Weight on nose leg of a/c models

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Weight on nose leg of a/c models

Joined: April 9th, 2005, 4:28 pm

March 30th, 2012, 4:09 pm #1

I keep reading about potential problems with weak nosewheel legs on tricycle u/c aircraft models, most recently the Roden T-28 review on MM. Seems to me people are ignoring (or ignorant of) the basic physics here - adding weight to keep models from tipping back should just balance the weight of the area behind the main u/c. The weight on the main u/c legs will of course increase with the total weight of the model - but there should be a minimum of weight on the nose gear!! If you put in so much lead that the nose gear leg is stressed, you've way overdone it....
So strengthen the main gear if you have to, but don't fret about the leg at the front.
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Joined: February 24th, 2002, 12:50 pm

March 30th, 2012, 5:46 pm #2

Anytime I hear someone worry about the weight/stress on a nose gear, I know I've met someone who managed to sleep through EVERY elementary/junior high/high school science and physics class.

Think of it this way: Take the nose gear off, and then add JUST enough weight so that the model balances sitting level on the mains. How much weight is on the nose gear now? Answer: NONE.

Now slide the nose gear in there. How much weight is on it now? Virtually none.

It ain't rocket surgery, just basic physics, folks.





Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
Last edited by Snake45 on March 30th, 2012, 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 25th, 2005, 9:31 pm

March 30th, 2012, 6:10 pm #3

I keep reading about potential problems with weak nosewheel legs on tricycle u/c aircraft models, most recently the Roden T-28 review on MM. Seems to me people are ignoring (or ignorant of) the basic physics here - adding weight to keep models from tipping back should just balance the weight of the area behind the main u/c. The weight on the main u/c legs will of course increase with the total weight of the model - but there should be a minimum of weight on the nose gear!! If you put in so much lead that the nose gear leg is stressed, you've way overdone it....
So strengthen the main gear if you have to, but don't fret about the leg at the front.
There are some people who will never figure it out.

For them, an ounce of weight in the nose is an ounce of weight on the nose gear...just a sure as pound of feathers weighs less than a pound of lead .
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Joined: March 4th, 2005, 2:03 pm

March 30th, 2012, 6:13 pm #4

Anytime I hear someone worry about the weight/stress on a nose gear, I know I've met someone who managed to sleep through EVERY elementary/junior high/high school science and physics class.

Think of it this way: Take the nose gear off, and then add JUST enough weight so that the model balances sitting level on the mains. How much weight is on the nose gear now? Answer: NONE.

Now slide the nose gear in there. How much weight is on it now? Virtually none.

It ain't rocket surgery, just basic physics, folks.





Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
When you are flying around the room and you don't flare on landing. Now how much weight is on the nose gear? ALL OF IT!!!
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Joined: March 2nd, 2005, 3:52 pm

March 30th, 2012, 6:21 pm #5

Anytime I hear someone worry about the weight/stress on a nose gear, I know I've met someone who managed to sleep through EVERY elementary/junior high/high school science and physics class.

Think of it this way: Take the nose gear off, and then add JUST enough weight so that the model balances sitting level on the mains. How much weight is on the nose gear now? Answer: NONE.

Now slide the nose gear in there. How much weight is on it now? Virtually none.

It ain't rocket surgery, just basic physics, folks.





Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
What you've described is waaaaaay above lots of heads
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

March 30th, 2012, 6:33 pm #6

I keep reading about potential problems with weak nosewheel legs on tricycle u/c aircraft models, most recently the Roden T-28 review on MM. Seems to me people are ignoring (or ignorant of) the basic physics here - adding weight to keep models from tipping back should just balance the weight of the area behind the main u/c. The weight on the main u/c legs will of course increase with the total weight of the model - but there should be a minimum of weight on the nose gear!! If you put in so much lead that the nose gear leg is stressed, you've way overdone it....
So strengthen the main gear if you have to, but don't fret about the leg at the front.
The only time I have broken any kind of landing gear has been through some sort of accident. I can't think of any one that just broke sitting there. I think this is a huge non issue and if you drop a phone book on the model or something like that, its going to break anyway.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:37 am

March 30th, 2012, 6:47 pm #7

I keep reading about potential problems with weak nosewheel legs on tricycle u/c aircraft models, most recently the Roden T-28 review on MM. Seems to me people are ignoring (or ignorant of) the basic physics here - adding weight to keep models from tipping back should just balance the weight of the area behind the main u/c. The weight on the main u/c legs will of course increase with the total weight of the model - but there should be a minimum of weight on the nose gear!! If you put in so much lead that the nose gear leg is stressed, you've way overdone it....
So strengthen the main gear if you have to, but don't fret about the leg at the front.
I've got 5 48th F7F's that have been sitting on the shelf for years and no nose gear problems. It would not be a problem for me to come up with a weight for the new T-28, just need to get my hands on one.


Cheers, Terry
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Joined: August 16th, 2006, 2:23 am

March 30th, 2012, 7:13 pm #8

When you are flying around the room and you don't flare on landing. Now how much weight is on the nose gear? ALL OF IT!!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSjV7DQqoBA
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 3:08 pm

March 30th, 2012, 7:40 pm #9

I keep reading about potential problems with weak nosewheel legs on tricycle u/c aircraft models, most recently the Roden T-28 review on MM. Seems to me people are ignoring (or ignorant of) the basic physics here - adding weight to keep models from tipping back should just balance the weight of the area behind the main u/c. The weight on the main u/c legs will of course increase with the total weight of the model - but there should be a minimum of weight on the nose gear!! If you put in so much lead that the nose gear leg is stressed, you've way overdone it....
So strengthen the main gear if you have to, but don't fret about the leg at the front.
The nose gear can take quite a bit of compression load (holding weight).

What is can't take so much of is side (or lateral) loading.

That's why most landing gear snap off.

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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:37 am

March 30th, 2012, 8:40 pm #10

Amen to that. nt.
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