The Pahsimeroi Front

The Pahsimeroi Front

pat
pat

October 22nd, 2010, 4:47 am #1

Last weekend was perhaps the final snowless one of 2010 in the northern Lost Rivers. George, John, and I enjoyed a brisk tromp up Gooseberry and Metaxi Peaks from Christian Gulch. It looked like winter to the south on Doubletree and Borah, but the ground was bare where we journeyed. A good time was had by all.

The Pahsimeroi Front from Gooseberry (11090):
Looking South are Peak 10750, Metaxi (10,757), Pahsimeroi Pyramid (10,749), and Petros (11,050).


George bound for Gooseberry


The White Knobs and poplars
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

October 22nd, 2010, 12:40 pm #2

More! More!
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Mike F.
Mike F.

October 22nd, 2010, 7:40 pm #3

Last weekend was perhaps the final snowless one of 2010 in the northern Lost Rivers. George, John, and I enjoyed a brisk tromp up Gooseberry and Metaxi Peaks from Christian Gulch. It looked like winter to the south on Doubletree and Borah, but the ground was bare where we journeyed. A good time was had by all.

The Pahsimeroi Front from Gooseberry (11090):
Looking South are Peak 10750, Metaxi (10,757), Pahsimeroi Pyramid (10,749), and Petros (11,050).


George bound for Gooseberry


The White Knobs and poplars
Sounds like a fun outing. congrats on getting out for the last snow free weekend. how was the road into christian gulch? I was thinking of taking my subaru up there next seasion.
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pat
pat

October 22nd, 2010, 11:40 pm #4

I believe it is possible to drive a 2WD sedan up to the our camping spot at around 7500 ft. After that, John drove an additional ~3 miles to about 8000 feet. A Subaru would likely make it. We were thinking Christian Gulch would make a good fall outing location.
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Joined: November 8th, 2007, 2:31 pm

October 23rd, 2010, 12:47 am #5

More! More!
Slideshow link:


-George
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

October 23rd, 2010, 1:03 am #6

Wow, George- you're getting fancy.
Very nice photos, by the way.

That looks like an awesome area. Agree with Pat it would make a nice Outing outing.
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Dave
Dave

October 23rd, 2010, 1:47 am #7

Last weekend was perhaps the final snowless one of 2010 in the northern Lost Rivers. George, John, and I enjoyed a brisk tromp up Gooseberry and Metaxi Peaks from Christian Gulch. It looked like winter to the south on Doubletree and Borah, but the ground was bare where we journeyed. A good time was had by all.

The Pahsimeroi Front from Gooseberry (11090):
Looking South are Peak 10750, Metaxi (10,757), Pahsimeroi Pyramid (10,749), and Petros (11,050).


George bound for Gooseberry


The White Knobs and poplars
Nice work guys! Great pics.
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Joined: March 29th, 2007, 7:48 pm

October 23rd, 2010, 3:43 pm #8

Slideshow link:


-George
...very nice....

Doesn't get better than that, does it? I love Idaho.....
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

October 26th, 2010, 12:15 am #9

Slideshow link:


-George
GeoJoPa- Your assault on the Idaho Eleveners has been followed with interest. Each new one seems to get better, right? How many have you reined in so far?

Your photo of 'zebra rock' caught my eye because it tells an interesting story of Idaho's past, its v-e-r-y distant past.

Those black and white stripes of dolomite and sandstone were lithified some 400 million years ago in the Devonian, when Idaho was near-equatorial beach front property.

Here's my interpretation:
The setting is a barrier island, like you'll find along the Southeast US coastline. As water retreated from the lagoon backbay side, sticky gooey mud flats would be exposed. Fine grain beach sand from the ocean side blew in to cover the mud. The cycle was repeated several times until deep burial. Next compression, then much later a cataclysmic 11000 foot uplift as the North American plate overrides the subducting Farallon plate. Finally, discovery by a select few Idaho mountain explorers.

My example of zebra rock (lower left) was collected from McGowan Peak, just a few miles northwest of Gooseberry Peak. The stratification is seen here in cross section.

On Gooseberry I found 'spaghetti rock' (center) which is fossilized bryozoan, a colony coral. Again, the host rock is Jefferson Dolomite. Dolomite is magnesium carbonate, similar but slightly harder than limestone which is calcium carbonate.

The nice pair of fossilized mollusks (lower right) is embedded in Mississippian limestone from No Regret Peak. While awaiting exact species identification, this perky set has, tongue in cheek, been referred to as boobrock... But enough already!
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Wes
Wes

October 26th, 2010, 7:16 pm #10

Nice work guys! Great pics.
Did that same hike last fall. Great way to get several peaks in one shot. Some of those photos are pretty stunning!
Nice Work!!
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