Peak 9115

Peak 9115

pat
pat

May 7th, 2012, 11:34 pm #1

It was 16 degrees when George and I mounted our bicycles and started the predawn ride to Stanley Lake. What a novelty it was to cycle with snowshoes, ice tools and helmets up the gated road. We needed to stop and swing the blood back into our fingers more than once. That was pleasant when compared to massaging the blood back into our toes after wading the creek at dawn. We were given a lesson in snow travel during our climb of the North Couloir of Peak 9115. There was an inch of powder at 7,000 feet covering a bullet hard base. There was 10 inches of powder at 9,000 feet on the North side. That new snow was pretty sloppy on the sunny side of the mountain by noon. We also found snowshoes quite useful for navigating the swamp at the base later in the afternoon.

Peak 9115 is a steep shoulder of McGown (photo taken a week ago on a recon trip).


George and his bike (photo taken in the afternoon after the climb)


We were leery of the big icicles hanging from the large cliff above the main couloir. So we chose a narrow slot farther to the right on the North Face.


George after traversing into the main gulley.


George in the sunny basin east of McGown.


McGown


Our route followed the narrow couloir to the right of center on the lower face and traversed left to the main couloir at mid-height. If you look closely, you can see our footprints.

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Joined: October 31st, 2011, 6:49 pm

May 7th, 2012, 11:53 pm #2

Awesome shots, especially the last one! Looks like quite a line!
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Geo
Geo

May 8th, 2012, 3:29 am #3

That back tire looks like ...I need to get out more.

I've tweaked Pat's picture a bit and added some arrows to show our route:


Here's more pictures (mostly of Pat's back side)


-George
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Anonymous
Anonymous

May 8th, 2012, 3:58 pm #4

Is there a unique classificationsystem for snow climbs, like gully or couloir climbs?
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pat
pat

May 9th, 2012, 12:39 am #5

I am not sure what you are talking about. Snow climbs are usually referenced by their steepness. Rarely are they steeper than 50 degrees. This one is no exception. It is 30-45 degrees (maybe 50 max). That is usually pretty tame. 45 degrees can be kinda scary if the snow is hard and you can't dent it with your boot.
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crappyclimber
crappyclimber

May 9th, 2012, 4:39 am #6

It was 16 degrees when George and I mounted our bicycles and started the predawn ride to Stanley Lake. What a novelty it was to cycle with snowshoes, ice tools and helmets up the gated road. We needed to stop and swing the blood back into our fingers more than once. That was pleasant when compared to massaging the blood back into our toes after wading the creek at dawn. We were given a lesson in snow travel during our climb of the North Couloir of Peak 9115. There was an inch of powder at 7,000 feet covering a bullet hard base. There was 10 inches of powder at 9,000 feet on the North side. That new snow was pretty sloppy on the sunny side of the mountain by noon. We also found snowshoes quite useful for navigating the swamp at the base later in the afternoon.

Peak 9115 is a steep shoulder of McGown (photo taken a week ago on a recon trip).


George and his bike (photo taken in the afternoon after the climb)


We were leery of the big icicles hanging from the large cliff above the main couloir. So we chose a narrow slot farther to the right on the North Face.


George after traversing into the main gulley.


George in the sunny basin east of McGown.


McGown


Our route followed the narrow couloir to the right of center on the lower face and traversed left to the main couloir at mid-height. If you look closely, you can see our footprints.
Nice job guys!! That has always been one of my favorite climbs in the Sawtooths. Your entrance into the bottom of the mountain was rather unique and a good way to mix it up a bit.
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Wes
Wes

May 9th, 2012, 3:58 pm #7

It was 16 degrees when George and I mounted our bicycles and started the predawn ride to Stanley Lake. What a novelty it was to cycle with snowshoes, ice tools and helmets up the gated road. We needed to stop and swing the blood back into our fingers more than once. That was pleasant when compared to massaging the blood back into our toes after wading the creek at dawn. We were given a lesson in snow travel during our climb of the North Couloir of Peak 9115. There was an inch of powder at 7,000 feet covering a bullet hard base. There was 10 inches of powder at 9,000 feet on the North side. That new snow was pretty sloppy on the sunny side of the mountain by noon. We also found snowshoes quite useful for navigating the swamp at the base later in the afternoon.

Peak 9115 is a steep shoulder of McGown (photo taken a week ago on a recon trip).


George and his bike (photo taken in the afternoon after the climb)


We were leery of the big icicles hanging from the large cliff above the main couloir. So we chose a narrow slot farther to the right on the North Face.


George after traversing into the main gulley.


George in the sunny basin east of McGown.


McGown


Our route followed the narrow couloir to the right of center on the lower face and traversed left to the main couloir at mid-height. If you look closely, you can see our footprints.
Nice Trip! Sounds like something Fred Beckey would have written back in the day.
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Jason
Jason

May 11th, 2012, 9:02 pm #8

It was 16 degrees when George and I mounted our bicycles and started the predawn ride to Stanley Lake. What a novelty it was to cycle with snowshoes, ice tools and helmets up the gated road. We needed to stop and swing the blood back into our fingers more than once. That was pleasant when compared to massaging the blood back into our toes after wading the creek at dawn. We were given a lesson in snow travel during our climb of the North Couloir of Peak 9115. There was an inch of powder at 7,000 feet covering a bullet hard base. There was 10 inches of powder at 9,000 feet on the North side. That new snow was pretty sloppy on the sunny side of the mountain by noon. We also found snowshoes quite useful for navigating the swamp at the base later in the afternoon.

Peak 9115 is a steep shoulder of McGown (photo taken a week ago on a recon trip).


George and his bike (photo taken in the afternoon after the climb)


We were leery of the big icicles hanging from the large cliff above the main couloir. So we chose a narrow slot farther to the right on the North Face.


George after traversing into the main gulley.


George in the sunny basin east of McGown.


McGown


Our route followed the narrow couloir to the right of center on the lower face and traversed left to the main couloir at mid-height. If you look closely, you can see our footprints.
One of my favorite early sawtooth climbs. Good job guys! Thanks for sharing
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