food

food

Rob
Rob

June 15th, 2010, 6:05 pm #1

Hey everyone,
This weekend I am undertaking a one-day hike up Lost River Peak. I just wanted to know what most people use for food on extensive one day hikes. Is it smart to have a big breakfast before the hike? I'm assuming whole wheat is always recommended. How many meals per day are recommended? And how big should these meals be?

It always seems like I don't eat as well as I should when I do a strenuous hike. I was just curious if there is a standard or a proven method that works for anyone else.
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Dan
Dan

June 15th, 2010, 6:18 pm #2

I usually eat very well the night before and drink a lot of water. I am a meat and potatoes guy, but others on here will do pizza and pasta type meals before a big climb.

As far as the hike itself goes... I would say no on the whole wheat. Yuck! You have to eat things that sound good to you or your not going to want to eat them as you get really tired or if your stomach is a bit quesy.

So I always pack good stuff that never sounds bad. Jerky, peanuts, peanut M&Ms, snickers, cheese and crackers, etc... Another thing I used to do when I was really hitting the mountains hard, was to pack gu and eat a pack of it once an hour. That worked well too and gu tastes good and you have to drink water with it.
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Rob W
Rob W

June 15th, 2010, 6:20 pm #3

Hey everyone,
This weekend I am undertaking a one-day hike up Lost River Peak. I just wanted to know what most people use for food on extensive one day hikes. Is it smart to have a big breakfast before the hike? I'm assuming whole wheat is always recommended. How many meals per day are recommended? And how big should these meals be?

It always seems like I don't eat as well as I should when I do a strenuous hike. I was just curious if there is a standard or a proven method that works for anyone else.
It is good to have a good breakfast before going. I have always done oatmeal and done fine (except for the time I ditched oatmeal and had cereal on Lil Sister and didnt feel well all day).

Personally, I think the key is to eat and drink very regularly throughout the hike. Make sure you pack things to eat that you REALLY love.....cause sometimes eating is a chore.

Your probably gonna burn more calories than you can put in!

Personal faves for me on a day hike:
Hydrolite mixed with water
CLif bars and clif shots
Gu when I am feeling crappy
Jerky
Bagels
Swedish Fish are the Best!
Trail Mix

Now, if you can get Steve W. to cook you some salmon and rice the night before, you are gonna be in hiking HEAVEN!!
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crappyclimber
crappyclimber

June 15th, 2010, 7:03 pm #4

Hey everyone,
This weekend I am undertaking a one-day hike up Lost River Peak. I just wanted to know what most people use for food on extensive one day hikes. Is it smart to have a big breakfast before the hike? I'm assuming whole wheat is always recommended. How many meals per day are recommended? And how big should these meals be?

It always seems like I don't eat as well as I should when I do a strenuous hike. I was just curious if there is a standard or a proven method that works for anyone else.
I usually make a stop at the gas station on the way out of town for a bag of pork rinds, a coke or Mountain Dew, some fried chicken and maybe a bottle of gatorade.
But this diet takes years of conditioning, so you may want to stick to the traditional food sources.
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Kevin Coble
Kevin Coble

June 15th, 2010, 7:33 pm #5

Hey everyone,
This weekend I am undertaking a one-day hike up Lost River Peak. I just wanted to know what most people use for food on extensive one day hikes. Is it smart to have a big breakfast before the hike? I'm assuming whole wheat is always recommended. How many meals per day are recommended? And how big should these meals be?

It always seems like I don't eat as well as I should when I do a strenuous hike. I was just curious if there is a standard or a proven method that works for anyone else.
Teak & Dan Cummings, Bruce Anderson, and myself did/attempted Super-Gully on Lost River last Sunday.

Snow started at about 9500'. It was a medium crust on top of sugar. I made sure we were headed down before it got too soft. If temperatures in the valley are above 70, I wouldn't stay on the snow past 11 a.m. or maybe noon. We were up to the false summit and down off the snow before 11 ourselves. There was evidence of wet-slab avalanches (minor ones though), and rockfall happened all around us starting about 10 a.m.

The ridge from the false summit to the true summit is wind-blown corniced. Probably doable if you are carefull and pay attention to where your stepping, but was not attempted this trip (time, having been up there before, wanting to get down before the snow softened, pucker factor, etc.)

Have fun and be safe...
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

June 15th, 2010, 7:40 pm #6

Hey everyone,
This weekend I am undertaking a one-day hike up Lost River Peak. I just wanted to know what most people use for food on extensive one day hikes. Is it smart to have a big breakfast before the hike? I'm assuming whole wheat is always recommended. How many meals per day are recommended? And how big should these meals be?

It always seems like I don't eat as well as I should when I do a strenuous hike. I was just curious if there is a standard or a proven method that works for anyone else.
Although during 3am starts I sometimes forget or get lazy, leaving me scrounging the bottom of my pack for ancient powerbars, I prefer to eat "real food" when I hike. My favorite is the "Extraordinary bagel sandwich" found here:
http://www.splattski.com/overview/recipes.html

A few other suggestion/tips:
As mentioned by others, things that require water are good (as long as you have some): Gu, salty snacks, dill pickles (yum)
If you are prone to cramps, something with extra salt can be a good idea: nuts, some crackers, Gatorade, etc.
I tend to like moist, easy to chew food, especially when I am low on gas. If you want sweets, try Rasberry Newtons or some soft-type chocolate chip cookies (dry ones are harder to eat and inhaling crumbs can be a bummer). Or tangerines!
Take more time to eat. Get comfortable before you start eating. Enjoy the scenery. If you are in a hurry, you tend to eat less. On a long day, that can sneak up on you in most unpleasant ways.

As for breakfasts... I find I do a lot of one-day dashes, so I try to carry a breakfast with me in the car so I don't start out hungry. Ideally, I'd eat something resembling a real meal, such as oatmeal with some nuts and raisins. Maybe add some peanut butter. You want some fat in there so that it "sticks to your ribs." If I'm full, I start a a little slower, which for me is a good thing.
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Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

June 15th, 2010, 8:57 pm #7

Teak & Dan Cummings, Bruce Anderson, and myself did/attempted Super-Gully on Lost River last Sunday.

Snow started at about 9500'. It was a medium crust on top of sugar. I made sure we were headed down before it got too soft. If temperatures in the valley are above 70, I wouldn't stay on the snow past 11 a.m. or maybe noon. We were up to the false summit and down off the snow before 11 ourselves. There was evidence of wet-slab avalanches (minor ones though), and rockfall happened all around us starting about 10 a.m.

The ridge from the false summit to the true summit is wind-blown corniced. Probably doable if you are carefull and pay attention to where your stepping, but was not attempted this trip (time, having been up there before, wanting to get down before the snow softened, pucker factor, etc.)

Have fun and be safe...
So would you say the risk of avalanche is greater than it usually would be this time of year since the snow hasn't melted off as much?
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Kevin Coble
Kevin Coble

June 15th, 2010, 9:41 pm #8

It is not that it has not melted off as much - snow level is not abnormal for the time of year. It is more that it has come late, with a wet layer (compounded by it raining on the snow lately) over a non-consolidated (sugar snow) base. The firmness of the crust doesn't allow the warm air in to melt the lower layers. The slab softens, and is a heavy layer on a pile of small ball-bearings. It is thinning at the sides, and you can almost skip between the exposed scree piles in places. We did not see any slides, just evidence of previous ones (obscuring any evidence of any ski or boot tracks - so probably recent)

The crust was thick enough last Sunday to hold together perfectly fine until it had time to soften. That is why I recommend being down (at least off the snow) before noon...

Our schedule started hiking about 5 a.m. We hit the snow about 6:30. Up top at 10. Off of the snow at 11. Beers at the car at 12:30

Caveat: I am not an avalanche forcaster, nor can I claim major experience or training with snow condition determination.
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Joined: December 20th, 2007, 3:45 pm

June 15th, 2010, 11:48 pm #9

I usually make a stop at the gas station on the way out of town for a bag of pork rinds, a coke or Mountain Dew, some fried chicken and maybe a bottle of gatorade.
But this diet takes years of conditioning, so you may want to stick to the traditional food sources.
Don't forget your post workout meal of mystery burritos and pizza sticks!
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Joined: December 20th, 2007, 3:45 pm

June 16th, 2010, 12:05 am #10

Hey everyone,
This weekend I am undertaking a one-day hike up Lost River Peak. I just wanted to know what most people use for food on extensive one day hikes. Is it smart to have a big breakfast before the hike? I'm assuming whole wheat is always recommended. How many meals per day are recommended? And how big should these meals be?

It always seems like I don't eat as well as I should when I do a strenuous hike. I was just curious if there is a standard or a proven method that works for anyone else.
gels and beef jerky with lots of water is what I like when I am out. But I usually supplement with OPF (other peoples food). This works great if your partner packs in Real Food and will have extra. It doesn't work well if both people are mooches. Then you just sit there trading sad looks until you realize neither of you has any Real Food. Also, look surprised when they pull out a thermos. Then you say, "Wow! You lucky bastard, you have coffee!" They will usually give you some of what they have.

Will the following people please ignore this post: Chris, splattski, Wes C., Bob, crappyclimber, Marc, Brad, Tom and anyone else that I may mooch off of.
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