee in 1932, he spent his teen years in Los Angeles and went to work for RKO Radio Pictures in the early 1950s. After a stint with the Air Force during the Korean War, he returned to Hollywood and the motion picture industry as producer, director, writer, and editor. For eleven years he headed his own motion picture company.
His film credits include the documentaries 'Years of Lightening, Day of Drums' and 'The Five Cities of June,' the latter nominated for an Academy Award in 1964. Under Herschensohn the USIA Film Division won an Academy Award and was nominated for five others. He was named one of the ten Outstanding Young Men in the Federal Government in 1969 and received the Distinguished Service Award in 1972, the second highest civilian honor."


Below are Herchsensohn's list of techniques for slanting TV news.
I've copied first the basic "A - Z" list and followed it with a second version with his general descriptions but omitting his examples that are specific to Watergate news coverage unless an example clarifies better than just the description.


These techniques are all examples of subliminal framing, something I find in news and entertainment alike.
That's why I took particular note of my favorite-

"V. Oblique emphasis reporting:
This is the most important and most often used technique of network news. Seemingly straight reports are very often subtle editorializations. The use of words and phrases gives transient and subliminal points of view to the audience, most often without audience knowledge. "

   

U.S. Information Agency Video Expert's 'How They Slant TV - A to Z' list

A. Story placement

B. The hold frame

C. Selective Segmentation

D. Commentator speculations that appear to be factual

E. The truth but not the whole truth

F. Catch phrases

G. Utilizing the chemistry of combined audio and visuals

H. Visual emphasis to audio by selection of phrases for audience to read

I. Pretense balancing

J. Selectivity of interviewees

K. Treatment and respect given an interviewee

L. Prompting an interviewee

M. Methods of reading

N. Set design for visual authority

O. Narration rather than visuals - when it suits the purpose


P. Recap of past news to relate to the present

Q. Crediting and discrediting

R. Creation of news

S. Inclusion or omission of crowd reaction

T. Focal length

U. Tragedy and comedy style reporting

V. Oblique emphasis reporting

W. Ignoring follow-up stories

X. Story association and grouping

Y. Acceptance of TV editorials

Z. Repetition

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

U.S. Information Agency Video Expert's 'How They Slant TV - A to Z' list plus descriptions

A. Story placement: 
The first story on a network newscast is largely perceived by the audience as being the most important news of the day; the second story, the second most important; and so on through the first group of stories.
If a network would like to give particular significance to a story or less significance to a story, their placement within the newscast establishes an immediate priority of importance within the viewer's mind.
(3 examples)

B. The hold frame: 
This is an old motion picture technique, which now has wider use in television than in historical films. Since November 1963 it has often been referred to as the "Jack Ruby Frame."
(When Ruby killed Lee Harvey Oswald, the technique was used on replays of the video tape to visually stop the action at the moment the bullet hit Oswald.)
The technique is used to "catch" something the audience might otherwise have missed. It interrupts the motion to hold on one still picture from the moving action so that a particular frozen image can be examined by the viewer. In sporting events such as football or the finish line of a close horse race, the hold frame is particularly useful.
It can also be used to give the impression of "catching" an event it did not "catch" or "catching" a person it did not "catch."
(1 example)

C. Selective Segmentation: 
What was once a primitive or at least sloppy technique has become what is almost impossible to distinguish as it comes across the screen. The network's objective is to cut out portions of a speaker's comment and, by use of tied-together excerpts in false continuity, make the total effect different from his original in-context remarks. The primitive method was simply to physically cut out the film of the undesired area and splice and splice the two remaining wanted ends together. This results in a jump-cut, which can be seen by the audience and leaves room for suspicion and looks crude. The professional device is to use a cut-away of an interviewer or a cut-away of a chart, or whatever seems appropriate, and then cut back to the speaker. Both the visual and the audio cut can be accomplished while the cut-a-way is on screen. This can be used, and is most often used quite ethically to excerpt, cut down, or give certain segments of a speaker's performance without jarring visual effects, as would be evident without a cut-a-way. But it can and has been used unethically to change emphasis and meaning of what someone has said. It is difficult to recognize an excerption. At times, but not always, it can be ascertained by an inconsistency in audio quality behind the cut-a-way or as the shot changes.
(1 example)

D. Commentator speculations that appear to be factual: 
Although the words are couched and the periods are in the right places separating information from speculation, the end effect of this technique is to give the listener the impression that only facts are being reported. The transient character of television airways reporting permits this to be effective whereas, if the report were printed in a newspaper or magazine for examination, there would be risk of discovery. "There's reason to believe..." and "could be" are often used.
(1 example)

E. The truth but not the whole truth: 
Although the whole truth is known to the reporter or commentator, only a portion is told, which casts an invalid impression by intent.
(7 examples)

F. Catch phrases: 
With unnoticed and unattributed bias, an editorialized catch-phrase is added to the nation's vocabulary, by force of habit. Catch phrasing is a printed-word and audio technique that has been streamlined by television with the use of "Anti-War Movement," "Peace Movement," "The Saturday Night Massacre," "The Mysterious Alert," "Operation Candor," "The White House Germans," and "The Christmas Bombing" (and, as previously mentioned, the word "Watergate" itself, used to house all charges of the period). The streamlining was applied by using catch phrases as matter-of-fact routine and by repetition as "fact phrases," making them appear to be nonbiased actualities.
(6 examples)

G. Utilizing the chemistry of combined audio and visuals: 
Often a visual image gives one impression, the audio another, and the combination of the two used simultaneously creates a distortion. (Most significantly, as mentioned, this technique was used to inject "Watergate," without the use of the word, by the projection of the Watergate Complex on the rear screen behind the commentator while he talked of an unrelated story.) The modifications of this technique are endless.
(2 examples)

H. Visual emphasis to audio by selection of phrases for audience to read: 
Charles Guggenheim used this technique of printed words upon the screen in the television commercials for Senator McGovern's race for the Presidency.
Examples:  1. The technique was steadily applied by the networks as a method to emphasize out-of-context areas of the transcripts of President Nixon's tape recordings.
(2 examples)

I. Pretense balancing: 
The motive is to show that the presentation is showing all sides of a particular story when, in fact, the balance is tilted.
(3 examples)

J. Selectivity of interviewees: 
The meaning of a news event can be given a decided tilt by those selected to be interviewed.
(2 examples)

K. Treatment and respect given an interviewee: 
The audience is immediately given an impression about the person being interviewed by the questions he is asked and by the manner in which he is addressed by the reporter conducting the interview.
(2 examples)

L. Prompting an interviewee:
Words can easily be put into an interviewee's mouth by the interviewer. It is most effective if the interviewer's question is phrased so that it can be cut out, while the answer is retained as a complete statement. Obviously, if the manner in which the interviewee answers is not a complete statement, the question cannot be omitted. The objective is to coach the interviewee.
(1 example)

M. Methods of reading: 
Reading slow or reading fast or an accent on a particular word or a faint smile or a shake of the head give editorialization that cannot be found by rereading the text of the report or interview, but can be found only by viewing and listening to the newscast.
(1 example) 

N. Set design for visual authority: 
Every executive knows that a desk can give a visual sense of importance to the man who sits behind it. When in the company of a visitor, most executives follow the rule of rising from the chair behind the desk and walking to another chair without the separation of the desk as a barrier importance between the host and guest. The very visual posture of a commentator gives him a look of authority.
(1 example)

O. Narration rather than visuals - when it suits the purpose: 
Often a new event will occur in which visuals will create a negative effect when the producer hopes to achieve a positive impression, or a positive effect when the producer hopes to achieve a negative impression. In this case, visuals defeat the purpose, and only narrative is used.
(1 example)
Example: When President Nixon worked in his Executive Office Building Suite, Dan Rather would refer to it as "his small, hideaway office" to CBS viewers. There were stills of the office, but stills would have defeated the purpose of Dan Rather's line, since the office was a very large one, used as his working quarters. The term "hideaway" was also inaccurate. Dan Rather was informed when the President went to work within his Executive Office Building suite, as were all the members of the White House Press Corps. It was, in fact, a more public suite than the Oval Office as it was the one place the public could see him enter and exit as they watched from the street. Dan Rather's continual referral to it as "the President's small, hideaway office" had a sinister ring of secrecy and isolation, and it could have raised suspicions in the minds of some viewers: "What is he doing in there?" "Why does he go to a small hideaway?"

P. Recap of past news to relate to the present: 
While telling a real news event, a re-cap is given to something that happened days, even weeks ago, as though it had direct relation to the current event. In that way audience interest may be revived in a non-news story.
(3 examples)

Q. Crediting and discrediting: 
This newswriting technique is designed to give credit to an editorial factor of the writer's choosing.
(8 examples)

R. Creation of news: 
Sometimes there is no event during the day relating to a continuing story that the network wants to sustain. Creating a related event is no real problem. One method is for the network to send a newsman and a camera crew over to the Capitol to talk to a senator or congressman about "the story." If the senator or congressman is willing, he or she can make news in an instant. Many are willing, since it is an opportunity to be seen and heard by millions. Networks generally recognize a particular senator's or congressman's point of view before an interview is filmed. If it doesn't turn out as they want, it can be discarded. Other methods of creating news are to give an unimportant item an extended story length, to have reporters quote other reporters, or to emphasize the fact that there is no news regarding a "continuing story."
(3 examples)

S. Inclusion or omission of crowd reaction: 
When reporting a speech of a public figure, it is up to the film editor to decide whether to include the audience reaction of those witnessing the speech. Most often, reaction will be cut in the interest of time, but this is an option that can change the entire character of the address. The character can be retained without the loss of time by leaving in the applause, fading it to a low level, and bringing in the reporter's voice above the applause. During an election campaign report showing two candidates, this technique of inclusion or omission can be used to tilt the character of public reaction to one candidate against another.
(1 example)

T. Focal length: 
Different lenses give separate impressions of the size of a crowd. Every photographer or cinematographer knows that a large crowd can look small, and a small crowd can look large simply by changing from a long lens to a short one, which changes the focal length. Television viewers who want to know the size of a crowd should look for the margins of crowd-ends, as it is the only sure manner in which to make an accurate judgement.
(1 example)

U. Tragedy and comedy style reporting: 
There is no hiding of passions within this type of reporting. The commentator comes right out with it.
(2 examples)
Examples: 1.  John Chancellor, usually one of the most responsible commentators, gave a chilling example of dramatic tragedy reporting on the night of Archibald Cox's discharge and resignations of Elliot Richardson and William Ruckelhaus. When televised passion exceeds the immediate magnitude of the event, such excess can sometimes create its ultimate importance. The following are excerpts from John Chancellor's report:
      "The country, tonight, is in the midst of what may be the most serious constitutional crisis in its history...That is a stunning development, and nothing even remotely like it has happened in all of our history...You are watching a special NBC Report of another event this year that we never believed would have happened in the history of this Republic...A constitutional situation that is without precedent in the history of this Republic...In my career as a correspondent, I never thought I would be announcing these things..."

V. Oblique emphasis reporting: 
This is the most important and most often used technique of network news. Seemingly straight reports are very often subtle editorializations. The use of words and phrases gives transient and subliminal points of view to the audience, most often without audience knowledge.
(5 examples)

W. Ignoring follow-up stories: 
Follow-up stories are often ignored when their usage would be beneficial to those the networks oppose or harmful to those the networks endorse. This technique is similiar to, but not quite the same as, a total disregard of an important story, to which we devote a later chapter.
(3 examples)
Example:  2.  Howard Hunt testified before the Senate Select Committee about spy work that was conducted against Senator Barry Goldwater in 1964. The story died the next day.

X. Story association and grouping: 
Telling one story and without pause going into another story can imply association between the two. This can be achieved either with or without narrative bridges by grouping stories in succession.
(2 examples)

Y. Acceptance of TV editorials: 
It has become an accepted fact that network news will have an editorial. But why? Why should an editorial view be placed in a news program? Why is it not possible for the audience to find out the news without hearing an editorial?
(1 example)
Example:  NBC and CBS incorporated their editorials within the context of the news programming, which made it most impractical for a viewer to turn the television audio down and then up again just in time to catch the next piece of news. ABC uses a better method of placing its editorials at the end of the program, much like a newspaper editorial, which can be read or simply left unread.

Z. Repetition: 
This is the simplest and oldest technique of any medium that wishes to propagandize a point of view. It was inherited from ages past and has never been used more strikingly or more effectively than it has in television newscasts. When a story appears night after night with little added to the account, or if a continuing story is repeatedly given precedence over other news items that are obviously more urgent in the context of the day's events, it is a safe bet that the network is setting up its own emphasis to maintain an objective, which is usually met. The creation of the most important story today, with repetition tomorrow, can truly make it important the day after tomorrow.
(4 examples)
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
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UrbanBadger
Joined: 30 Aug 2007, 13:26

14 Feb 2008, 10:24 #5

Last nights 10 O'clock News on the Beeb . . . I haven't been able to source a transcript, but if anyone knows where (if) there is one available . . . So I can't quote verbatim . .

Whilst covering the assasination of Imad Mughniyeh, it was stated that he had been known to have 'met with' Bin Laden on a 'couple of occasions', this information was obtained from an 'American security source'. It was then suggested that Iran was behind 9/11 . . . through the tenuous linkage of . . . Bin Laden once met Imad Mughniyeh, who was part of Hezbollah, who are part funded by Iran . . ergo Iran perpetrated 9/11 . . . . anyone want to take a guess where we might be going with this one . . . ?
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Muncher
Joined: 22 Jun 2006, 17:18

14 Feb 2008, 17:08 #6

UrbanBadger @ Feb 14 2008, 10:24 AM wrote:Last nights 10 O'clock News on the Beeb . . . I haven't been able to source a transcript, but if anyone knows where (if) there is one available . . . So I can't quote verbatim . .

Whilst covering the assasination of Imad Mughniyeh, it was stated that he had been known to have 'met with' Bin Laden on a 'couple of occasions', this information was obtained from an 'American security source'. It was then suggested that Iran was behind 9/11 . . . through the tenuous linkage of . . . Bin Laden once met Imad Mughniyeh, who was part of Hezbollah, who are part funded by Iran . . ergo Iran perpetrated 9/11 . . . . anyone want to take a guess where we might be going with this one . . . ?
Video here:
http://upload2.net/page/download/WEe7cE ... h.avi.html
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justthefacts
Joined: 05 Jul 2007, 02:18

15 Feb 2008, 13:17 #7

Identity crisis

Can you imagine Britain in the grip of state surveillance? The creator of BBC1's new thriller did - and then things got really scary...

[snip]

........while writing The Last Enemy, many of the dystopian fantasies Berry dreamt up were overtaken by real events. "I wrote the first episode in which bombs went off on the London underground about a month before 7 July 2005. So I had to take those out.
From the Radio Times

http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/lastenemy/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressr ... nemy.shtml
But Duncan, what men believe isn't important - it's our actions which make us right or wrong. - Alasdair Gray - Lanark
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