YA-7F cockpit and avionics references

.

YA-7F cockpit and avionics references

Joined: December 27th, 2002, 11:44 pm

October 12th, 2017, 1:57 pm #1

I am in the early stages of a 1/48 YA-7F Super Corsair II project. I have quite a few reference photos from walkarounds of the one at the Hill AFB museum. What I lack are photos of the cockpit and fuselage avionic bays. Do any of you have or know where I can find these photos? Where significant changes made compared to the A-7D? Thanks.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: April 3rd, 2005, 11:12 pm

October 12th, 2017, 5:41 pm #2

of the A-7F proposal when they showed up at Edwards. There were no systems upgrades, so I assume the avionics and cockpit were essentially unchanged. '039 did have a spin recovery chute fitted, a control panel for doing BIT and activating/deploying the chute should have been installed in the upper left of the front panel.

These airframes should also have had onboard recorders for test data. In many aircraft, this would replace the cannon ammunition drum, but I don't know where it was installed on these aircraft.

Sven
Old Viper Tester
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 27th, 2005, 8:00 pm

October 12th, 2017, 6:21 pm #3

I am in the early stages of a 1/48 YA-7F Super Corsair II project. I have quite a few reference photos from walkarounds of the one at the Hill AFB museum. What I lack are photos of the cockpit and fuselage avionic bays. Do any of you have or know where I can find these photos? Where significant changes made compared to the A-7D? Thanks.
While supporting a ground test on the YA-7F, he walked up to the FTE, gave the jet a once-over and said, "I see you guys have re-invented the F-8." The engineer was not amused...
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 27th, 2005, 7:41 pm

October 12th, 2017, 10:55 pm #4

It was too little, too late, but it had some interesting details like the jet engine starter installation, which could be used to run and test the aircraft systems without starting the main engine. Regrettably, there was serious degradation of LTV's ability to build the prototypes, largely due to transferring many experienced engineers and workers to more profitable and likely to succeed projects. Some of the problems were simply embarrassing for the second oldest aircraft manufacturer in the US. The company had lost a lot of its former expertise due to retirements and RIFs due to the winding down of many military projects.
Quote
Like
Share