Goodbye K.C.W.

Goodbye K.C.W.

Jordan
Jordan

March 8th, 2010, 10:30 pm #1

I just recently spoke with a friend and fellow wrestling enthusiast who informed me that Key Stone Championship Wrestling has discontinued running shows. At first I was very taken aback because I was, at one time, a very big K.C.W. fan, but then as I thought about it, I havent even considered K.C.W. for a long time so its really not that big of a surprised, however I was still saddened by this news. In the Altoona area there is one company that ran longer and more successfully than any other Independent Wrestling promotion and that was K.C.W.
As a young wrestling fan in the Altoona area I prayed for so long that a wrestling company would consistently run this large, unutilized territory on a consistent basis. Keystone Championship Wrestling answered my prayer, but it would be to a territory of jaded wresting fans. Unscrupulous bookers, such as The Apostle Jon Smith, promised wrestling in this area and could not deliver so show booker, wrestler, and company owner Casanova Kato would have his back up against the wall with those first few shows.
In the early days the shows, though they drew less than 300 people, were much better than the fans, including myself, could have ever imagined. The wrestling was high impact, intense, fast paced and, at times, excitingly brutal. The wrestling personalities were unique and believable. The booking was good, for the most part, and the psychology was solid giving the shows a nice flow that encouraged fans to continue to come and tell others about the spectacle. For me, the reason why I loved it was because I could tell that the workers loved it. They loved giving a great show to the fans, they had passion, loyalty and respect for their company and one another and they had great fun doing what they were doing. In turn, the fans loved what they were seeing. I believe that Casanova Kato inspired his workers to be brave and selfless and to take risks and be innovative. After all, this who K.C.W. experiment was just one big risk that he, himself, had taken for a dream. Being apart of the crowd you feel something electric that you couldnt quite put your finger on. You just knew you were apart of something big and exclusive and that your contribution as a fan was every bit as important as what was happening in the ring.
As time went on the booking got better, the talent got more refined, the shows got more entertaining and exciting, and the fan base grew exponentially. Soon you could see K.C.W. almost every where you looked. I myself know that just for the War Game Show of 2005 I saw leaflets in the Altoona Mirror, Posters for the show in local business, there was a TV spot that aired at the same time as WWEs Monday Night Raw, there were several Billboards that advertise K.C.W., and there was exposure for K.C.W. on the Radio as Doug Diggler talked incessantly about how great of a product K.C.W. was on his Freak Show that aired on WPRR. This quality of advertising was, not only suspected to be super expensive, but also super effective.
The peak of K.C.W. may very well have been that War Games show of 2005. The crowd was in excess of 400 patrons, which was unheard up for an independent wrestling promotion in central PA for that time without having to book any big names. The show did not disappoint. It was a fantastic display of knowing and understanding what the fans wanted and giving it to them by all the K.C.W. staff involved, but mainly it was an exercise in great booking. Kato was at the top of his game. He was doing everything right. He was going crazy advertising, his booking strategies were exciting and well thought out to produce momentum for the next show and fulfill the fans that had come on that night, and his in ring work as a performer was unparallel by anyone else on the PA independent circuit.
Kato was very brave to do all that he did for K.C.W. He took risks that would have heavy costs, but garnered great reward. He worked tirelessly and with incredible emotional endurance to make K.C.W. what it was on that night. I believe that Kato knew that if he wanted to have a company it would have to be in his vision. He vision was not cheap and it would cost him much, much time much, much, money. It would take time from his family, his friends, his occupation, and his other interests. He would self-sacrificingly burn many bridges for the greater good of his vision. I believe that Kato knew what it would take to run K.C.W. the Kato-way and when many other people would cower away from this emotionally taxing pursuit, Kato said fuck it and did it anyway. That is why I call him courageous.
Being a booker, a company owner, head of advertising, organizing ticket sales, organizing D.V.D. distribution, booking locations, being a Forman of the ring crew, owner and head trainer of a wrestling academy and being a worker who wrestled every weekend for multiple companies it a heavy cross to bare and Kato always did it with a smile. These time consuming jobs are so difficult that even one of them could have been a full-time job for a person but Kato preferred to do them all on his own. I know some people will say that oh he was a control freak but I believe that he loved wrestling so much that he knew that nobody could do these jobs as carefully and as passionately as he could and I think that he felt he owed it to the fans to give them the best K.C.W. product that he possibly could. Keep in mind that Kato did all of these duties for K.C.W. but he was also a loving father who insisted on being at every sporting event that his children had that he could attend, a good husband to his wife, an honest and hard working highwayman, and a mentor to all the boys in the back, I know because I have been there.
I was 21-year old punk when I first met Kato. I owe a lot of who I am today to him. To the boys that he trained he was more than a mentor, he was more than a friend, he was a father figure and a source of inspiration. He never made me feel bad about my shortcomings, but demanded that I reach down deep within myself to give that absolute best to the fans when I was in his ring and if I didnt I had done a disservice to myself and no one else. This lesson is one that everyone should learn.
I believe that the stress of juggling all these duties took their toll on Kato. I feel much guilt because there was little that I could have done to ease this strain on the man whod answered the prayers of wrestling fans Altoona wide. Soon the advertisements tapered off and the fans began too as well. I think that Kato was desperate for some rest but was so bound by his sense of duty and his obligation to the fans that he refused to stop pushing and this risk had the heaviest cost of all.
I would like to say that I will sorely miss K.C.W. I hope my commentary on what Ive seen does not offend anybody it was not intended to. To Kato I would like to say thanks for all that youve done for me, if I havent said it before. Lots of people bash you on this web page but I really do not think that know or understand all that youve given up to pursue your dream an, by extension, all of our dreams. We everyone else was day dreaming you had the Balls to get the wheels moving and you did not stop, regardless of the heavy costs to you personally, financially, emotionally, and spiritually. K.C.W. is not dead because of Casanova Kato. On the contrary, K.C.W. will Live forever in the hearts and minds of those who really loved it. Thank you Kato for being more to me than even my own father was.


JORDAN M. TREESE, CW-I: B.S.
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March 9th, 2010, 12:19 am #2

If KCW was that great, why is it dead?
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March 9th, 2010, 12:33 am #3

Well I guess if you would have read the post, which it is now very obvious that you didnt, you would have read that Kato took on too many responsibilities by himself and it caused him to burn out. Thats what the entire posting was about God dumb people really irritate me. Good original post though. It was very insightful.
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March 9th, 2010, 1:18 am #4

Responsibilities in the KCW? Their was no actual storyline. No training. No entertainment at the show. No growth. No expanding.

Maybe you are referring to responsibilties like running APWF out of business? Helping with the destruction of DCW? Being a burden on IWC and FNW? Maybe dry cleaing his outfit with that stupid stop sign on it? Bleaching his thinning hair?


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March 9th, 2010, 1:25 am #5

In all fairness, I doubt you actually have any inkling of what it takes to promote a company, sell tickets, book a building, keep contact with workers, set up for a shows, book shows, work shows, produce DVDs, or any of that other stuff an owner must do so why dont you just keep you blatant idiocy and ignorance to yourself. As Troy, Bubba, Feelgood or any of those other tools if Kato hurt or helped their companies and, if they are honest men, theyll have to answer with a resounding YES!
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March 9th, 2010, 1:38 am #6

It is very obvious that Kato did not have the knowledge or skills to run an Indy Fed due to the fact that he ran his into the ground. He did have the help of many others to get through his 8 years. Please do not give all the credit to one man, one idiotic man.
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March 9th, 2010, 4:47 am #7

I just recently spoke with a friend and fellow wrestling enthusiast who informed me that Key Stone Championship Wrestling has discontinued running shows. At first I was very taken aback because I was, at one time, a very big K.C.W. fan, but then as I thought about it, I havent even considered K.C.W. for a long time so its really not that big of a surprised, however I was still saddened by this news. In the Altoona area there is one company that ran longer and more successfully than any other Independent Wrestling promotion and that was K.C.W.
As a young wrestling fan in the Altoona area I prayed for so long that a wrestling company would consistently run this large, unutilized territory on a consistent basis. Keystone Championship Wrestling answered my prayer, but it would be to a territory of jaded wresting fans. Unscrupulous bookers, such as The Apostle Jon Smith, promised wrestling in this area and could not deliver so show booker, wrestler, and company owner Casanova Kato would have his back up against the wall with those first few shows.
In the early days the shows, though they drew less than 300 people, were much better than the fans, including myself, could have ever imagined. The wrestling was high impact, intense, fast paced and, at times, excitingly brutal. The wrestling personalities were unique and believable. The booking was good, for the most part, and the psychology was solid giving the shows a nice flow that encouraged fans to continue to come and tell others about the spectacle. For me, the reason why I loved it was because I could tell that the workers loved it. They loved giving a great show to the fans, they had passion, loyalty and respect for their company and one another and they had great fun doing what they were doing. In turn, the fans loved what they were seeing. I believe that Casanova Kato inspired his workers to be brave and selfless and to take risks and be innovative. After all, this who K.C.W. experiment was just one big risk that he, himself, had taken for a dream. Being apart of the crowd you feel something electric that you couldnt quite put your finger on. You just knew you were apart of something big and exclusive and that your contribution as a fan was every bit as important as what was happening in the ring.
As time went on the booking got better, the talent got more refined, the shows got more entertaining and exciting, and the fan base grew exponentially. Soon you could see K.C.W. almost every where you looked. I myself know that just for the War Game Show of 2005 I saw leaflets in the Altoona Mirror, Posters for the show in local business, there was a TV spot that aired at the same time as WWEs Monday Night Raw, there were several Billboards that advertise K.C.W., and there was exposure for K.C.W. on the Radio as Doug Diggler talked incessantly about how great of a product K.C.W. was on his Freak Show that aired on WPRR. This quality of advertising was, not only suspected to be super expensive, but also super effective.
The peak of K.C.W. may very well have been that War Games show of 2005. The crowd was in excess of 400 patrons, which was unheard up for an independent wrestling promotion in central PA for that time without having to book any big names. The show did not disappoint. It was a fantastic display of knowing and understanding what the fans wanted and giving it to them by all the K.C.W. staff involved, but mainly it was an exercise in great booking. Kato was at the top of his game. He was doing everything right. He was going crazy advertising, his booking strategies were exciting and well thought out to produce momentum for the next show and fulfill the fans that had come on that night, and his in ring work as a performer was unparallel by anyone else on the PA independent circuit.
Kato was very brave to do all that he did for K.C.W. He took risks that would have heavy costs, but garnered great reward. He worked tirelessly and with incredible emotional endurance to make K.C.W. what it was on that night. I believe that Kato knew that if he wanted to have a company it would have to be in his vision. He vision was not cheap and it would cost him much, much time much, much, money. It would take time from his family, his friends, his occupation, and his other interests. He would self-sacrificingly burn many bridges for the greater good of his vision. I believe that Kato knew what it would take to run K.C.W. the Kato-way and when many other people would cower away from this emotionally taxing pursuit, Kato said fuck it and did it anyway. That is why I call him courageous.
Being a booker, a company owner, head of advertising, organizing ticket sales, organizing D.V.D. distribution, booking locations, being a Forman of the ring crew, owner and head trainer of a wrestling academy and being a worker who wrestled every weekend for multiple companies it a heavy cross to bare and Kato always did it with a smile. These time consuming jobs are so difficult that even one of them could have been a full-time job for a person but Kato preferred to do them all on his own. I know some people will say that oh he was a control freak but I believe that he loved wrestling so much that he knew that nobody could do these jobs as carefully and as passionately as he could and I think that he felt he owed it to the fans to give them the best K.C.W. product that he possibly could. Keep in mind that Kato did all of these duties for K.C.W. but he was also a loving father who insisted on being at every sporting event that his children had that he could attend, a good husband to his wife, an honest and hard working highwayman, and a mentor to all the boys in the back, I know because I have been there.
I was 21-year old punk when I first met Kato. I owe a lot of who I am today to him. To the boys that he trained he was more than a mentor, he was more than a friend, he was a father figure and a source of inspiration. He never made me feel bad about my shortcomings, but demanded that I reach down deep within myself to give that absolute best to the fans when I was in his ring and if I didnt I had done a disservice to myself and no one else. This lesson is one that everyone should learn.
I believe that the stress of juggling all these duties took their toll on Kato. I feel much guilt because there was little that I could have done to ease this strain on the man whod answered the prayers of wrestling fans Altoona wide. Soon the advertisements tapered off and the fans began too as well. I think that Kato was desperate for some rest but was so bound by his sense of duty and his obligation to the fans that he refused to stop pushing and this risk had the heaviest cost of all.
I would like to say that I will sorely miss K.C.W. I hope my commentary on what Ive seen does not offend anybody it was not intended to. To Kato I would like to say thanks for all that youve done for me, if I havent said it before. Lots of people bash you on this web page but I really do not think that know or understand all that youve given up to pursue your dream an, by extension, all of our dreams. We everyone else was day dreaming you had the Balls to get the wheels moving and you did not stop, regardless of the heavy costs to you personally, financially, emotionally, and spiritually. K.C.W. is not dead because of Casanova Kato. On the contrary, K.C.W. will Live forever in the hearts and minds of those who really loved it. Thank you Kato for being more to me than even my own father was.


JORDAN M. TREESE, CW-I: B.S.
GOODBYE KCW....AON IS TAKING OVER PA KATO
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Timmy Richards
Timmy Richards

March 9th, 2010, 5:22 am #8

It is very obvious that Kato did not have the knowledge or skills to run an Indy Fed due to the fact that he ran his into the ground. He did have the help of many others to get through his 8 years. Please do not give all the credit to one man, one idiotic man.
Kato worked hard to get KCW off the ground and I would call his run in KCW a success. I would call KCW a sucess. Whomever said "If they were so great, how come they are dead." is simply a moron. ECW was one of the GREATEST wrestling of all time and they lasted not much longer if you think about it. So that point has no validation. Kato busts his ass working at least 3 sometimes 4 weekends a month, sometimes pulling double shots in 2 different towns. He is dedicated, and passionate. If you suck, he will tell you. That is what I like about him is the fact that he pulls no punches. You haters, just show your ignorance, if you dont like the guy thats fine. KCW was something that I enjoyed and enjoyed my time there and will live forever in the hearts of those that worked there. It was a sad day when he said he was selling his rings and such. One thing you cannot argue is NO ONE had a better run in that territory than Kato and KCW. Kato has helped me become a better referee with a few suggestions here or there, not often, only when needed. I respect Kato for what he has done. If Kato has something to say that may be of help to me I WILL LISTEN. This is how you learn. Listen to the vets. Love him or hate him (there is no in between) You gotta give him props for running as long as he did. Truth is, maybe he got burnt out. He has a great family with great kids. When it comes down to it family is important. Some may think not, but how can you bash someone for just wanting to move on to the next chapter in his life/career? Dont judge. Just shut up and give some credit where credit is due. Im not kissin ass here, just telling it from my point of view. He gave me an opportunity and is a veteran that many do look to as a mentor and such. Totally qualified to train. Say what you want. I wanna see another Altoona fed do what KCW did. I dont think I will. Just my opinion. Say whatever ya want. I just wanted to say my piece. Somthing positive instead of HATING HATING HATERS.
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March 9th, 2010, 5:33 am #9

GOODBYE KCW....AON IS TAKING OVER PA KATO
Hardly. Your TV sux, your UNTRAINED boys suck. Your product sux. I would not go to your show if I was given tickets or if you paid me. Terrible product that just continues to emberass the business with your Minor league bottom of the barrel backyard shit. Fucking get some money together when you get your SSI and make a payment to any legit wrestling school. With legit pros training you every week. I know NONE of you AON guys must not be able to afford REAL training, so is this why you continue to work there? Geez its sad, but I wanted in the biz for a long time until I finally paid my training dues and got trained properly. You guys refuse, so do you understand you are a joke to the industry? You are not taking over anything except maybe the Westmont Grove. You gonna run IWC outta Pa too? HA HA AH HAHAHAHA I continue to find so much fun at the expense of this bush league bunch of outta shape yard tards, outta shape and untrained. YOU MAKE ME SICK> YOU FUKS.
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March 9th, 2010, 6:18 am #10

better than KCW. and you are JEALOUS
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