Cutthroats & Couloirs - powder edition

Cutthroats & Couloirs - powder edition

Joined: October 22nd, 2007, 1:35 am

June 7th, 2012, 4:32 am #1

C & C is often done with corn snow or summer snow. But sometimes you get lucky and do it in powder, as fellow IOF'er Chris R. and I did today.

Unseasonably cool weather brought snow down low:


We weren't the only ones out sliding around. I was feeling slightly foolish ski touring with a fishing pole when the lakes were still covered in ice, but this beaver must have felt more so looking for open water at 8000':


We skied boot top powder that stayed dry until the early afternoon:







When it started to get gloppy, we broke out the rods:



Caught just one little brookie that we returned:


Still great skiing even after getting gloppy:




A repeat this coming weekend?

Jim
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splattski
splattski

June 7th, 2012, 11:58 am #2

Jim-
I think we've all been trained to each year look forward to your C & C season. Keep up the good work.

john
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pat
pat

June 7th, 2012, 2:35 pm #3

C & C is often done with corn snow or summer snow. But sometimes you get lucky and do it in powder, as fellow IOF'er Chris R. and I did today.

Unseasonably cool weather brought snow down low:


We weren't the only ones out sliding around. I was feeling slightly foolish ski touring with a fishing pole when the lakes were still covered in ice, but this beaver must have felt more so looking for open water at 8000':


We skied boot top powder that stayed dry until the early afternoon:







When it started to get gloppy, we broke out the rods:



Caught just one little brookie that we returned:


Still great skiing even after getting gloppy:




A repeat this coming weekend?

Jim
Jim,

You take such great photos...crisp images and clear action shots. What kind of camera do you use? I use a small, cheap Nikon Coolpix 14 mp. I can't tell if it's the camera or the photographer, but the pictures suck when compared to yours.

Pat
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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 7th, 2012, 11:40 pm #4

The camera having something to do with the picture is like the oven having something to do with the meal. The camera is simply a tool... just like an ice axe or a crampon you must learn how to use the tool. I've seen stunning pictures taken with a camera phone as opposed to a legit DSLR. Your camera is more than capable, just learn how to use it.

http://www.noupe.com/photography/40-out ... phone.html
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Joined: October 22nd, 2007, 1:35 am

June 8th, 2012, 12:33 am #5

Jim,

You take such great photos...crisp images and clear action shots. What kind of camera do you use? I use a small, cheap Nikon Coolpix 14 mp. I can't tell if it's the camera or the photographer, but the pictures suck when compared to yours.

Pat
Thanks, Pat.

I have a point-and-shoot, Panasonic DMC-ZR3. I don't want to carry anything bigger than the small pocket on the hip belt of my pack, allowing quick and frequent access. I know very little about photography and didn't even own a camera until a few years ago.

I agree with Anon to a degree that a camera is only a tool. Quality of most of my photos is due to being in scenic spots, and recognizing the scenic value, framing the photo, choosing the best zoom, and setting the light meter so that the photo is not over- or underexposed. It's also due to the large number of photos I take each outing. It's not unusual for me to take 500-1000 photos on a scenic day that I whittle down to dozen good ones.

But like any tool there are better and worse options. The thing I like best about my camera for action shots is the ability to take rapid fire photos. At full resolution, I can take 4 photos in just over a second. Release the button and then take another 4. At lower resolution, it takes an unlimited number of photos at a more rapid clip. Getting multiple chances at catching the perfection action shot makes a huge difference.

Jim
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pat
pat

June 8th, 2012, 12:51 am #6

Thank you for the information. My camera does not do the rapid fire pictures, nor is it wide angle. I see that your camera is for sale for $149. That is a good deal.

http://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-DMC-ZR3 ... 258&sr=8-2

pat
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Geo
Geo

June 8th, 2012, 2:22 am #7

also helps



I tweaked your photo a bit with Picasa with a couple of button clicks for side-by-side demonstration purposes. So much easier today than the manipulation that has taken place in darkrooms since photography was invented.

You took a nice shot!
-George
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pat
pat

June 8th, 2012, 3:31 pm #8

Thanks George. I will play around with some software on the originals. The pictures you see are without any editing.

BTW. That photo shows the "snow flutes" I tried to describe in an earlier post. Nick is just about to descend the steep leeward side of one and the white strip behind him is the steep side of another. Since the climb, I went on the web and read other accounts of climbing the N. Face. They were all done in the fall with more icy conditions and most state the final couloir is the crux. At this time with the face covered with snow, the crux is BY FAR the traverse below the final headwall. It is much steeper than the rest of the climb. While not difficult, it is certainly the "mental" crux.
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Joined: October 22nd, 2007, 1:35 am

June 11th, 2012, 2:53 am #9

C & C is often done with corn snow or summer snow. But sometimes you get lucky and do it in powder, as fellow IOF'er Chris R. and I did today.

Unseasonably cool weather brought snow down low:


We weren't the only ones out sliding around. I was feeling slightly foolish ski touring with a fishing pole when the lakes were still covered in ice, but this beaver must have felt more so looking for open water at 8000':


We skied boot top powder that stayed dry until the early afternoon:







When it started to get gloppy, we broke out the rods:



Caught just one little brookie that we returned:


Still great skiing even after getting gloppy:




A repeat this coming weekend?

Jim
Today was remarkably similar to Wednesday:







Just a bit more foggy with flat light:



There were moments of visability:



Ho-hum, more powder skiing in June:





Solar radiation eventually turned the snow to cream cheese that skied real nice:







Fishing was slow again:



Guess the fish are lying low until summer gets serious.

May and June have been the best parts of the ski season, so far.
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