Invisible and Sheepshead

Invisible and Sheepshead

pat
pat

April 27th, 2010, 12:26 am #1

Ringggg! Ringggg!

Hello!

"Hey, Pat. George and I have a hankerin' for some scree climbin'. We've been readin' in idahosummits.com about the poor snow conditions in the Lost Rivers."

"Ive been readin' that too, John. I's good to know that all that snow has now pretty much melted. So let's go do what we like best... trudge scree. I've heard there is some Boone and Crockett talus this year."

"Let's go get some."

Two days later...

"Dang it, George! There's nothin' but this firm snow everywhere. I hate these damn glissades."


John and George with Invisible Peak in the background


on Invisible


Bound for Sheepshead Pk


Glissage into Swauger Gulch

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Dave
Dave

April 28th, 2010, 1:13 am #2

Nice work guys!
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pat
pat

April 28th, 2010, 2:36 am #3

Dave,

You would have liked this trip. The weather was great and the snow was firm. These peaks have an easy approach, good camping spot, and no 4-wheel drive needed. You were correct about Invisible Peak making a good spring outing objective.
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

April 28th, 2010, 3:25 am #4

Ringggg! Ringggg!

Hello!

"Hey, Pat. George and I have a hankerin' for some scree climbin'. We've been readin' in idahosummits.com about the poor snow conditions in the Lost Rivers."

"Ive been readin' that too, John. I's good to know that all that snow has now pretty much melted. So let's go do what we like best... trudge scree. I've heard there is some Boone and Crockett talus this year."

"Let's go get some."

Two days later...

"Dang it, George! There's nothin' but this firm snow everywhere. I hate these damn glissades."


John and George with Invisible Peak in the background


on Invisible


Bound for Sheepshead Pk


Glissage into Swauger Gulch
History can be plenty boring to some folks. Others, I've heard, actually enjoy it. Now that you've done this peak, maybe you too have wondered how Invisible got its name?

On the 'Geologic Sketch Map of the Mackay Region 1916' by Gray & Umpleby (a USGS publication compiled from GLO and USFS records) the big summit overlooking Pass Creek is labeled as Sheephead Peak. This may be on account of the contorted limestone strata on the peak's south face which resembles a cocked mountain sheep's head, complete with horns. Coming up Big Lost River Valley- Moore, Darlington, Leslie- it's particularly visible if you know what you're looking for. When snowfree and not socked in, it always jumps out at me.

On the other hand, in USGS publication 'Triangulation & Primary Traverse 1913-1915', TM Bannon lists the peak name as 'Invisible'. Perhaps he or others weren't able to discern the outline of the sheep's head. By the way, Invisible was one of Bannon's fabled equestrian ascents. His field notes state in part "Horses can be taken to the top in six hours by picking a route amongst the big bowlders".

On 7/4/92 yours truly trudged up that Boone & Crockett scree of Swauger Gulch and found some nice specimens of Productid brachiopod and Rugosa horn coral for the collection. I always enjoy hiking with rocks in my pack, tho I've been accused of hiking with rocks in my head. On top of 11276' found no sign of prior visitors and suggested the name Sheephead Peak as a latter day revival of Umpleby's 1916 nomenclature.

Cheers!
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

April 28th, 2010, 4:13 am #5

Ringggg! Ringggg!

Hello!

"Hey, Pat. George and I have a hankerin' for some scree climbin'. We've been readin' in idahosummits.com about the poor snow conditions in the Lost Rivers."

"Ive been readin' that too, John. I's good to know that all that snow has now pretty much melted. So let's go do what we like best... trudge scree. I've heard there is some Boone and Crockett talus this year."

"Let's go get some."

Two days later...

"Dang it, George! There's nothin' but this firm snow everywhere. I hate these damn glissades."


John and George with Invisible Peak in the background


on Invisible


Bound for Sheepshead Pk


Glissage into Swauger Gulch
Looks like a great day. I am sooo jealous.
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zdv
Joined: June 30th, 2009, 9:29 pm

April 28th, 2010, 5:56 am #6

History can be plenty boring to some folks. Others, I've heard, actually enjoy it. Now that you've done this peak, maybe you too have wondered how Invisible got its name?

On the 'Geologic Sketch Map of the Mackay Region 1916' by Gray & Umpleby (a USGS publication compiled from GLO and USFS records) the big summit overlooking Pass Creek is labeled as Sheephead Peak. This may be on account of the contorted limestone strata on the peak's south face which resembles a cocked mountain sheep's head, complete with horns. Coming up Big Lost River Valley- Moore, Darlington, Leslie- it's particularly visible if you know what you're looking for. When snowfree and not socked in, it always jumps out at me.

On the other hand, in USGS publication 'Triangulation & Primary Traverse 1913-1915', TM Bannon lists the peak name as 'Invisible'. Perhaps he or others weren't able to discern the outline of the sheep's head. By the way, Invisible was one of Bannon's fabled equestrian ascents. His field notes state in part "Horses can be taken to the top in six hours by picking a route amongst the big bowlders".

On 7/4/92 yours truly trudged up that Boone & Crockett scree of Swauger Gulch and found some nice specimens of Productid brachiopod and Rugosa horn coral for the collection. I always enjoy hiking with rocks in my pack, tho I've been accused of hiking with rocks in my head. On top of 11276' found no sign of prior visitors and suggested the name Sheephead Peak as a latter day revival of Umpleby's 1916 nomenclature.

Cheers!
Nice post... very informative and fun to read. What are some of Bannon's other impressive equestrian ascents?
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dave b
dave b

April 28th, 2010, 1:46 pm #7

History can be plenty boring to some folks. Others, I've heard, actually enjoy it. Now that you've done this peak, maybe you too have wondered how Invisible got its name?

On the 'Geologic Sketch Map of the Mackay Region 1916' by Gray & Umpleby (a USGS publication compiled from GLO and USFS records) the big summit overlooking Pass Creek is labeled as Sheephead Peak. This may be on account of the contorted limestone strata on the peak's south face which resembles a cocked mountain sheep's head, complete with horns. Coming up Big Lost River Valley- Moore, Darlington, Leslie- it's particularly visible if you know what you're looking for. When snowfree and not socked in, it always jumps out at me.

On the other hand, in USGS publication 'Triangulation & Primary Traverse 1913-1915', TM Bannon lists the peak name as 'Invisible'. Perhaps he or others weren't able to discern the outline of the sheep's head. By the way, Invisible was one of Bannon's fabled equestrian ascents. His field notes state in part "Horses can be taken to the top in six hours by picking a route amongst the big bowlders".

On 7/4/92 yours truly trudged up that Boone & Crockett scree of Swauger Gulch and found some nice specimens of Productid brachiopod and Rugosa horn coral for the collection. I always enjoy hiking with rocks in my pack, tho I've been accused of hiking with rocks in my head. On top of 11276' found no sign of prior visitors and suggested the name Sheephead Peak as a latter day revival of Umpleby's 1916 nomenclature.

Cheers!
Thanks for the great info / history, Rick!

Not that my opinion matters, but I've always liked the mysterious nature of the name "Invisible Mountain".
Sheepshead- not so dramatic. ..and while I'm offering opinions - peaks named after public officials (or any persons for that matter) are lame!

Along those lines, I'm sticking with "Mustang Peak" rather than "Howard Peak"!

If there was ever an exception, (in my deluded mind) it would be naming for someone who had a significant role in exploration or a special love for the peaks. How about "Rick Baugher Peak"!
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

April 28th, 2010, 2:57 pm #8

Thank you for the kind words. More on my personal hero Thomas More Bannon later. From day one, that big limestone hulk jutting out into Big Lost River Valley has always been so in your face VISIBLE, so why would anybody ever call it Invisible? This maybe more than anything got me into researching local place names.
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pat
pat

April 29th, 2010, 2:14 am #9

History can be plenty boring to some folks. Others, I've heard, actually enjoy it. Now that you've done this peak, maybe you too have wondered how Invisible got its name?

On the 'Geologic Sketch Map of the Mackay Region 1916' by Gray & Umpleby (a USGS publication compiled from GLO and USFS records) the big summit overlooking Pass Creek is labeled as Sheephead Peak. This may be on account of the contorted limestone strata on the peak's south face which resembles a cocked mountain sheep's head, complete with horns. Coming up Big Lost River Valley- Moore, Darlington, Leslie- it's particularly visible if you know what you're looking for. When snowfree and not socked in, it always jumps out at me.

On the other hand, in USGS publication 'Triangulation & Primary Traverse 1913-1915', TM Bannon lists the peak name as 'Invisible'. Perhaps he or others weren't able to discern the outline of the sheep's head. By the way, Invisible was one of Bannon's fabled equestrian ascents. His field notes state in part "Horses can be taken to the top in six hours by picking a route amongst the big bowlders".

On 7/4/92 yours truly trudged up that Boone & Crockett scree of Swauger Gulch and found some nice specimens of Productid brachiopod and Rugosa horn coral for the collection. I always enjoy hiking with rocks in my pack, tho I've been accused of hiking with rocks in my head. On top of 11276' found no sign of prior visitors and suggested the name Sheephead Peak as a latter day revival of Umpleby's 1916 nomenclature.

Cheers!
Rick,

You are correct. If you squint hard enough, the peak's south face does resemble "a cocked mountain sheep's head, complete with horns."

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dave bingham
dave bingham

April 29th, 2010, 3:41 am #10

Thank you for the kind words. More on my personal hero Thomas More Bannon later. From day one, that big limestone hulk jutting out into Big Lost River Valley has always been so in your face VISIBLE, so why would anybody ever call it Invisible? This maybe more than anything got me into researching local place names.
Funny how the stuff right in your face can be so hard to see!
I always figured "that can't be invisible mt, can it?"
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