Morgan
Morgan

March 21st, 2014, 12:15 pm #61

Wrong again. 'Football' is a count noun, as are, 'applause', 'dancing' and 'chaos'.

Just not in the way that I used them. Which is exactly the same thing as using 'beer' as a count noun in terms of 'I want a beer'.

Continually attempting to clarify why you don't want clarity does not get away from the fact that you're only arguing with yourself.
Well you are now making completely erroneous statements. Funnily enough I was the one searching for clarity, that 'beers' is grammatically correct and suggesting otherwise is false.
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Joined: April 15th, 2006, 12:28 pm

March 21st, 2014, 6:04 pm #62

Erroneous statements? Not so. I'll explain one of them to you and I'll explain why 'beers' isn't a count noun in the way that you think it is.

1. 'Footballs/Football'

Footballs, as in the spherical objects that are kicked. 'The club had a range of promotional footballs'. More than one football.
Football, as in the game. 'All the results from this afternoon's football coming up'. More than one game may be played.

Both plural, both valid. But if you said, 'i'm going to watch the footballs results', that would be incorrect, even though 'footballs' is a word that indicates 'football' in the plural. See?

2. 'Beers'

If you were to say you were going to have wine with your dinner, that would suggest that you are going to drink an unspecified quantity of wine with your dinner.

If you said you were going to have some wines with your dinner, that would suggest you are going to be drinking a variety of wines with your dinner.

Now, apply the same logic to 'beer/beers'.

Yes, people who don't really understand subtleties might well assume what you assume, but they would be incorrect.

'Beers' exists due to there being a variety of 'beers', in exactly the same way that 'wines' exists: in order for people to be able to construct sentences about a variety of beers/wines/footballs.

All Labradors are dogs, but not all dogs are Labradors. 'Beers/wines/footballs' are all valid words, but not in any context that you want.

It's too complicated for you and you don't understand. Don't worry, I don't understand how nothing became something during the Big Bang, but I do understand why my lack of understanding doesn't necessarily disprove the Big Bang theory.
Last edited by pumpo on March 21st, 2014, 6:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Billy Big Bollocks
Billy Big Bollocks

April 6th, 2014, 11:16 pm #63

I'm not sure what you're getting at, Billy. Could you be a bit more specific please?
yes certainly, i used to log onto another roses forum but i was put off by the main moderator who i found to be a twat for want of a better word.
no humour allowed, no winding up others (see previous point) no criticism of the roses allowed

are the main reasons why i didnt like it there although i still browse and am a fan of made of scone who seems to navegate through the problems mentioned above while not appearing on their radar

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Billy Big Bollocks
Billy Big Bollocks

April 6th, 2014, 11:18 pm #64

I have it like you. With a toothbrush up my arse. Then I shit myself in a tent whilst on a camping trip to the Lake District. Then after my girlfriend has cleaned up the mess, i ask her to suck me off. That is how you do, yes? Or have I missed anything out?
oh that made me chuckle
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Morgan
Morgan

April 7th, 2014, 1:30 pm #65

Erroneous statements? Not so. I'll explain one of them to you and I'll explain why 'beers' isn't a count noun in the way that you think it is.

1. 'Footballs/Football'

Footballs, as in the spherical objects that are kicked. 'The club had a range of promotional footballs'. More than one football.
Football, as in the game. 'All the results from this afternoon's football coming up'. More than one game may be played.

Both plural, both valid. But if you said, 'i'm going to watch the footballs results', that would be incorrect, even though 'footballs' is a word that indicates 'football' in the plural. See?

2. 'Beers'

If you were to say you were going to have wine with your dinner, that would suggest that you are going to drink an unspecified quantity of wine with your dinner.

If you said you were going to have some wines with your dinner, that would suggest you are going to be drinking a variety of wines with your dinner.

Now, apply the same logic to 'beer/beers'.

Yes, people who don't really understand subtleties might well assume what you assume, but they would be incorrect.

'Beers' exists due to there being a variety of 'beers', in exactly the same way that 'wines' exists: in order for people to be able to construct sentences about a variety of beers/wines/footballs.

All Labradors are dogs, but not all dogs are Labradors. 'Beers/wines/footballs' are all valid words, but not in any context that you want.

It's too complicated for you and you don't understand. Don't worry, I don't understand how nothing became something during the Big Bang, but I do understand why my lack of understanding doesn't necessarily disprove the Big Bang theory.
I missed this. I understand what a count noun is, so am a bit bemused why you are trying to explain it to me+. You seem to be saying that beer as a count noun is only correct when describing varieties of beer. Wines and beers do not have to be different varieties for them to be countable, they can be counted by the receptacle++. Beers are counted by the pint or glass primarily*, and that is why they are count noun**. They could also be different varieties and counted on that basis. They key is can they be counted, thus are a count noun and thus beers being grammatically correct.




Pumpo edits

+ it's because you are mistaken. You *don't* know what a count known is and you also don't realise that you don't know what a count noun is used for.

++ yes. This is why 'I drank 5 pints of beer' is fine. You wouldn't say, 'I drank 5 pints of beers', would you? The receptacle is being counted, which provides clarity. Clarity is why we have language rules, otherwise we might as well just grunt and point.

* primarily can't be two things simultaneously. Primary means 'first', not first and second.

**<i></i> this is where your argument falls down. If you need further clarification of the quantity in terms of the receptacle used, it's an ineffective count noun. Which is what leads me to think that you are mistaken in terms of your first sentence.
Last edited by pumpo on April 8th, 2014, 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 15th, 2006, 12:28 pm

April 7th, 2014, 5:56 pm #66

yes certainly, i used to log onto another roses forum but i was put off by the main moderator who i found to be a twat for want of a better word.
no humour allowed, no winding up others (see previous point) no criticism of the roses allowed

are the main reasons why i didnt like it there although i still browse and am a fan of made of scone who seems to navegate through the problems mentioned above while not appearing on their radar
On my occasional viewings of the get along gang board, I too am almost always most impressed by Made of Scone. Mind you, I'm a cunt, so what do I know?
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Billy Big Bollocks
Billy Big Bollocks

April 8th, 2014, 2:02 am #67

indeed
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Joined: April 15th, 2006, 12:28 pm

April 8th, 2014, 6:55 am #68

I missed this. I understand what a count noun is, so am a bit bemused why you are trying to explain it to me+. You seem to be saying that beer as a count noun is only correct when describing varieties of beer. Wines and beers do not have to be different varieties for them to be countable, they can be counted by the receptacle++. Beers are counted by the pint or glass primarily*, and that is why they are count noun**. They could also be different varieties and counted on that basis. They key is can they be counted, thus are a count noun and thus beers being grammatically correct.




Pumpo edits

+ it's because you are mistaken. You *don't* know what a count known is and you also don't realise that you don't know what a count noun is used for.

++ yes. This is why 'I drank 5 pints of beer' is fine. You wouldn't say, 'I drank 5 pints of beers', would you? The receptacle is being counted, which provides clarity. Clarity is why we have language rules, otherwise we might as well just grunt and point.

* primarily can't be two things simultaneously. Primary means 'first', not first and second.

**<i></i> this is where your argument falls down. If you need further clarification of the quantity in terms of the receptacle used, it's an ineffective count noun. Which is what leads me to think that you are mistaken in terms of your first sentence.
When in a hole, stop digging. Nothing to say about 'footballs'?

Do you eat cheeses?

If you don't get it by now, I don't think you ever will. Don't say nobody showed you how and why it works.
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Morgan
Morgan

April 8th, 2014, 9:03 am #69

What about footballs? Football describes the game, football can also describe the ball, numerous balls equals footballs. And?

Yes I eat cheese and cheeses, so what?
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Joined: April 15th, 2006, 12:28 pm

April 8th, 2014, 11:41 am #70

You eat cheese and you eat cheeses, so what?

There's a difference. Which is why we have the word 'cheese' and the word 'cheeses'. Otherwise, what would be the point of the distinction? They mean different things. That's why they're different words.

You tell me, do you cut smaller pieces of cheeses off a big lump of cheese? No, you don't. 'Cheeses' relates to a variety of different types of cheese. If you eat 'some cheeses', you've eaten a variety of cheeses.

That's why 'cheeses' is different to 'cheese'.

"I have eaten some cheese". The implication that I've eaten a quantity of one type of cheese.

"I have eaten some cheeses". The implication that I've eaten a quantity of various different types of cheese.

Are you really struggling with this? If I were you, I'd pretend I was only winding me up and cut my losses at this point. Make the most of what you've got. It doesn't sound like much.
Last edited by pumpo on April 8th, 2014, 11:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
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