The Scouts Again.

The Scouts Again.

Joined: November 6th, 2006, 7:52 pm

August 16th, 2010, 2:47 am #1

I am forwarding the link. No opinion offered.

http://www.ktvb.com/news/Scout-leader-f ... 36329.html
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Rob W
Rob W

August 16th, 2010, 3:08 am #2

I think that is all that I have to say. It has become kinda a scout tradition state wide to "climb the big one".

I dont have any official info, but my guess is that MOST of these scouts and their leaders have never attempted to climb any other large mountains before coming to Borah.

From an "idahosummits-forum regular" perspective, I wish there was someway that we could raise awareness to scouts and their leaders (and all newbies, really) that they need to get some proper training and experience before tackeling Borah.

Is there any thing we can do to help other groups realize that this is no easy task??



As a side note, I would venture to say that maybe 1000s of scouts and newbies have summited Borah without any trouble......these last few weeks have been kinda crazy up there.....forgive for the cliche "when it rains, it pours".
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Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

August 16th, 2010, 3:17 am #3

To go on a trip like this leaders are supposed to take the "Climb On Safety Course" beforehand. I can also help with this through my district position and an Outdoor Ethics Advocate. I go to troops to train them in outdoor skills and I can include things like mountain climbing safety in addition to Leave No Trace. Teaching Leave No Trace is my main objective but I can also do other things and as I have some decent experience in the mountain climbing area it might be a good idea to talk about it in some of the adult leadership training sessions.
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Rob W
Rob W

August 16th, 2010, 3:24 am #4

I am forwarding the link. No opinion offered.

http://www.ktvb.com/news/Scout-leader-f ... 36329.html
What do you guys think about permits for Borah??

I am not think about raising money, limiting #s on the mountain or anything like that if this were the case.

It seems that the permits used for Whitney, Hood, Rainer and other big mountains helps control #s on the hill at one given time. But, do you think the permits on these were added to increase safety and to raise awareness ????

I wish I knew the history behind issuing permits on some of the larger mountains.

Any thoughts??
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mlsl
mlsl

August 16th, 2010, 4:13 am #5

I am forwarding the link. No opinion offered.

http://www.ktvb.com/news/Scout-leader-f ... 36329.html
At least they got the photo right this time. Borah is a real mountain. What got me up it in part was a snide-ass comment a friend made that he did it at 9 years old in scouts, so of course i was going to bag it at 34. But i had also trained all summer and i didn't take it lightly, and i went with someone more experienced that had time on mountains. No amount of classwork, as you know, prepares you for real mountains. A lot of the folks going up there are just plain old lucky, scouts included. I don't know that permits would help. We had to get one for Rainier, but I think it was more of an exercise in body counting than proving you had skills...maybe that has changed.
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Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

August 16th, 2010, 4:20 am #6

I think permits might be helpful in cubing traffic on the mountain. I don't know if they'd do much for safety though. Borah really isn't a peak that should be taken lightly. Sure lots of people do it without any kind of experience but I thought it was a tough peak and as we have seen recently, there are lots of places where you can fall a long ways.
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crappyclimber
crappyclimber

August 16th, 2010, 5:32 am #7

What do you guys think about permits for Borah??

I am not think about raising money, limiting #s on the mountain or anything like that if this were the case.

It seems that the permits used for Whitney, Hood, Rainer and other big mountains helps control #s on the hill at one given time. But, do you think the permits on these were added to increase safety and to raise awareness ????

I wish I knew the history behind issuing permits on some of the larger mountains.

Any thoughts??
NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-Permits.

The mountain will sort itself out in the end and once you even start down that long UGLY road of government intervention, you will never have the same mountain again. Idaho is actually one of the BEST places to climb anywhere in the world because of the lack of permits needed--and I hope it stays that way FOREVER!!
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crappyclimber
crappyclimber

August 16th, 2010, 5:37 am #8

I think permits might be helpful in cubing traffic on the mountain. I don't know if they'd do much for safety though. Borah really isn't a peak that should be taken lightly. Sure lots of people do it without any kind of experience but I thought it was a tough peak and as we have seen recently, there are lots of places where you can fall a long ways.
If you think permits curb interest in a mountain, you have never actually been to a heavily permitted mountain--I think it draws people who generally wouldn't have had an interest in the place except "permits" were advertised as hard to get, so it attracts more people to try their luck at getting that elusive "permit"
If you can't tell, I really hate permits for climbing
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Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

August 16th, 2010, 5:39 am #9

i can see how that would be the case. I don't like permits either.
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Rob W
Rob W

August 16th, 2010, 2:07 pm #10

NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-NO-Permits.

The mountain will sort itself out in the end and once you even start down that long UGLY road of government intervention, you will never have the same mountain again. Idaho is actually one of the BEST places to climb anywhere in the world because of the lack of permits needed--and I hope it stays that way FOREVER!!
That was a lot of no's.......but I agree with ya. Just wondering.......??
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