North Face of Jacqueline Peak--- The "hot line".

North Face of Jacqueline Peak--- The "hot line".

pat
pat

June 27th, 2010, 1:14 am #1

Three years ago I photographed an amazing couloir on the North Face of Jacqueline Peak. The "hot line" is a thin ribbon of snow from bottom to top. It cannot be seen from the approach. Last June, my son, Kevin, and I got more than half way up (and above the crux) when the sky opened up and a deluge ensued. We beat a hasty retreat in abominable weather.

Today the climb beckoned again. What a Classic! Over 1000 feet of 40-60 degree snow with two short sections of water ice, class 4/5 rock, and a waterfall too. The route does have its dangers. It is a funnel for rock fall. So go early and go fast. There is safety in speed.

My original picture from 2007 of the "hot line".
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The face is dark and eerie in the early morning. I did not see the sun until the summit. The crux is the narrow section at mid height.
[/IMG]

Kevin retreating through that section last June during a cloud burst. Note the water everywhere on the rock.
[/IMG]

Its tough to take action pictures when you are alone. This is a lame attempt in the upper couloir.
[/IMG]

Cobb, Hyndman, and Old Hyndman from the summit. There is still lots of snow on the south faces.
[/IMG]
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

June 27th, 2010, 4:28 am #2

Nice line, Pat. Good eye. Congrats on an instant classic.
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John R
John R

June 28th, 2010, 12:04 am #3

Three years ago I photographed an amazing couloir on the North Face of Jacqueline Peak. The "hot line" is a thin ribbon of snow from bottom to top. It cannot be seen from the approach. Last June, my son, Kevin, and I got more than half way up (and above the crux) when the sky opened up and a deluge ensued. We beat a hasty retreat in abominable weather.

Today the climb beckoned again. What a Classic! Over 1000 feet of 40-60 degree snow with two short sections of water ice, class 4/5 rock, and a waterfall too. The route does have its dangers. It is a funnel for rock fall. So go early and go fast. There is safety in speed.

My original picture from 2007 of the "hot line".
[/IMG]

The face is dark and eerie in the early morning. I did not see the sun until the summit. The crux is the narrow section at mid height.
[/IMG]

Kevin retreating through that section last June during a cloud burst. Note the water everywhere on the rock.
[/IMG]

Its tough to take action pictures when you are alone. This is a lame attempt in the upper couloir.
[/IMG]

Cobb, Hyndman, and Old Hyndman from the summit. There is still lots of snow on the south faces.
[/IMG]
Great climb Pat! How was the snow getting in and out of Big Basin?
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pat
pat

June 28th, 2010, 1:44 am #4

John,

The snow began at timberline in Big Basin and was pretty solid above. I hiked in on Friday evening and slept in the trees just below the snow. I began the climb by 7 AM and was on the summit less than 2 hours later. Despite warm temperatures overnight, everything was pretty solid in the wee hours. The snow softened up on the south and west slopes of Jacqueline by 10 AM and I glissaded all the way from the saddle to the creek. That was a real time saver. My guess is that by late afternoon only the steeper slopes were solid enough to walk upon. I have a feeling that by next weekend most of the soft snow will be gone and everything left will be dense enough to walk on.

One of my worries was the creek crossing. It was fine.

How was DoubleSpring Peak?

Pat
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crappyclimber
crappyclimber

June 28th, 2010, 7:37 pm #5

Three years ago I photographed an amazing couloir on the North Face of Jacqueline Peak. The "hot line" is a thin ribbon of snow from bottom to top. It cannot be seen from the approach. Last June, my son, Kevin, and I got more than half way up (and above the crux) when the sky opened up and a deluge ensued. We beat a hasty retreat in abominable weather.

Today the climb beckoned again. What a Classic! Over 1000 feet of 40-60 degree snow with two short sections of water ice, class 4/5 rock, and a waterfall too. The route does have its dangers. It is a funnel for rock fall. So go early and go fast. There is safety in speed.

My original picture from 2007 of the "hot line".
[/IMG]

The face is dark and eerie in the early morning. I did not see the sun until the summit. The crux is the narrow section at mid height.
[/IMG]

Kevin retreating through that section last June during a cloud burst. Note the water everywhere on the rock.
[/IMG]

Its tough to take action pictures when you are alone. This is a lame attempt in the upper couloir.
[/IMG]

Cobb, Hyndman, and Old Hyndman from the summit. There is still lots of snow on the south faces.
[/IMG]
Nice climb with beautiful aesthetic qualities--Well done!!
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John R
John R

June 29th, 2010, 2:26 am #6

John,

The snow began at timberline in Big Basin and was pretty solid above. I hiked in on Friday evening and slept in the trees just below the snow. I began the climb by 7 AM and was on the summit less than 2 hours later. Despite warm temperatures overnight, everything was pretty solid in the wee hours. The snow softened up on the south and west slopes of Jacqueline by 10 AM and I glissaded all the way from the saddle to the creek. That was a real time saver. My guess is that by late afternoon only the steeper slopes were solid enough to walk upon. I have a feeling that by next weekend most of the soft snow will be gone and everything left will be dense enough to walk on.

One of my worries was the creek crossing. It was fine.

How was DoubleSpring Peak?

Pat
Doublespring was a "pleasant hike" especially compared to Altair 2 weeks ago. Great weather, on top at 0945, a 1600 ft glissade, back to the car a little after noon.
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Joined: November 8th, 2007, 2:31 pm

June 29th, 2010, 2:51 am #7

John,

The snow began at timberline in Big Basin and was pretty solid above. I hiked in on Friday evening and slept in the trees just below the snow. I began the climb by 7 AM and was on the summit less than 2 hours later. Despite warm temperatures overnight, everything was pretty solid in the wee hours. The snow softened up on the south and west slopes of Jacqueline by 10 AM and I glissaded all the way from the saddle to the creek. That was a real time saver. My guess is that by late afternoon only the steeper slopes were solid enough to walk upon. I have a feeling that by next weekend most of the soft snow will be gone and everything left will be dense enough to walk on.

One of my worries was the creek crossing. It was fine.

How was DoubleSpring Peak?

Pat
Like John said, it was quite pleasant compared to Altair. It almost felt like we were cheating. We drove to about 8500' (the drive may have been the crux), cot-camped (using the newly acquired, screened, EZ-up gazebo option) under a calm and clear night, slept in until the dawn sky had a slight orange tint, climbed on mostly firm snow, enjoyed a long glissade with only one 100' horizontal interruption, and I still made it back to Caldwell in time to unload the truck, mow ½ an acre of grass, and enjoy a couple of victory beers earlier than we get back to camp on some climbs. As Jim C mentioned, the skies were unusually clear without a hint of haze, which made for awesome rubber-necking on the return drive.

Roughing it:


Critter nursery on approach:


John on the ridge above critters (Cayuse Canyon to lookers right):


The view from the top:


Endless glissadage:


We could have glissaded almost directly off the summit, but we left that line un-blemished for the BC skiers. Better hurry.
-George
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Joined: October 22nd, 2007, 1:35 am

June 29th, 2010, 3:16 am #8

Nice, guys. The living sure is easy in the LRR this time of year.

Did I mention I didn't see a single biting insect on Sunday? I take that back, the ants were biting my toes when I got back to the car and put on flip-flops.

I really like Cayuse Canyon. Only been up there once, but it left quite an impression on me. It's circuitous path is cool. As are the old trees near the bottom. I wonder how old some of those trees are? Maybe not bristlecone old, but probably pretty old. I know some tree scientists and should find out if they want to study some old ones.

There's more high elevation snow now than in May 18 2008, which was considered a good snow year. Here's the same view as one of your photos:



Thanks for leaving the slope mostly unblemished for the b-c skiers. I'm sure the canyon was thick with skiers.....

Jim
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Joined: November 8th, 2007, 2:31 pm

September 15th, 2010, 5:11 am #9

Like John said, it was quite pleasant compared to Altair. It almost felt like we were cheating. We drove to about 8500' (the drive may have been the crux), cot-camped (using the newly acquired, screened, EZ-up gazebo option) under a calm and clear night, slept in until the dawn sky had a slight orange tint, climbed on mostly firm snow, enjoyed a long glissade with only one 100' horizontal interruption, and I still made it back to Caldwell in time to unload the truck, mow ½ an acre of grass, and enjoy a couple of victory beers earlier than we get back to camp on some climbs. As Jim C mentioned, the skies were unusually clear without a hint of haze, which made for awesome rubber-necking on the return drive.

Roughing it:


Critter nursery on approach:


John on the ridge above critters (Cayuse Canyon to lookers right):


The view from the top:


Endless glissadage:


We could have glissaded almost directly off the summit, but we left that line un-blemished for the BC skiers. Better hurry.
-George
My freebie Autostich software has been giving me fits. Think I've got it figured out, at least until I shut it down.

Here's a pano from the Doublespring summit, taken 6/27/10:


-George
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

September 15th, 2010, 1:53 pm #10

Like John said, it was quite pleasant compared to Altair. It almost felt like we were cheating. We drove to about 8500' (the drive may have been the crux), cot-camped (using the newly acquired, screened, EZ-up gazebo option) under a calm and clear night, slept in until the dawn sky had a slight orange tint, climbed on mostly firm snow, enjoyed a long glissade with only one 100' horizontal interruption, and I still made it back to Caldwell in time to unload the truck, mow ½ an acre of grass, and enjoy a couple of victory beers earlier than we get back to camp on some climbs. As Jim C mentioned, the skies were unusually clear without a hint of haze, which made for awesome rubber-necking on the return drive.

Roughing it:


Critter nursery on approach:


John on the ridge above critters (Cayuse Canyon to lookers right):


The view from the top:


Endless glissadage:


We could have glissaded almost directly off the summit, but we left that line un-blemished for the BC skiers. Better hurry.
-George
Wow- you got a tent for your truck?
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