Zero green--or something else

.

Zero green--or something else

Joined: March 9th, 2005, 11:02 pm

February 14th, 2018, 6:44 pm #1

I am preparing for a new project, an A6M5, done in--guess what?--grey and green. Thanks to our friends at Wiki I cam across an interesting end-of-war color photograph of a group of scrapped 52s (attached, with luck). I was struck by the darkness of the "green" in the photo as well as the uniformity of color across the different birds.

I know period photos can be notorious as references. But in this one the colors of the non-aircraft portions such as grass look about right to my eye. I suppose it is possible that this group of Zeros were in some special ops unit, night fighters for example, and painted nonstandard IJN green. I have to look hard to see anything that can be described as green on these birds.

What do you think?

BTW, it has been a long, long time since I last posted in the forum. Glad to see familiar names can still be found.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:A6M5_scrapped.jpg
Last edited by Abledog on February 14th, 2018, 6:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 10th, 2005, 11:29 pm

I think you're right on.

February 14th, 2018, 7:07 pm #2

Very dark green, black-green really, for topsides. Some sources give two slightly different shades for Mitsubishi-built and Nakajima-built planes (approximately FS X4052 and X4077 respectively). The great majority of Model 52s were built by Nakajima and can be most easily recognized by the upper/lower color demarcation on the rear fuselage: Nakijima's curves upward to the leading edge of the stabilizer; Mitsubishi's continues straight back.

Light gray for bottoms, widely referenced as close to FS 36307 (at least for planes built by Nakajima). Some sources say early Mitsubishi-built Model 52s had bottoms painted in the same grayish-greenish color used as overall color on early variants (often referenced as close to 16350) and that later Mitsubishi-built planes used a light bluish gray close to 36375 (which is US Light Ghost Gray).

Before anybody howls in protest, I emphasize that the FS references are given as approximations only.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 3:54 pm

no protest howling by anyone...use the IJN Swatches cited:

February 14th, 2018, 7:22 pm #3


http://angelof.web.fc2.com/subw117-1.htm (Japanese)

http://angelof.web.fc2.com/subw117-2.htm (English)

The two greens used by most IJN aircraft were D2 and D3. The Nakajima A6M5 changed from lower surface M0 to J3. So watch for the subtile changes.

HTH,
David Aiken
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 1:56 pm

Nakajima green

February 15th, 2018, 2:55 am #4

I am preparing for a new project, an A6M5, done in--guess what?--grey and green. Thanks to our friends at Wiki I cam across an interesting end-of-war color photograph of a group of scrapped 52s (attached, with luck). I was struck by the darkness of the "green" in the photo as well as the uniformity of color across the different birds.

I know period photos can be notorious as references. But in this one the colors of the non-aircraft portions such as grass look about right to my eye. I suppose it is possible that this group of Zeros were in some special ops unit, night fighters for example, and painted nonstandard IJN green. I have to look hard to see anything that can be described as green on these birds.

What do you think?

BTW, it has been a long, long time since I last posted in the forum. Glad to see familiar names can still be found.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:A6M5_scrapped.jpg
The colour used by Nakajima is very dark, with a definite blue cast to it. The Irving behind is also in a similar overall colour. These aircraft don't seem to belong to a night fighter unit and the rest of the aircraft appear to have standard markings.

Chris
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 3:54 pm

be sure to 'attach' a manufacturer name to a color...NOT

February 15th, 2018, 3:21 am #5

There is no such thing as AICHI gray-green, nor KAWANICHI blue-GREEN...no NAKAJIMA green.

Suggest to use the IJN color swatch notation.
HTH...
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Joined: February 10th, 2006, 10:51 pm

Hmmmm, "Zero green"?

February 15th, 2018, 12:26 pm #6

I am preparing for a new project, an A6M5, done in--guess what?--grey and green. Thanks to our friends at Wiki I cam across an interesting end-of-war color photograph of a group of scrapped 52s (attached, with luck). I was struck by the darkness of the "green" in the photo as well as the uniformity of color across the different birds.

I know period photos can be notorious as references. But in this one the colors of the non-aircraft portions such as grass look about right to my eye. I suppose it is possible that this group of Zeros were in some special ops unit, night fighters for example, and painted nonstandard IJN green. I have to look hard to see anything that can be described as green on these birds.

What do you think?

BTW, it has been a long, long time since I last posted in the forum. Glad to see familiar names can still be found.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:A6M5_scrapped.jpg
After studying this photo, I can see that the colors and the exposure "undulate" from one side of the frame to the other and it's too saturated. It was also taken in an overcast sky situation. How can you make any specific color judgments at all? In my opinion all you can really say is that these aircraft appear to have been painted a couple of different variations of dark green. To my eye, you can't definitely determine anything about the colors beyond that.
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Joined: March 9th, 2005, 11:02 pm

I hear ya Grumpy

February 15th, 2018, 5:16 pm #7

Which explains my cautionary note about photographs in the original question. I am avoiding specific color judgments. However, my general color judgment is that IJN dark green was probably darker--a lot darker--than I had thought. The second bird back in the picture. The dark green fuse is not much different from the black (or blue-black) cowl. I'm not sure that faults in the photograph explain this.I recall reading (don't ask me where) awhile back that as the war progressed, Japanese aircraft green became progressively darker until it was almost black by war's end. I didn't give much credence to the note then, until now.Thanks to you and all who commented on my question.
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Joined: March 5th, 2005, 5:40 am

This might interest you

February 15th, 2018, 11:24 pm #8

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