What does comedian Gilbert Godfried, Howard Stern & our hobby have to do with one another?

What does comedian Gilbert Godfried, Howard Stern & our hobby have to do with one another?

Joined: May 18th, 2007, 1:28 am

May 15th, 2012, 1:52 pm #1

The former voice of the Aflac Duck was on Howards show awhile ago talking about the circumstances of his being fired due to his unfortunate choice jokes he tweeted about the Tsunami disaster in Japan. Somehow the conversation drifted around to the relationship each had with their dads, and Godfried related the following story, which I will paraphrase to the best of my ability.

"My father owned a hardware store in Coney Island, New York City. He was not much of a business man and the store's location was on an out-of-the-way side street, not anywhere near the Cyclone (the famous wooden roller coaster in the Coney Island amusement park on the boardwalk). He never seemed to have much a customer base, but he did manage at least one thing very shrewdly. During the 1960s, at the height of the model airplane glue-sniffing era, New York City, along with other municipalities around America, passed a law that a kid had to buy a model kit, if he wanted to buy a tube of that good ole high-inducing model glue. My father had only one old, beat-up model kit in the store, but plenty of glue. A glue-sniffing kid would come in and buy the kit in order to get the more coveted glue, then go around the corner and dump the kit in my dad's store's garbage can, before slipping off to get high. My father noticed the kit laying atop the garbage, dusted it off and put it back on the store shelf for his next hobby sale. He must have sold that same model kit at least twenty times. It was his biggest money maker."

I remember those days when it got harder to buy model airplane glue, because of the abuse by the glue-sniffing underworld of every major city. Luckily, the mom and pop stores in my old neighborhood in the Ironbound section of Newark, NJ, did not pay much attention to the law in this regard and I was always able to get a tube when I needed it.

Anybody else remember those days?

P.S. If have not heard the Tsunami joke, it went something like, I just broke up with my Japanese girlfriend the other day, but Im not very sad. Another one will come floating along soon.

Apparently, AFLAC, which has a sizable customer base in Japan, was not amused for some reason. Because the practice is fraught with danger, I neither tweet, nor twat.
Last edited by PolishMikeD on May 15th, 2012, 1:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 26th, 2004, 4:41 pm

May 15th, 2012, 5:26 pm #2

occurred across the US and it's hobby shops. I used to work at Hobby Fair when I was in my mid teens, and we did the same thing. The shop rear entrance was a dead end alley at our end and at the other open end, that's where the dumpsters were. We knew who the modelers were and what the others were after. So we'd sell them a kit, mostly Monogram kits, either armor or planes, and off they'd go out the back. We'd wait about 5 minutes, go out and check the bin and almost every time we'd pegged a buyer as a sniffer, there would be the kit. What was really fun was remembering the characters, and selling them the same kit multiple times. Oh, the stories I can tell of the characters that wandered in and out of that shop. And the owner, Richard Miller, he was a story all on his own. Damn good times growing up in the San Fernando Valley............
McLents
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Joined: March 9th, 2005, 1:02 am

May 15th, 2012, 11:30 pm #3

The former voice of the Aflac Duck was on Howards show awhile ago talking about the circumstances of his being fired due to his unfortunate choice jokes he tweeted about the Tsunami disaster in Japan. Somehow the conversation drifted around to the relationship each had with their dads, and Godfried related the following story, which I will paraphrase to the best of my ability.

"My father owned a hardware store in Coney Island, New York City. He was not much of a business man and the store's location was on an out-of-the-way side street, not anywhere near the Cyclone (the famous wooden roller coaster in the Coney Island amusement park on the boardwalk). He never seemed to have much a customer base, but he did manage at least one thing very shrewdly. During the 1960s, at the height of the model airplane glue-sniffing era, New York City, along with other municipalities around America, passed a law that a kid had to buy a model kit, if he wanted to buy a tube of that good ole high-inducing model glue. My father had only one old, beat-up model kit in the store, but plenty of glue. A glue-sniffing kid would come in and buy the kit in order to get the more coveted glue, then go around the corner and dump the kit in my dad's store's garbage can, before slipping off to get high. My father noticed the kit laying atop the garbage, dusted it off and put it back on the store shelf for his next hobby sale. He must have sold that same model kit at least twenty times. It was his biggest money maker."

I remember those days when it got harder to buy model airplane glue, because of the abuse by the glue-sniffing underworld of every major city. Luckily, the mom and pop stores in my old neighborhood in the Ironbound section of Newark, NJ, did not pay much attention to the law in this regard and I was always able to get a tube when I needed it.

Anybody else remember those days?

P.S. If have not heard the Tsunami joke, it went something like, I just broke up with my Japanese girlfriend the other day, but Im not very sad. Another one will come floating along soon.

Apparently, AFLAC, which has a sizable customer base in Japan, was not amused for some reason. Because the practice is fraught with danger, I neither tweet, nor twat.
That's real sad. I grew up making balsa models in the fiftys. Using testors formuler B or Ambroid glue that I never once thought of doing anything other than making a model.When I got a Comet model finished( after many band aids using my dads used gillett blue blades) and got out the Testors or Aero Gloss dope I can remember My Mother yelling to Me to open a window. I don't ever remember getting high. I guess thing started going south with kids in the sixtys.

Just an old fart missing the simpler times.
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Joined: October 7th, 2007, 4:55 am

May 16th, 2012, 2:46 am #4

The former voice of the Aflac Duck was on Howards show awhile ago talking about the circumstances of his being fired due to his unfortunate choice jokes he tweeted about the Tsunami disaster in Japan. Somehow the conversation drifted around to the relationship each had with their dads, and Godfried related the following story, which I will paraphrase to the best of my ability.

"My father owned a hardware store in Coney Island, New York City. He was not much of a business man and the store's location was on an out-of-the-way side street, not anywhere near the Cyclone (the famous wooden roller coaster in the Coney Island amusement park on the boardwalk). He never seemed to have much a customer base, but he did manage at least one thing very shrewdly. During the 1960s, at the height of the model airplane glue-sniffing era, New York City, along with other municipalities around America, passed a law that a kid had to buy a model kit, if he wanted to buy a tube of that good ole high-inducing model glue. My father had only one old, beat-up model kit in the store, but plenty of glue. A glue-sniffing kid would come in and buy the kit in order to get the more coveted glue, then go around the corner and dump the kit in my dad's store's garbage can, before slipping off to get high. My father noticed the kit laying atop the garbage, dusted it off and put it back on the store shelf for his next hobby sale. He must have sold that same model kit at least twenty times. It was his biggest money maker."

I remember those days when it got harder to buy model airplane glue, because of the abuse by the glue-sniffing underworld of every major city. Luckily, the mom and pop stores in my old neighborhood in the Ironbound section of Newark, NJ, did not pay much attention to the law in this regard and I was always able to get a tube when I needed it.

Anybody else remember those days?

P.S. If have not heard the Tsunami joke, it went something like, I just broke up with my Japanese girlfriend the other day, but Im not very sad. Another one will come floating along soon.

Apparently, AFLAC, which has a sizable customer base in Japan, was not amused for some reason. Because the practice is fraught with danger, I neither tweet, nor twat.
I cannot begin to imagine why someone would mess up their mind and body for the sake of a momentary thrill.
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Joined: November 10th, 2006, 3:04 pm

May 16th, 2012, 3:07 am #5

ca 1987. This guy walked in, and there was no question he was stoned to the gills. He staggered out into the lanes. On a saturday night. Every lane was in use. He got hit by a bowling ball...hard, bit it didn't even phase him. The police were called, and responded in short order. They were able to take him away. He got hit and killed by a car out on route 440 two days later....stoned out of his skull.

"The FANS are fighting back!!!"
"The SECURITY GUARDS are fighting back!!!"
"The PEANUT VENDORS are fighting back!!!"
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Joined: June 11th, 2005, 3:19 pm

May 16th, 2012, 3:10 am #6

The former voice of the Aflac Duck was on Howards show awhile ago talking about the circumstances of his being fired due to his unfortunate choice jokes he tweeted about the Tsunami disaster in Japan. Somehow the conversation drifted around to the relationship each had with their dads, and Godfried related the following story, which I will paraphrase to the best of my ability.

"My father owned a hardware store in Coney Island, New York City. He was not much of a business man and the store's location was on an out-of-the-way side street, not anywhere near the Cyclone (the famous wooden roller coaster in the Coney Island amusement park on the boardwalk). He never seemed to have much a customer base, but he did manage at least one thing very shrewdly. During the 1960s, at the height of the model airplane glue-sniffing era, New York City, along with other municipalities around America, passed a law that a kid had to buy a model kit, if he wanted to buy a tube of that good ole high-inducing model glue. My father had only one old, beat-up model kit in the store, but plenty of glue. A glue-sniffing kid would come in and buy the kit in order to get the more coveted glue, then go around the corner and dump the kit in my dad's store's garbage can, before slipping off to get high. My father noticed the kit laying atop the garbage, dusted it off and put it back on the store shelf for his next hobby sale. He must have sold that same model kit at least twenty times. It was his biggest money maker."

I remember those days when it got harder to buy model airplane glue, because of the abuse by the glue-sniffing underworld of every major city. Luckily, the mom and pop stores in my old neighborhood in the Ironbound section of Newark, NJ, did not pay much attention to the law in this regard and I was always able to get a tube when I needed it.

Anybody else remember those days?

P.S. If have not heard the Tsunami joke, it went something like, I just broke up with my Japanese girlfriend the other day, but Im not very sad. Another one will come floating along soon.

Apparently, AFLAC, which has a sizable customer base in Japan, was not amused for some reason. Because the practice is fraught with danger, I neither tweet, nor twat.
They had kids come in that they KNEW were huffers. One day a kid comes up with a wad of glue tubes and puts them on the counter to pay... a friend of mine who was in the military part time, looked at the tubes, then looked at the huffer

School project?

Anyways... one day the owner finally was fed up with selling glue to kids he knew were abusing it, so he issued an edict... and the next time a kid they knew was a huffer threw down some tubes of glue, I believe (this from my memory) he charged him something like fifty-six dollars for about seven bucks worth of glue.

Word got around, apparently, because after a few of those, the problem subsided considerably!

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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 1:34 pm

May 16th, 2012, 9:38 am #7

The former voice of the Aflac Duck was on Howards show awhile ago talking about the circumstances of his being fired due to his unfortunate choice jokes he tweeted about the Tsunami disaster in Japan. Somehow the conversation drifted around to the relationship each had with their dads, and Godfried related the following story, which I will paraphrase to the best of my ability.

"My father owned a hardware store in Coney Island, New York City. He was not much of a business man and the store's location was on an out-of-the-way side street, not anywhere near the Cyclone (the famous wooden roller coaster in the Coney Island amusement park on the boardwalk). He never seemed to have much a customer base, but he did manage at least one thing very shrewdly. During the 1960s, at the height of the model airplane glue-sniffing era, New York City, along with other municipalities around America, passed a law that a kid had to buy a model kit, if he wanted to buy a tube of that good ole high-inducing model glue. My father had only one old, beat-up model kit in the store, but plenty of glue. A glue-sniffing kid would come in and buy the kit in order to get the more coveted glue, then go around the corner and dump the kit in my dad's store's garbage can, before slipping off to get high. My father noticed the kit laying atop the garbage, dusted it off and put it back on the store shelf for his next hobby sale. He must have sold that same model kit at least twenty times. It was his biggest money maker."

I remember those days when it got harder to buy model airplane glue, because of the abuse by the glue-sniffing underworld of every major city. Luckily, the mom and pop stores in my old neighborhood in the Ironbound section of Newark, NJ, did not pay much attention to the law in this regard and I was always able to get a tube when I needed it.

Anybody else remember those days?

P.S. If have not heard the Tsunami joke, it went something like, I just broke up with my Japanese girlfriend the other day, but Im not very sad. Another one will come floating along soon.

Apparently, AFLAC, which has a sizable customer base in Japan, was not amused for some reason. Because the practice is fraught with danger, I neither tweet, nor twat.
The non toxic, lemony scented stuff that wouldn't glue Sh!^ together....

Cheers,

Max Bryant

"You'll Love My Wingnuts!"
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Joined: April 18th, 2005, 1:46 pm

May 16th, 2012, 11:32 am #8

The former voice of the Aflac Duck was on Howards show awhile ago talking about the circumstances of his being fired due to his unfortunate choice jokes he tweeted about the Tsunami disaster in Japan. Somehow the conversation drifted around to the relationship each had with their dads, and Godfried related the following story, which I will paraphrase to the best of my ability.

"My father owned a hardware store in Coney Island, New York City. He was not much of a business man and the store's location was on an out-of-the-way side street, not anywhere near the Cyclone (the famous wooden roller coaster in the Coney Island amusement park on the boardwalk). He never seemed to have much a customer base, but he did manage at least one thing very shrewdly. During the 1960s, at the height of the model airplane glue-sniffing era, New York City, along with other municipalities around America, passed a law that a kid had to buy a model kit, if he wanted to buy a tube of that good ole high-inducing model glue. My father had only one old, beat-up model kit in the store, but plenty of glue. A glue-sniffing kid would come in and buy the kit in order to get the more coveted glue, then go around the corner and dump the kit in my dad's store's garbage can, before slipping off to get high. My father noticed the kit laying atop the garbage, dusted it off and put it back on the store shelf for his next hobby sale. He must have sold that same model kit at least twenty times. It was his biggest money maker."

I remember those days when it got harder to buy model airplane glue, because of the abuse by the glue-sniffing underworld of every major city. Luckily, the mom and pop stores in my old neighborhood in the Ironbound section of Newark, NJ, did not pay much attention to the law in this regard and I was always able to get a tube when I needed it.

Anybody else remember those days?

P.S. If have not heard the Tsunami joke, it went something like, I just broke up with my Japanese girlfriend the other day, but Im not very sad. Another one will come floating along soon.

Apparently, AFLAC, which has a sizable customer base in Japan, was not amused for some reason. Because the practice is fraught with danger, I neither tweet, nor twat.
for me in the late 1960's early 1970's. In the mid-1980's I was a Criminal Investigator in the county where I grew up, there was a major problem with huffing paint in a couple area's of that county, I'd see these kids going off to jail, with thier faces the color of the paint they had been huffing...gold and silver were very popular...it wasn't so much model paint but hardware store/big box do it yourself store spray paint. Mike.
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Joined: May 18th, 2007, 1:28 am

May 16th, 2012, 12:41 pm #9

ca 1987. This guy walked in, and there was no question he was stoned to the gills. He staggered out into the lanes. On a saturday night. Every lane was in use. He got hit by a bowling ball...hard, bit it didn't even phase him. The police were called, and responded in short order. They were able to take him away. He got hit and killed by a car out on route 440 two days later....stoned out of his skull.

"The FANS are fighting back!!!"
"The SECURITY GUARDS are fighting back!!!"
"The PEANUT VENDORS are fighting back!!!"
Growing up in the Ironbound section of Newark in the 1960's and early 70's, I went to high school in Jersey City - St.Peter's Prep, hit golf balls at the Rt440 Chip n Putt and shopped and went to the movies up the road from the course at the mall.

When I was about 11 or 12, I walked from Down Neck Newark to Jersey City under the Pulaski Skyway, on a catwalk that consisted of a beam and a steel rod handrail (only on one side), over the Passiac and Hackensack Rivers with a buddy of mine.
Last edited by PolishMikeD on May 16th, 2012, 12:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 4th, 2006, 7:00 pm

May 16th, 2012, 2:30 pm #10

The former voice of the Aflac Duck was on Howards show awhile ago talking about the circumstances of his being fired due to his unfortunate choice jokes he tweeted about the Tsunami disaster in Japan. Somehow the conversation drifted around to the relationship each had with their dads, and Godfried related the following story, which I will paraphrase to the best of my ability.

"My father owned a hardware store in Coney Island, New York City. He was not much of a business man and the store's location was on an out-of-the-way side street, not anywhere near the Cyclone (the famous wooden roller coaster in the Coney Island amusement park on the boardwalk). He never seemed to have much a customer base, but he did manage at least one thing very shrewdly. During the 1960s, at the height of the model airplane glue-sniffing era, New York City, along with other municipalities around America, passed a law that a kid had to buy a model kit, if he wanted to buy a tube of that good ole high-inducing model glue. My father had only one old, beat-up model kit in the store, but plenty of glue. A glue-sniffing kid would come in and buy the kit in order to get the more coveted glue, then go around the corner and dump the kit in my dad's store's garbage can, before slipping off to get high. My father noticed the kit laying atop the garbage, dusted it off and put it back on the store shelf for his next hobby sale. He must have sold that same model kit at least twenty times. It was his biggest money maker."

I remember those days when it got harder to buy model airplane glue, because of the abuse by the glue-sniffing underworld of every major city. Luckily, the mom and pop stores in my old neighborhood in the Ironbound section of Newark, NJ, did not pay much attention to the law in this regard and I was always able to get a tube when I needed it.

Anybody else remember those days?

P.S. If have not heard the Tsunami joke, it went something like, I just broke up with my Japanese girlfriend the other day, but Im not very sad. Another one will come floating along soon.

Apparently, AFLAC, which has a sizable customer base in Japan, was not amused for some reason. Because the practice is fraught with danger, I neither tweet, nor twat.
..., of all things, PAM (the pressurized cooking oil/coating stuff). He would sniff glue and paint when I knew him. His family moved, and I heard a couple of years later that he died from sniffing the PAM: The stuff coated his lungs and he suffocated. I can't imagine how awful that was - to be breathing but still suffocating.

I guess it's just in some people's genes to abuse substances. I've done my share of recreational activities, but I've never had the addictive reactions. Maybe I'm just lucky. But I've never inhaled anything to get high: Even as a kid and a teenager, the thought never entered by mind to do it, even when I knew other kids were.

Regards,

Lee G.
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