Madchester legend comes to Edinburgh

Madchester legend comes to Edinburgh

Joined: July 1st, 2012, 3:27 pm

July 1st, 2012, 3:40 pm #1

Tom Hingley formally of the Inspiral Carpets will be doing a gig at Sneaky Pete's in Edinburgh on 5th July a cool wee venue in the Cowgate area. I think there has been a lot of interest in the gig so would be best to get a ticket otherwise it is £10 on the door. There will be to local support acts and the doors open at 7 tickets can be purchased from Ripping Records, Tickets Scotland and Ticketweb.

I missed out on Stone Roses tickets but was a big fan of the Inspirals as well so will be heading down to this gig and thought I would let others no. I have seen him before and his set was really good did a mixture of his new stuff and acoustic versions of Inspirals songs plus some Madchester classics such as Sit Down by James.
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boon
boon

July 1st, 2012, 4:36 pm #2

bit strong that innit?
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IBEX
IBEX

July 1st, 2012, 5:30 pm #3

Leg End.
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Joined: April 15th, 2006, 12:28 pm

July 1st, 2012, 6:40 pm #4

bit strong that innit?
The misuse of the word 'legend' irritates me, in general.

"Legendary: a nonhistorical or unverifiable story handed down by tradition from earlier times and popularly accepted as historical."

Like Robin Hood, or King Arthur, or Cyclops, or the Gorgons. They are not, in themselves, *legends*, they are 'legendary', they are characters in legends.

George Best is not a legend, because a) he's not a story in himself, and, b) there is verifiable proof of his existence and his exploits.

Tom Hingley cannot be, by any definition of the word, 'a legend'. That's even before anyone starts worrying about whether he might have achieved any form of elevated status as a result of association with Inspiral Carpets. Which, of course, he hasn't.


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Joined: April 15th, 2006, 12:28 pm

July 1st, 2012, 6:44 pm #5

Legend : a nonhistorical or unverifiable story handed down by tradition from earlier times and popularly accepted as historical.
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IBEX
IBEX

July 1st, 2012, 7:25 pm #6

but i don't you and you don't know me.

a person whose fame or notoriety makes him a source of exaggerated or romanticized tales or exploits
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Joined: April 15th, 2006, 12:28 pm

July 1st, 2012, 8:07 pm #7

That pretty much includes everybody who's ever lived, though.

It's devaluing those that are genuinely legendary, by over-use of the term. Fame inflation, if you like.

If you're going to accept that words can be generalised to the nth degree, you're going to end up writing sentences such as, "but i don't you and you don't know me." - I have no idea what you're getting at with that.
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Ibex.
Ibex.

July 1st, 2012, 9:33 pm #8

Is one word.
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derekb
derekb

July 1st, 2012, 9:39 pm #9

Proof that Pumpo isn't the grammar nazi.





























































Or is it?
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pumpo
pumpo

July 2nd, 2012, 3:26 pm #10

Is one word.
Actually, according to the Oxford English Dictionary (New Shorter), either version is acceptable. However, as I've not claimed to be perfect in terms of writing in English, merely irritated by the misuse (cheers) of the word 'legend', I don't really see your point. Do people who misuse hyphens particularly irritate you? You've not said.

Personally, I don't feel that the hyphen I mistakenly added changed the meaning of the word, or made it difficult to understand what I was getting at. 'Over-use' doesn't have a different meaning to 'overuse', it's not like 'recover' and 're-cover'. Which is why the OED gives both as acceptable.

by the way, I enjoyed your attempt at pre-empting (cheers) any grammatical errors with your unnecessary full stop, decapitalised 'IBEX' and, shall we say, keeping it brief, but you've forgotten that the 'Message Title' field, as the first word of your sentence already has the capital letter needed for the beginning of the sentence, your capitalised 'I' of 'is', is incorrect.

Nobody's perfect, I'm not the Grammar Nazi, 'legend' means 'story', I can't really work out why 'overuse' wouldn't need a hyphen, as it's a compound noun; I would expect that its non-hyphenation was a relatively modern development, possibly a result of people's inability to use them. However, as a fallible person, I'm happy for the Grammar Nazi to point me to the metaphorical shower block for reprogramming.
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