Great climbs near Borah?

Great climbs near Borah?

Joined: March 9th, 2012, 6:34 pm

August 15th, 2012, 5:41 am #1

I'm thinking of heading up to climb Borah next Saturday (never been up it) and I'd like to do another peak on Sunday. Maybe a 12er, maybe not. Any suggestions on fun nearby peaks?

Thanks-
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Joined: March 9th, 2012, 6:34 pm

August 15th, 2012, 6:01 am #2

I'd prefer peaks accessible to passenger vehicles--I've got a toyota camry but could possibly borrow a 4runner (but i'd rather not pay the extra gas to get out there).
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Dan
Dan

August 15th, 2012, 4:41 pm #3

I'm thinking of heading up to climb Borah next Saturday (never been up it) and I'd like to do another peak on Sunday. Maybe a 12er, maybe not. Any suggestions on fun nearby peaks?

Thanks-
I'm not sure a 2-wheel drive (at least one you take care of) could make it to any of the other trailheads for 12ers. However, you could just stay at the Borah trailhead and do Sacajewea Peak from there. It's not a 12er, but it is pretty close.
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Joined: October 14th, 2010, 3:46 am

August 15th, 2012, 5:16 pm #4

You can get to the trail heads for each of these.
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Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

August 15th, 2012, 5:25 pm #5

Mt. Idaho is the next 12er south of Borah. When I did it we got a little Toyota car up Elkhorn creek to the TH. I don't know how smart that was but we made it.
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splattski
splattski

August 15th, 2012, 5:51 pm #6

I'm not sure a 2-wheel drive (at least one you take care of) could make it to any of the other trailheads for 12ers. However, you could just stay at the Borah trailhead and do Sacajewea Peak from there. It's not a 12er, but it is pretty close.
We drove a fully-loaded VW Eurovan to the Pahsimeroi, then over Pass Creek. Most folks call that 4WD only.
If you're skilled and just a little bit crazy you can get a 2WD car into many of the 'trailheads'. Short of that, a few extra miles of hiking never hurt anyone.
Well, almost never

C'mon, Kevin. Just how far CAN you get that Metro?
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Dan
Dan

August 15th, 2012, 9:23 pm #7

I still think it is about the car. Taking a 2012, Honda Accord Ex with alloy rims and performance tires on it to a trailhead is a completely different scenario than driving a "beat to $hit" 1998 Ford Taurus to a trailhead. The only people I know of driving 2WD cars to rugged trailheads have old, not-so-valuable cars... just sayin.
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splattski
splattski

August 15th, 2012, 9:37 pm #8

When we were younger, we always took our parents' cars.
Truly amazing where you could get those things!
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splattski
splattski

August 15th, 2012, 9:39 pm #9

A few years back, after white-knuckling my F150 up the road to the Mt. Adams, WA trailhead (that road has since been majorly improved) I pulled into the trailhead and parked next to a Honda Civic. Go figure.
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Joined: October 31st, 2011, 6:49 pm

August 15th, 2012, 10:06 pm #10

I still think it is about the car. Taking a 2012, Honda Accord Ex with alloy rims and performance tires on it to a trailhead is a completely different scenario than driving a "beat to $hit" 1998 Ford Taurus to a trailhead. The only people I know of driving 2WD cars to rugged trailheads have old, not-so-valuable cars... just sayin.
Here is a picture of my old off-roading beast!



I took that thing down many roads that it was not designed for.

On one such occasion, we were on a surf trip down the Baja Peninsula, when the ocean went fully flat. Since surfing was out of the question, we decided to drive across the peninsula so that we could swim in the Sea of Cortez (which none of us had done). Rather than drive all the way back up to Ensenada (3 hours north) to catch the paved highway, we took a "shortcut" that the AAA map described as a "graded dirt road". The road was 40 miles long and met up with the paved highway in . Anyway, it cut over some desert mountains where there was nothing other than a few burnt up old cars that had rolled down the steep slope adjacent to the road. This road was so rough that there were many points where the only way to avoid high-centering my low vehicle was to drive with enough speed so that you would slide all the way across the rock or obstacle. To complicate matters, I had put off getting new tires for my car to the point where one of the tires was so bald that the cables were showing. I was fully prepared to abandon my vehicle and escape in my friend's Subaru if necessary.

We were about halfway through the road when a farmer in a truck came driving the opposite direction from us. We found a wide enough spot to pull over and let him by, but he got out and began to talk to us. One of my friends had studied abroad in Puerto Rico and spoke excellent Spanish. They were talking and the farmer looked worried. He said "Ese camino es muy peligroso, y su coche is muy bajo!" [this road is very dangerous, and your car is very low], to which my friend immediately replied "No no, Ese [pointing to my car] es el Baja Especial!" The farmer's son, who was in the back of the truck and until that moment was rolling his eyes and looking bored, doubled over laughing. The farmer simply smiled, shrugged his shoulders, and wished us luck.

What I learned on that trip is that your car can do a lot more than you think. Unfortunately the "Baja Especial" eventually died of a broken frame, I wonder how that ever happened . . .
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