My little fire foxes

My little fire foxes

Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

June 5th, 2010, 10:46 pm #1

On Kelly Mountain, not far from where Jefferson, Madison, and Bonneville counties meet, a den of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) has been keeping area rodents in check this Spring.

A couple of weeks ago, hiking up the grassy slope, I heard this weak, distressed braying sound. Then I saw them, three juvenile foxes up on their haunches staring at me. When I returned the stare, two of them immediately dove back into their foxhole, but the one little guy bravely stood his ground.

Over the next few visits the foxes put on demonstrations for me, showing off their amazing speed, stealth, and yippy playfulness.


Today, I remembered to bring the camera. The den size had now increased to seven, and while they let me photograph them, their canid barks warned...

...Keep your distance!
All photos by Rick Baugher, 6/5/10.
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Joined: March 22nd, 2006, 12:35 am

June 6th, 2010, 2:30 am #2

Cuteness!
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

June 7th, 2010, 6:04 pm #3

"Out of breath, Uncle would announce 'Hush, I think I hear a marmot. Everybody stand still for a moment.'
Who am I to ridicule Uncle and his marmots? I do the same thing myself now, only I am more likely to put it, 'Bob, do you mind stopping for a moment? Here's a flower I'd like to look at.' What would aging mountaineers do without the alpine flora and fauna?"

Miriam Underhill, 1956
from 'Give Me The Hills'


A very well fed Marmota flaviventris/ Yellow-bellied Marmot (?)
Humboldt Peak/ South Colony Lake, Colorado
Baugher photo 9/07
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

June 7th, 2010, 8:56 pm #4

Cuteness!
Western Tanager recently returned to Eastern Idaho after spending a pleasant winter in Mexico-Costa Rica.
The red crown is his way of telling the ladies 'I'm hot!'
Apparently, he must have convinced some Idaho girl, because he's now marking out his territory and collecting nest material.... even as it rains and rains.
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

June 7th, 2010, 10:56 pm #5

Cuteness!

Ovis canadensis usainbolt
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

June 8th, 2010, 2:30 am #6

Cuteness!
Oreamnos americanus occupies some of the most rugged and remote areas of North America. Any mountaineer who takes a moment to observe this sure-footed, deft climber will come away with reverent inspiration.



In 1994 Idaho Fish & Game identified mountain goat herds in the following areas:
Pioneer/ Boulder complex
Beaverhead Range-Italian/Scott Pk area
Tendoy Range- Red Conglomerate area
Snake River Range- reintroduced in 1969
Salmon River Mountains- transplants from 1989

I have also seen Oreamnos in the northern White Cloud Peaks. Perhaps you can add other Idaho areas to this list?
Mountain goats and bighorn sheep occupy essentially the same habitat. One thing I've observed is that goats and sheep will not be found in the same area. Why is this so? Maybe someone out there can more fully speak to this phenomenon?



Mr & Mrs just under the summit of Beyers Peak 12804', Colorado.
R Baugher photos, 9/07
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Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

June 8th, 2010, 3:16 am #7

I've seen a lot of goats near Norton Peak in the Smokies west of Ketchum.
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

June 8th, 2010, 12:08 pm #8

Oreamnos americanus occupies some of the most rugged and remote areas of North America. Any mountaineer who takes a moment to observe this sure-footed, deft climber will come away with reverent inspiration.



In 1994 Idaho Fish & Game identified mountain goat herds in the following areas:
Pioneer/ Boulder complex
Beaverhead Range-Italian/Scott Pk area
Tendoy Range- Red Conglomerate area
Snake River Range- reintroduced in 1969
Salmon River Mountains- transplants from 1989

I have also seen Oreamnos in the northern White Cloud Peaks. Perhaps you can add other Idaho areas to this list?
Mountain goats and bighorn sheep occupy essentially the same habitat. One thing I've observed is that goats and sheep will not be found in the same area. Why is this so? Maybe someone out there can more fully speak to this phenomenon?



Mr & Mrs just under the summit of Beyers Peak 12804', Colorado.
R Baugher photos, 9/07
I've been seeing goats in the Sawtooths since the 70s. This one is from last fall on Mt. Sevy with SawtoothSean

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Dan
Dan

June 8th, 2010, 3:40 pm #9

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Rob W
Rob W

June 8th, 2010, 3:56 pm #10

totally kidding John!! You rock and you CLIMB like a mountain goat!
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