The Simplified Science of Beard Growth

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The Simplified Science of Beard Growth

SnowCrash
Beard Elite
SnowCrash
Beard Elite
Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 20th, 2017, 7:42 pm #1

Over the last several months I’ve done a rather insane amount of research on facial hair (I tend to obsess).  This thread will be an attempt to put much of that research into simplified discreet segments.  Please understand that simplification will often lend an incorrect scientific explanation, but the end result should allow at least an understanding of the process on a basic level.  I will likely not be adding much of a bibliography, since my sources are varied, my link list vast, and much of the information came from actual factual books in college libraries or from online scientific publications that require payment to view.  That said, if you want to know more, I’ll do my best to accommodate. Also…  I am not publishing a white sheet in a journal, but attempting to make some rather deceptively complex issues approachable and easily understood.  If I fail in this, feel free to ask questions here, send me a PM, or otherwise make it known.
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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SnowCrash
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SnowCrash
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Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 20th, 2017, 7:51 pm #2

Like all hair on your body, facial hair grows for a while, rests for a while, then falls out as a new hair grows.  These periods are called the anagen (growth), catagen (initial rest), and telogen (full rest) phases.



During the anagen phase, the hair is actively growing.  An insane amount of things effect this rate, and it isn’t exactly an even progression.  Different hairs grow at different rates.  They grow faster when you are at rest, faster still when you are asleep. They grow faster in the summer (likely due to less Vitamin D production during the winter months).  Growth slows or even pauses during illness or injury due to the body redirecting energy and nutrients to fight infection or rebuild bone, muscle or skin.  It also slows during times of stress.  This is the only “growth period,” but constitutes the longest phase for most hairs. 

The catagen phase begins as the base of the hair, the bulb, begins to die.  This can be triggered by genetic programming, when the bulb has essentially exhausted its predetermined time, or by simple lack of nutrients due to injury or illness or stress.   

The telogen phase constitutes nothing at all happening in the hair follicle.  The bulb has completely died and fused to the base of the hair.  The blood supply has been cut off.  The hair itself is held in place by simple friction.  It can easily by pulled out by brushing or combing, and will cause no pain whatsoever ever.  This phase together with the catagen phase is collectively called the “resting period,” since no growth occurs during either and it is impossible to know which is happening without removal of the hair. 

After some time, which is different for every hair and for every area of the body, anagen starts again with the growth of a new bulb which begins creating a new hair.  If the old hair hasn’t fallen out or been pulled out, it is slowly pushed out by the new growth. The following chart shows the “average” times and growth rates of hairs in various parts of the face and head.  This is averaged over various races, ages, and time periods.  Therefore, your specific growth, resting periods, and percentages WILL vary.  I’ll get into that a bit more below the chart.
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
This DOES NOT mean that half your cheek hairs won’t show up for 10 weeks after you shave. 

This means that at any one point, up to or more than half your hairs are not growing.  But, they take turns in this such that after an average of 10 weeks all your hairs have had a chance to grow some on your cheeks. To illustrate, I’ve chosen spaghetti (mostly because it is funny, and I’m hungry)… 

On the last day you shaved, all the hairs were essentially cut at or just below the surface of the skin.  In the photo below, assume the surface of the skin is the bottom edge of the binder just beneath the pasta.  For this example, I’ve selected 20 hairs (lol) that are either just about to enter the rest phase or are just about to exit.




This is one day post shave.  About half the hairs have grown out, with half growing none.



 After a week, hair 1 has started to grow, hair 2 has stopped, and the rest are still in the same state they were.



After two weeks, hair 1 is still growing, hair 2 is still resting, hair 3 has started to grow, hair 4 has stopped, and the rest are in the same state.



After 3 weeks, hair 1 is growing, hair 2 is resting, 3 is growing, 4 is resting, 5 is growing, and the rest are in the same state.



This process continues, with one hair starting as another stops until at the end of around 10 weeks the hairs look like this.

​ 

​Hairs 1 and 20 both grew for about 9 of those 10 weeks, with hair one starting a week late and hair 20 ending a week early. 
Hair 2 and hair 19 grew for 1 week of those 10, with hair 2 stopping 1 week in and hair 19 not starting until week 9.   

​This is the scientific reason behind the 13 weeks of growth suggested on the board.  Although your actual growth will vary widely, after around 13 weeks most every hair on your face will have had SOME opportunity to grow.  A random number will have grown from day 1 through week 13.  Others might have just started their growth. Now… Does this mean EVERY hair will have grown some in 13 weeks?  Not at all.  The fact is that your genetic rates are all over the place.  Some individual hairs will only be in the resting phase for 2 or 3 weeks.  Others may well rest for nearly 6 months.  Your diet, exercise, time of year, amount of sleep, health, stress level, and age will vary this as well. 
Last edited by SnowCrash on January 21st, 2017, 6:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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SnowCrash
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SnowCrash
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Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 20th, 2017, 9:33 pm #3

Most pictures you see of growing hair (including the growth phase image in the post above) are convenient lies.  Hair follicles are generally not perpendicular (90 degrees) to the skin surface.  They grow at more or less an acute angle to the skin surface as in this image.



But… even this is somewhat deceptive, since it shows a perfectly straight follicle path.  Most follicles are not straight, being more or less curved.  This curved path is part of why hair is often curly or wavy.  The below image shows some of these patterns.


 Most everyone has some number of each of these follicle paths, which is why hairs on different parts of your body can exhibit different curl or straightness… but…  there is even more to the curl vs straightness of hairs. The shape of the hair also factors into this.  Most images that you see of a hair in cross-section show a perfectly round hair shaft and core.  For most people, this is not true.  Only those of pure Asian descent have near-perfectly round hairs.  European descent hairs are more or less rounded oval in cross section.  African descent hairs are closer to a flat oval.  The follicle pattern combined with the cross section of the hair is what allows various hairs on your body to grow with differing curl and relative straightness.




The degree of the roundness varies quite a bit in most people due to mixed descent.  The following image is of a typical cross section for someone of average European descent.





So...  Can you change your growth pattern?  In other words, can you make naturally curly hair straight or straight hair curly?  Not really.  These things are programmed into each individual hair and follicle.

But... that said, there are ways to reduce the curl or cause straight hairs to curl.  An oil (like coconut, emu, olive or castor) that soaks into the hair can give it additional weight.  A stiff balm or pomade can add weight to the hair and/ or glue it together slightly to allow gravity to hold it down.  

Any other method to straigten is more or less destructive to a point:

Blow drying on gentle heat is least destructive.  This heat opens the hair cuticle allowing a brush or comb to essentially pull or tear the fibers in curled areas such that they loose some of the curve.  Over time it may weaken the hairs enough that they break.  Adding an oil before drying will minimize this to a degree.

A flat iron is possible, but is considerably more destructive than blow drying.  Depending on the heat used, the duration may or may not last long.  Generally, the longer lasting, the more damage that has been done.

Chemical straighteners litterally break the bonds in the outer layers of hairs, giving them a surface much like a corrigated straw.  This is highly destructive and weakens all the hairs.  Breakage is inevitable.

All curling methods are destructive.  The proximity to mucus membranes also make them rather dangerous, but...

A small guage curing iron may be used.  This method breaks outer bonds and litterally cooks a curl into place.  Repetition will eventually cause breakage, and the effect is generally short lived.

Curlers like those used on head hair are often employed in longer beards.  This is typically done only for competitions, and like the iron, the effective duration is short.

Chemical agents much like the "permanent" used on the head hair is so destructive and dangerous due to the nearness to the mouth that I won't do more than mention it here.

In other words, for the most part, what you grow is what you grow.  It is a direct result of all those ancestral soups before you.  Wear it with the knowledge that it is unique to you.

 
Last edited by SnowCrash on January 21st, 2017, 6:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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DanoM
Beard Jedi
DanoM
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Joined: July 3rd, 2016, 4:23 pm

January 20th, 2017, 11:02 pm #4

Every single user should read this. In fact, all new users should require themselves to read it in its entirety. Thank you for your work putting this together. When I read your initial explanation in your post, everything started to make sense. I ended up having my sides trimmed just after week 13. Now that I am past that this round, I am seeing hairs I had never seen before. Many of them. What is so neat about this is that years from now people will still be reading this, and they will come out at a better place.
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Slybeard
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Slybeard
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Joined: October 31st, 2013, 12:18 am

January 20th, 2017, 11:38 pm #5

You packed a lot of info in here. Thanks
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DanoFromCO
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DanoFromCO
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Joined: October 15th, 2005, 4:49 am

January 21st, 2017, 4:44 am #6

Wow, this deserves to be made a sticky topic, at least until we can link it in our library.
Patience shall be rewarded!

New beard growers: Check out the Rules of Beard Acquisition.
To upload and post pictures, here is a tutorial.
Do you believe in these Common Beard Myths?
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SnowCrash
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SnowCrash
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Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 21st, 2017, 6:50 am #7

DanoM wrote:
Every single user should read this. In fact, all new users should require themselves to read it in its entirety. Thank you for your work putting this together. When I read your initial explanation in your post, everything started to make sense. I ended up having my sides trimmed just after week 13. Now that I am past that this round, I am seeing hairs I had never seen before. Many of them. What is so neat about this is that years from now people will still be reading this, and they will come out at a better place.
Thanks, Man!  To be honest, I got tired of typing pieces of it... lol.  This is actually a self-serving post so that I could explain once and get it over with... but, if it helps even one, it's worth it.
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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SnowCrash
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SnowCrash
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Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 21st, 2017, 6:51 am #8

Slybeard wrote:
You packed a lot of info in here. Thanks
Totally self-serving, Sly... But no worries!
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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SnowCrash
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SnowCrash
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Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 21st, 2017, 6:54 am #9

DanoFromCO wrote:
Wow, this deserves to be made a sticky topic, at least until we can link it in our library.
Is that a reference to my use of pasta?  If so, I always stop cooking at al dente...

I'd be honored, though...  I do plan to add several sections to it, though.  I can always separate them later if you wish.

***And, yes, I did edit this, because I finally figured out what you meant.  At first it asked what on earth you meant by "sticky"... lol  I'm dense at times.
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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smedstad
Beard Wizard
smedstad
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Joined: January 10th, 2012, 12:22 pm

January 21st, 2017, 8:22 am #10

What an amazing contribution! I for one look forward to any more sections you decide to add
Stop trimming your moustache; greater glory awaits...
but if you are going to trim, do it right, go pencil...
then, of course, a nice copstache can be cool too...

My Beard and Moustache Adventures!

Tapatalk How-tos and Q&A
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baldbandit
Beard Wizard
baldbandit
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Joined: January 8th, 2016, 9:13 am

January 21st, 2017, 9:43 am #11

An excellent post sir! Thanks for adding this very useful reference!
Baldbandit's Journey                                                       
Useful Links
Library Central of Beard Growing,  
Patchy beard success stories,   
Beard Board Rules,  
Titles, and Advisors
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SnowCrash
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SnowCrash
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Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 21st, 2017, 6:40 pm #12

smedstad wrote:
What an amazing contribution! I for one look forward to any more sections you decide to add
Appreciated.  Definitely more.
baldbandit wrote:
An excellent post sir! Thanks for adding this very useful reference!
Thanks! And no worries!
Last edited by SnowCrash on January 21st, 2017, 7:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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SnowCrash
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SnowCrash
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Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 21st, 2017, 6:56 pm #13

Melanin. 

Okay, maybe that was too simple an answer, but it IS the answer for those of the TL;DR camp. 

Melanin is a rather broad term for the natural pigmentation found in most life.  There are three basic types:  eumelanin, pheomelanin, and neuromelanin.  Of these, only the first two concern us here; neuromelanin is found in the brain and its complete function remains a mystery although it has been found to bind to many toxic molecules and may therefore be a protection against them. 

Eumelanin 

There are two subtypes:  brown and black.  It is found throughout the body in various concentrations.  This is the pigment responsible for skin tone, eye color, hair color, freckles and moles.  The higher the concentration of one or both, the darker the skin, eyes or hair. 

Pheomelanin 

This is found in high concentrations in the lips, nipples, and genitals, but may be anywhere throughout the body.  It imparts a range of reddish tones.   For most genetic traits, the outcome from your parents is fairly simple.  Take the basic blood type for example.  If one parent has A type and the other O, their offspring will be either A or O. Coloration for the hair and eyes is a bit different.  Think of it as a paint color recipe.  There are only 3 colors to choose from, and the base paint is white.  The recipe might say 1 part, 2 parts, 0 parts, but doesn’t exactly specify which color goes with which measure.  The result will depend on what is available then and there.  If there is more black on the shelf, it will constitute the largest portion, the same for the others. 

Black hair: Obviously, this is the darkest pigment.  There will be large amounts of black eumelanin, but it is distributed less densely than other colors because of its darkness.  Varying amounts of brown eumelanin and pheomelanin can give it undertones that show brown-black, blue-black, red-black, or jet black in different lights. 

Brown hair: High amounts of brown eumelanin.  Much more densely distributed than an equally dark shade of black hair.  This higher density will often mean that brown hair has thicker strands than black. 

Blond hair: Low amounts of both brown eumelanin and pheomelanin.  The various proportions give tints anywhere from nearly white platinum blond to strawberry blond.  Because the amounts tend to increase with age, blond hair tends to get darker later in life.  Less than 2% of the world’s population retains blond hair into adulthood. 

Auburn hair: Essentially the same pigmentation as brown hair, but with equally concentrated pheomelanin.  Depending on the light source, it can appear red or brown or both. 

Red hair: High amounts of pheomelanin and extremely low or no black eumelanin.  True red hair has been found to be caused by a mutation of the Mc1r gene that also causes pheomelanin to be produced throughout the skin in place of eumelanin.  This causes a pinkish coloration of the skin and little to no tanning potential.  As with blond hair, less than 2% of the world’s population has true red hair, with the bulk of the gene mutation of Scottish descent (around 40% of Scotts carry the gene). 

Grey hair: Extremely small amounts of black eumelanin.  Any hair color can regress to here due to a lack of the other pigments for several different reasons.  Mix a little black with white… enough said.  Studies have shown that this phase generally begins in men in the mid-twenties.  Around 60% of men have some grey hair by age 40.  The order of greying occurs in rather specific orders:  nose hairs, head hairs, beard, body hair, then eyebrows. 

White hair: No melanin at all.  Although hair is literally colorless without melanin, the reflection and refraction of light from and through the hairs gives it a whitish appearance.  It can also appear grey due to its proximity to black or dark brown hairs and their colors reflecting from or through them.  This is the end phase of greying, when even the minimal black eumelanin stops being deposited. 

Grey and white hairs aren’t all genetic.   

Studies have shown that environmental pollutants often combine with the body’s chemistry to create peroxide.  This can actually bleach the hair pigments as they are being deposited into the hair shaft, or even as the hair emerges from the skin.  Those to whom this occurs may notice that there is a striped appearance to the hairs.  They may notice this specifically when returning from a long holiday away from their usual daily environment.  For some, simply changing shampoos will negate the bleaching.   

Stress also plays a factor.  Disaster survivors often develop rapidly whitening hair.  So too do those with stressful jobs.  One job of note is that of U.S. President.  Holders of this office show statistically improbable rapid greying after 4 or 8 years.  While part of this is believed to be due to cortisol (the hormone produced under stress) attaching to melanin and making it too large to enter into the hair follicles eventually clogging up the pathway, a substantial increase in the natural production of peroxide has also been blamed. 

Regardless of the cause, greying HAS been shown to be reversible.  Cancer patients taking the drug imatinib have shown a complete reversal of greying.  While the drug is too cost prohibitive and dangerous to be taken for the sole reversal of greying, studies are underway to determine how exactly it reverses the process.  One day soon, greying hairs might well be as simple to control as taking a daily vitamin tablet.  

Now…  the surprise red beard phenomenon.  Most likely, the reason you stopped here was because you had a sudden surprise.  No one in your family has red hair.  Your head hair is brown, or blond, or black, but you have a bright red beard.  Several things can cause this: 
  1. You actually have red hair on your head, but the brown and black pigments are drowning it out.  This means that you ARE a carrier of the red pigmentation Mc1r gene but it did not express in your head hair.  During puberty, the gene was turned on with several other genes.  Since your head hair was already growing, the black and brown eumelanin was more prominent.  You'll likely notice that your chest, armpit, and/ or crotch hair is differently colored than your scalp hair.
  2. You are producing peroxide either naturally or due to environmental pollutants.  Eumelanin is extremely easy to bleach compared to pheomelanin.  This is the reason that bleached brown or black hair will often come out red or orange; since the eumelanin is destroyed, only the pheomelanin remains.  If this is the culprit, you probably notice that your face is often dry feeling due to less oil production while your scalp is not because the oil is protecting those hairs.  You also are more likely to see red tones in your head hair or other body hair under certain lights.
  3. You are part demon bound to devour souls for all eternity.  Okay… I’m kidding, only the first two are relevant… Or am I?
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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Triibeard
Beard Wizard
Triibeard
Beard Wizard
Joined: February 27th, 2013, 6:23 am

January 22nd, 2017, 5:14 am #14

SnowCrash,

Thank you for compiling this in one place. It truly deserves to be a permanent "sticky" and practically required reading for every Beard Board participant. Great job with the research, the content, and the tables and illustrations. You obsess productively.
Triibeard's Forty (that's four-zero!) years of being bearded    (Including the recent journey from a short- to a long-beard)Introducing LEGO-Sheriff Triibeard     (The origin story for our polymeric polychromatic hero)
Sheriff Triibeard and The Case of the Missing Beard Balm   (In search of that scoundrel RiffRaff)
Sheriff Triibeard and the Masked Italian Financier   (Who is that masked man?)
Sheriff Triibeard and the Hermit Hoarder    (Consequences of acquisitiveness)
Sheriff Triibeard's own website: www.triibeard.com with visits from 16 countries so far. Thank You!


In a world of shorn faces, it is our privilege to offer those around us the exquisite opportunity to know a gentleman with a beard.
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AtlantaBeard
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AtlantaBeard
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Joined: November 18th, 2016, 4:08 am

January 23rd, 2017, 6:10 pm #15

SC - Thank you for all this work/effort.  Really good stuff.
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benuga82
Beard Friendly
benuga82
Beard Friendly
Joined: January 10th, 2017, 5:32 pm

January 24th, 2017, 2:32 am #16

I love this and my reply title says it all. I agree that everyone on this board should read this!!!

-Ben
-Ben
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jimjr007
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jimjr007
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Joined: January 17th, 2017, 8:17 pm

January 25th, 2017, 4:51 pm #17

Great information shared. Glad I took the time to read through this, definitely encouraging to know that new hairs grow through the whole 13 week process.
Follow my journey here
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SnowCrash
Beard Elite
SnowCrash
Beard Elite
Joined: December 11th, 2016, 6:46 am

January 26th, 2017, 7:19 am #18

Thanks, Gents! I'm frankly glad that anyone is reading it at all, and even moreso if it helps!
My Hirsute Happening  |  Grow to St. Patrick's Day Challenge 

Science of Beard Growth:  Facial Hair Growth Cycle | Curly vs Straight hair | Why is my beard X color? | Why can we grow beards? and other body hair function  | The hows and whys of Beard Oil  
[b]Average hair cycles and growth[/b]Area% hairs restingrest periodgrowth perioddaily growth
scalp13-1512-16 wks2-6 yrs0.35mm
eyebrow9012 wks4-8 wks0.16mm
cheeks30-5010 wks1 yr0.32mm
mustache40-456 wks16 wks0.32mm
beard/chin30-4010 wks1 yr0.38mm
Results WILL VARY by age, time of year, and genetics.
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SussexRokx
Beard Friendly
SussexRokx
Beard Friendly
Joined: January 24th, 2017, 9:16 pm

January 26th, 2017, 12:38 pm #19

Fantastic resource, and a reading must for beard brothers, new and established.
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Guest
Guest

January 26th, 2017, 4:24 pm #20

Massive pat on the back Snowy awesome work, thanks for taking the time to contribute such fascinating info - the bearded community salute you
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