Unidentified Boys found Jan 14, 1953 in Vancouver, B.C.

Joined: June 20th, 2004, 10:13 pm

January 23rd, 2006, 1:22 am #1

doenetwork.us/cases/68umbc.html The Doe Network: Case File 68UMBC Reconstructed Image of Victim Unidentified White Male Located on January 14, 1953 in Vancouver, British Columbia Canada Cause of death was homicide; the victim and his unidentified brother both died as a result of blunt force trauma to their skulls. Both victims had been deceased since approximately the fall of 1947. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Vital Statistics Estimated age: 7 - 10 years old Approximate Height and Weight: N/A Distinguishing Characteristics: Both children are thought to have had light hair. Dentals: Available Clothing: The boys' clothing had deteriorated by the time their remains were discovered. Both children were wearing brown Oxfords with white crepe rubber soles, identical belts and leather aviation helmets were also found on them, only one flying helmet had goggles. Both wore a type of zipper jacket or sweater. Left: Model of murder victim wearing a red tartan jacket, leather helmet and cream or fawn corduroy slacks.; Right: One of the two boys found murdered in Stanley Park in 1953 was wearing this shoe. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Case History The victim and his unidentified brother were located in a brush-filled area of Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia Canada in January 1953. Their heights, weights and eye colors are undetermined due to skeletal remains located at the scene. The children were covered by what appeared to be a woman's raincape. The bodies were laying in a straight line with their feet almost close together and their heads at opposite directions. Found among the bodies was a little blue tin lunchbox, the paper lining rotted to a pulpy mess. Also there was a small worn rusty hatchet of the type used by shinglers or lathers, it's handle broken in 2 pieces. The axe was most likely used as the murder weapon in these cases, as one victim's skull had a wound to the back of the head which the axe fit in exact proportions. The other skull was fractured by what may have been the hammer of the axe. The victim described in Case File 69UMBC was initially believed to be a female child; however, DNA testing conducted in 1998 proved that victim was indeed male and the brother of this victim. Vancouver police wish to identify a woman & 2 boys who may or may not have been involved with this case. In 1949 or 1950, a man who worked in a logging camp, who was with his buddy, picked up a woman with 2 children. During the ride, she had told the men that she had been in trouble with the Mission police for vagrancy charges. They learned that either one or both her children at sometime attended Cedar Valley school and that she lived on Cherry Street in Mission, B.C. There is the possibility that the woman had meant "Vag C", which in the criminal code at that time meant prostitution. The only description available for this woman is that she had "red hair". The 2 boys who were with her were about 6 & 7 years old and at least one wore an aviator flying helmet. Because of this lead, the police managed to find the family name of "Grant", but this lead was exhausted after speaking to surviving family members. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Investigators If you have any information concerning this victim's identity, please contact: Vancouver Police Department 604-717-3321 All information may be submitted anonymously. Source Information: Vancouver Police Department Source Information: Crimestoppers Vancouver Sun Ret. Sgt. Brian Honeybourn http://doenetwork.us/cases/69umbc.html The Doe Network: Case File 69UMBC Reconstructed Image of Victim Unidentified White Male Located on January 14, 1953 in Vancouver, British Columbia Canada Cause of death was homicide; the victim and his brother both died as a result of blunt force trauma to their skulls. Both victims had been deceased since approximately the fall of 1947. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Vital Statistics Estimated age: 7 - 10 years old Approximate Height and Weight: N/A Distinguishing Characteristics: Light hair. Dentals: Available Clothing: The boys' clothing had deteriorated by the time their remains were discovered. Both children were wearing brown Oxfords with white crepe rubber soles, identical belts and leather aviation helmets were also found on them, only one flying helmet had goggles. Both wore a type of zipper jacket or sweater. The coat on this child had a grey-green lining and tie strings around the waist. Left: Model of murder victim wearing a red tartan jacket, leather helmet and cream or fawn corduroy slacks.; Right: One of the two boys found murdered in Stanley Park in 1953 was wearing this shoe. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Case History The victim and his unidentified brother, were located in a brush-filled area of Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia Canada in January 1953. Their heights, weights and eye colors are undetermined due to skeletal remains located at the scene. The children were covered by what appeared to be a woman's raincape. The bodies were laying in a straight line with their feet almost close together and their heads at opposite directions. A woman's shoe and an axe were also found at the scene. The axe was most likely used as the murder weapon in these cases, as one victim's skull had a wound to the back of the head which the axe fit in exact proportions. The other skull was fractured by what may have been the hammer of the axe. This victim described in this Case File was initially believed to be a female child, as seen by the feminine hairstyle shown in the reconstructed image above. DNA testing conducted in 1998 proved that this victim was indeed male and the brother of the victim profiled in Case File 68UMBC. Vancouver police wish to identify a woman & 2 boys who may or may not have been involved with this case. In 1949 or 1950, a man who worked in a logging camp, who was with his buddy, picked up a woman with 2 children. During the ride, she had told the men that she had been in trouble with the Mission police for vagrancy charges. They learned that either one or both her children at sometime attended Cedar Valley school and that she lived on Cherry Street in Mission, B.C. There is the possibility that the woman had meant "Vag C", which in the criminal code at that time meant prostitution. The only description available for this woman is that she had "red hair". The 2 boys who were with her were about 6 & 7 years old and at least one wore an aviator flying helmet. Because of this lead, the police managed to find the family name of "Grant" but this lead was exhausted after speaking to surviving family members. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Investigators If you have any information concerning this victim's identity, please contact: Vancouver Police Department 604-717-3321 All information may be submitted anonymously. Source Information: Vancouver Police Department Crimestoppers Vancouver Sun Ret. Sgt. Brian Honeybourn
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Joined: June 20th, 2004, 10:13 pm

January 23rd, 2006, 1:26 am #2

www.vancourier.com/issues...03nn9.html Murdered 'babes' likely victims of prostitute mom By Sandra Thomas Staff writer Half a century ago, the skeletal remains of two young children were found in Stanley Park, their bodies covered in a cheap fur coat, with a small axe and a woman's shoe lying next to them. One skull had a wound in the back that matched the axe edge exactly. The second was fractured, likely from the axe handle. Their clothes had rotted, as had the small World War II leather flying helmets and lunch box also found at the scene. The medical examiner working on the case concluded the children had been there since 1947 and listed them as a boy and a girl, seven to 10 years old. In fact, they were two boys, brothers-a key mistake that likely cost investigators their case. The murders remain unsolved, although a retired Vancouver police investigator has a theory as to who killed the children, known as the Babes in the Woods. Brian Honeybourn, a Vancouver Police Department sergeant assigned to the B.C. Unsolved Homicide Unit in 1996, says he's sure it was the children's mother, a prostitute from Mission."I think their mother whacked the kids because she couldn't be bothered with them anymore," he said. In 1953, the same year the children's remains were found, police got a solid lead from a logger from Mission who said that in 1947, he had picked up a woman and two young boys hitchhiking, drove them around Stanley Park and eventually dropped them off there. Unfortunately, the man's statement was discounted as police continued to search for details of a missing brother and sister."He even said they were wearing flying helmets, but because it was two little boys, that evidence was never considered," Honeybourn said. In 1996, he investigated the Mission lead and found out the woman had been charged with vagrancy several times."Vagrancy C was what they called prostitution at the time," Honeybourn said. "It looks like she was Mission's town prostitute." He dug through the records of Cedar Valley elementary school to see if two brothers had not returned to school after the Christmas break, but was unsuccessful."But that doesn't mean much," he said. "It's possible the youngest one wasn't attending school yet, so there would be no record of him anyway." Investigators would have continued searching for a boy and a girl if, in 1998, Honeybourn hadn't enlisted the help of Dr. David Sweet, a dentist with the Bureau of Legal Dentistry at UBC. Sweet was able to extract pulp from the children's teeth, and DNA testing proved the Babes in the Woods were two boys."I don't want to disrespect medical examiners, but that's not the only time I've seen this mistake happen," he said. "When I'm talking to young guys in the field, I tell them to always get DNA. It's the only way you can know for sure." The children's' remains had been on display at the Vancouver Police Department's Centennial Museum for years, which didn't sit well with Honeybourn. After Sweet took all the DNA samples he needed, the determined sergeant decided to give the boys a proper burial."I'm not overly religious but I knew that being on display in a museum wasn't a proper place for a burial," he said. "So I seized them out of the museum and had them cremated." Honeybourn then took a police boat out in the ocean near Kits Beach where he scattered their ashes. He said the fact the annual children's festival was taking place at the time was a nice coincidence."I got some criticism for doing that and some people asked me why I didn't scatter their ashes in Stanley park, but I told them, 'These kids were murdered there-why would they want to be buried there?'" he said. "I guess you can't please everyone." Despite the fact the 56-year-old Abbotsford resident retired from the force two years ago, he often still thinks about the Babes in the Woods. He said it's likely the mother is dead, but if he could find a lead on her burial site, DNA could provide the link."I want to give those kids a name," he said. Honeybourn will share more secrets and stories of the Babes in the Woods Aug. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in the Alice MacKay Room at the Central Library, 350 Georgia St. The free event was organized to promote the library's One Book, One Vancouver program. This year's selection is Timothy Taylor's novel Stanley Park, which includes a subplot based on the Babes in the Woods case. Taylor will also be on hand to speak about his book.
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Joined: June 20th, 2004, 10:13 pm

January 23rd, 2006, 4:38 pm #3

http://doenetwork.us/cases/69umbc.html The Doe Network: Case File 69UMBC Reconstructed Image of Victim Unidentified White Male Located on January 14, 1953 in Vancouver, British Columbia Canada Cause of death was homicide; the victim and his brother both died as a result of blunt force trauma to their skulls. Both victims had been deceased since approximately the fall of 1947. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Vital Statistics Estimated age: 7 - 10 years old Approximate Height and Weight: N/A Distinguishing Characteristics: Light hair. Dentals: Available Clothing: The boys' clothing had deteriorated by the time their remains were discovered. Both children were wearing brown Oxfords with white crepe rubber soles, identical belts and leather aviation helmets were also found on them, only one flying helmet had goggles. Both wore a type of zipper jacket or sweater. The coat on this child had a grey-green lining and tie strings around the waist. Left: Model of murder victim wearing a red tartan jacket, leather helmet and cream or fawn corduroy slacks.; Right: One of the two boys found murdered in Stanley Park in 1953 was wearing this shoe. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Case History The victim and his unidentified brother, were located in a brush-filled area of Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia Canada in January 1953. Their heights, weights and eye colors are undetermined due to skeletal remains located at the scene. The children were covered by what appeared to be a woman's raincape. The bodies were laying in a straight line with their feet almost close together and their heads at opposite directions. A woman's shoe and an axe were also found at the scene. The axe was most likely used as the murder weapon in these cases, as one victim's skull had a wound to the back of the head which the axe fit in exact proportions. The other skull was fractured by what may have been the hammer of the axe. This victim described in this Case File was initially believed to be a female child, as seen by the feminine hairstyle shown in the reconstructed image above. DNA testing conducted in 1998 proved that this victim was indeed male and the brother of the victim profiled in Case File 68UMBC. Vancouver police wish to identify a woman & 2 boys who may or may not have been involved with this case. In 1949 or 1950, a man who worked in a logging camp, who was with his buddy, picked up a woman with 2 children. During the ride, she had told the men that she had been in trouble with the Mission police for vagrancy charges. They learned that either one or both her children at sometime attended Cedar Valley school and that she lived on Cherry Street in Mission, B.C. There is the possibility that the woman had meant "Vag C", which in the criminal code at that time meant prostitution. The only description available for this woman is that she had "red hair". The 2 boys who were with her were about 6 & 7 years old and at least one wore an aviator flying helmet. Because of this lead, the police managed to find the family name of "Grant" but this lead was exhausted after speaking to surviving family members. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Investigators If you have any information concerning this victim's identity, please contact: Vancouver Police Department 604-717-3321 All information may be submitted anonymously. Source Information: Vancouver Police Department Crimestoppers Vancouver Sun Ret. Sgt. Brian Honeybourn
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Joined: June 20th, 2004, 10:13 pm

January 23rd, 2006, 8:06 pm #4

websleuths.com/forums/sho...417&page=1
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Joined: June 20th, 2004, 10:13 pm

April 19th, 2006, 3:09 pm #5

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Joined: June 20th, 2004, 10:13 pm

July 13th, 2012, 8:06 pm #6

This is an old newspaper article I found.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=7P ... +boy&hl=en
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