Italian Puma AFV

Joined: November 3rd, 2012, 7:10 pm

October 28th, 2016, 12:55 pm #1

The Puma is a family of Italian light wheeled armoured fighting vehicle family, consisting of the Puma 6x6 and the Puma 4x4. The vehicles were developed and are produced by the Consorzio Iveco Fiat - Oto Melara for the Italian Army. First prototypes completed in 1988, with a total of five testbed vehicles being completed by 1990.
The 4x4 variant carries 3 troop members plus the driver, the 6x6 variant carries 6 troops plus driver.[1]

I'm doing the 4x4 version by Trumpeter. For such a small vehicle there is an awful lot of plastic and PE



Construction is pretty straight forward with excellent fit if parts and nice clean moulding.





Some quite complex structures. This has 18 plastic and PE parts and I don't even know what it is ?


But the fit was excellent

Some really tiny parts too. I bought a "sticky pencil" from RB Productions at our recent nationals and it came in very handy




Very useful tool for only €2

Some tiny and complex PE also. This little piece requires 30 desperate folds

Didn't go quite according to plan

But I'll hide it with a tarp or something

The side stowage bins went better


I just need to mask the vision blocks and lights and ready for priming




And apologies again for doing the small wheeled Puma rather than the huge rotary one. But it is just too big....







Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 28th, 2012, 6:03 pm

October 28th, 2016, 2:13 pm #2

Wow, that etch is some very fine work Sean. Well done :clap:

Dermot

Last edited by Dermot on October 28th, 2016, 2:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 3rd, 2012, 7:08 pm

October 28th, 2016, 2:52 pm #3

Nice try...
One suggestion - and my apology, if I am bringing owls to Athens - heat treatment of the copper fret makes wonders:
Simply hold the PE fret over lit candle until it changes colour, then throw it into water. This will take the inner tension out of the material and will make it nice soft and workable. A good idea is to do a few careful passes with sandpaper over both sides of the fret afterwards, to create some grip for superglue and paint.
Filip . . . .

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 6th, 2012, 6:20 pm

October 28th, 2016, 5:28 pm #4

Filip
I just loved the phrase bringing owls to Athens. Had to look it up and its Greek but is used in German?. Never heard it in English before. In Wexford we used to just say that's as much use as tits on a bull.

Isn't the Internet wonderful for learning entirely useless things. :P

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 3rd, 2012, 7:08 pm

October 28th, 2016, 6:08 pm #5

I know it as well as 'bringing wood to the forest...', it's used more commonly like that. I love proverbs, treasures of great knowledge spanning 100s of years in a few words.
Filip . . . .

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 3rd, 2012, 7:10 pm

October 28th, 2016, 10:27 pm #6

Bring all the owls you can Fise, I'm always open to suggestions. Is Athens known for its owl population?
Thanks, I would normally anneal the PE if doing a curved bend but never tried it doing a right angled bend on the mark before. Must remember that for the next time.







Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 6th, 2012, 6:20 pm

October 29th, 2016, 8:17 am #7

This is a carrier based Puma I see; they might want to move the old landing hook though......

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 1st, 2012, 12:05 pm

October 29th, 2016, 3:05 pm #8

Sean

Just jumped into this thread. Great work on all those fiddly little details. I too got one of Radu's lifting pencils, but haven't used it yet. (Radu has a great deal of very useful tools)

Phlip
"To boldly go..."




Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 3rd, 2012, 7:10 pm

October 29th, 2016, 5:46 pm #9

Indeed Philip. His micro saws made with PE are also great for taking very delicate bits off the sprue came in handy.



There were 5 on the fret. Took one of to try and now can't find the rest. Sure sign the work area needs a good tidy up....







Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 3rd, 2012, 9:55 pm

October 29th, 2016, 6:42 pm #10

fantastic work so far Sean, or should i say Saint Sean as you surely have the patience of one with all the fiddly PE and small pieces
Quote
Like
Share