Weathering on NMF kits

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Weathering on NMF kits

Joined: February 28th, 2005, 10:42 am

July 1st, 2012, 9:08 pm #1

This is just an observation we made looking at many kits that are painted in natural metal.A lot of the kits have preshading but for example as far as we know the wings of the Mustang were puttied to make the aircraft more aerodynamic so at least in theory there should not be any spaces for the dirt to accumulate.Two weeks ago my Dad talked lenghthy with the vice president of ipms Deutschland at a model show and he shared my father's opinion that the spaces between the panels on real aircraft are so narrow that it is highly improbable that so much dirt accumulates as modellers show it on their kits.

Greetings

Christian
Last edited by GiampieroSilvestri on July 1st, 2012, 9:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 13th, 2008, 10:54 am

July 1st, 2012, 9:22 pm #2

Indeed, indeed, indeed. Some people need to get in the field and look at real planes sometimes. But, just as art goes through phases and styles, so does modelling. We are just in the preshading and over highlighting phase.
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Joined: March 19th, 2007, 9:06 am

July 1st, 2012, 9:44 pm #3

This is just an observation we made looking at many kits that are painted in natural metal.A lot of the kits have preshading but for example as far as we know the wings of the Mustang were puttied to make the aircraft more aerodynamic so at least in theory there should not be any spaces for the dirt to accumulate.Two weeks ago my Dad talked lenghthy with the vice president of ipms Deutschland at a model show and he shared my father's opinion that the spaces between the panels on real aircraft are so narrow that it is highly improbable that so much dirt accumulates as modellers show it on their kits.

Greetings

Christian
Good for you I guess. I don't know why people have to keep dragging this stuff up. You've missed the point, preshading isn't used to represent dirt per se, it's an artistic effect to show variation to the colour, if you don't like it then don't use it. I doubt even the most ardent preshader thinks there was a foot wide swath of dirt along each panel.
Last edited by Gluehuffer on July 1st, 2012, 9:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 14th, 2005, 7:39 pm

July 1st, 2012, 9:45 pm #4

This is just an observation we made looking at many kits that are painted in natural metal.A lot of the kits have preshading but for example as far as we know the wings of the Mustang were puttied to make the aircraft more aerodynamic so at least in theory there should not be any spaces for the dirt to accumulate.Two weeks ago my Dad talked lenghthy with the vice president of ipms Deutschland at a model show and he shared my father's opinion that the spaces between the panels on real aircraft are so narrow that it is highly improbable that so much dirt accumulates as modellers show it on their kits.

Greetings

Christian
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Yes, Sometimes people do go overboard!
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"Never run out of airspeed,altitude and ideas all at the same time" Pilots Creed
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 6:29 am

July 1st, 2012, 11:53 pm #5

This is just an observation we made looking at many kits that are painted in natural metal.A lot of the kits have preshading but for example as far as we know the wings of the Mustang were puttied to make the aircraft more aerodynamic so at least in theory there should not be any spaces for the dirt to accumulate.Two weeks ago my Dad talked lenghthy with the vice president of ipms Deutschland at a model show and he shared my father's opinion that the spaces between the panels on real aircraft are so narrow that it is highly improbable that so much dirt accumulates as modellers show it on their kits.

Greetings

Christian
The "the real thing would never accumulate dirt in the lines" need to check some reference photos and look at real aircraft.

Here's a bright and shiny F-104... wait is that dirt accumulating against those panels and in the fastners.



Those who do preshade tend to apply preshading and panel line washes in a uniform way which isn't always realistic, but it's a choice. I'm in this camp, if you don't like my work, I'll get over it...

Over the years, I've saved numerous photos and observed real aircraft with weathered finishes. Everytime this thread gets posted (and it gets posted alot) I think about posting the many shots of extensively weathered aircraft but know you can counter with shots of aircraft that aren't weathered.. the trick is to make sure your approach is appropriate to the model you are building

David's Model Pages on Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/modelscale
Last edited by nzdavidh on July 1st, 2012, 11:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 27th, 2006, 9:56 pm

July 2nd, 2012, 12:01 am #6

This is just an observation we made looking at many kits that are painted in natural metal.A lot of the kits have preshading but for example as far as we know the wings of the Mustang were puttied to make the aircraft more aerodynamic so at least in theory there should not be any spaces for the dirt to accumulate.Two weeks ago my Dad talked lenghthy with the vice president of ipms Deutschland at a model show and he shared my father's opinion that the spaces between the panels on real aircraft are so narrow that it is highly improbable that so much dirt accumulates as modellers show it on their kits.

Greetings

Christian
Or is that too simple?
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Joined: February 15th, 2009, 5:46 am

July 2nd, 2012, 12:50 am #7

The "the real thing would never accumulate dirt in the lines" need to check some reference photos and look at real aircraft.

Here's a bright and shiny F-104... wait is that dirt accumulating against those panels and in the fastners.



Those who do preshade tend to apply preshading and panel line washes in a uniform way which isn't always realistic, but it's a choice. I'm in this camp, if you don't like my work, I'll get over it...

Over the years, I've saved numerous photos and observed real aircraft with weathered finishes. Everytime this thread gets posted (and it gets posted alot) I think about posting the many shots of extensively weathered aircraft but know you can counter with shots of aircraft that aren't weathered.. the trick is to make sure your approach is appropriate to the model you are building

David's Model Pages on Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/modelscale
...is to look at photos and replicate what I see in the photos. That's it. I don't care whether it's dirt, oil, schmutz, shadow, etc... whatever. If I see it in the photos, I try to replicate it on the model. Having access to high-res photos on sites like Fold3 and the LOC has changed my opinion on how A/C looked in service. If all one has ever seen are washed-out, over-exposed, poorly-reproduced photos in mass-produced referene books over the years, they may have different ideas on how the A/C looked in service.

This has always been one of my favorite photos to break out whenever the "too dirty" debates start. It's a factory fresh P-51A on a shakedown/acceptance fight. That's as fresh and as clean as this plane ever looked in it's life and it's downright scruffy. But it's fresh out of the factory, you can still see the little white inspector stickers all over the fuselage.



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Joined: January 25th, 2010, 4:16 pm

July 2nd, 2012, 12:55 am #8

Good for you I guess. I don't know why people have to keep dragging this stuff up. You've missed the point, preshading isn't used to represent dirt per se, it's an artistic effect to show variation to the colour, if you don't like it then don't use it. I doubt even the most ardent preshader thinks there was a foot wide swath of dirt along each panel.
And black electrician's tape over ever skin joint.
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Joined: October 20th, 2005, 11:40 pm

July 2nd, 2012, 1:45 am #9

This is just an observation we made looking at many kits that are painted in natural metal.A lot of the kits have preshading but for example as far as we know the wings of the Mustang were puttied to make the aircraft more aerodynamic so at least in theory there should not be any spaces for the dirt to accumulate.Two weeks ago my Dad talked lenghthy with the vice president of ipms Deutschland at a model show and he shared my father's opinion that the spaces between the panels on real aircraft are so narrow that it is highly improbable that so much dirt accumulates as modellers show it on their kits.

Greetings

Christian
I accumulated some 9500 hours flying painted and unpainted military aircraft and one thing that was true to both was that before an aircraft got dirty, it was clean and dirty aircraft, during peacetime, invariably got washed as part of routine maintenance and were made clean again. In essence, build your model as you see the original - clean or dirty.
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Joined: August 12th, 2007, 3:33 am

July 2nd, 2012, 12:01 pm #10

Or is that too simple?
Common sense has no place on this forum
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