using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler/putty replacement...

.

using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler/putty replacement...

Joined: November 28th, 2009, 7:59 pm

November 14th, 2017, 5:29 pm #1

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj

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Joined: March 19th, 2007, 9:06 am

November 14th, 2017, 5:37 pm #2

You have to sand it while it's fresh. I rarely use it on anything larger than a seam line since it flows well into small crevices and is easy to work in small amounts.
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Joined: July 3rd, 2013, 2:17 am

You have to start sanding right after it sets.

November 14th, 2017, 5:44 pm #3

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj
CA glues set then fully cure over time to reach the full hardness, 24 hours later it's a lot harder to sand than it would be 1 hour after it sets.

Talc can be added to make a putty/paste to fill larger gaps, it also has the benefit of being easier to sand than straight CA. Something I've done is to mix up a putty out of CA and talc and use it to remold the trailing edge of a wing for example, I'll let it set and then sand it to shape. Then I'll apply a thin coat of the extra thin CA over the area for strength. It fills in any small voids and helps to strengthen the area.

Since CA cures chemically and not by drying like any of the solvent putties you dn't have to worry about thick applications taking forever to dry or the underlying plastic staying soft because of the solvents. CA is much stronger than the solvent putties so it works well for making sharp edges, and it scribes with a much cleaner line than solvent putties.

Ken
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Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:33 am

You got the typical results

November 14th, 2017, 5:52 pm #4

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj
Regardless of the brand, CA glue cures to a hardness typically greater than the surrounding material, so care must be exercised when sanding it. Many modelers who post build blogs and mention using CA as a filler will note this. You could try using tape to protect the areas surrounding the seam during sanding.

As for benefits, or rather, advantages over some other method, personally I can't think of one. I think it has more to do with personal preference and with a dislike of putties like Squadron white. Some note that Squadron putty shrinks as it cures and don't like the product for that reason.

I use Squadron white to fill seams and have no problems doing so. I thin it with acetone. Either I dissolve a blob of putty in a little glass jar, with a couple drops of acetone, and then apply it to the seam with an old brush. Or I apply the putty to the seam and then use a cotton swab soaked in acetone to remove the excess. Either way, I get the putty into the seam and remove excess, reducing the amount of sanding after the putty cures.

But it's preference. To me, it's less fuss using Squadron white, than to use CA glue. To someone else, the preferences are reversed. And others use other methods than these.
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 2:03 am

I use it for sink marks and small blemishes. I hit it with accelerator.....

November 14th, 2017, 7:30 pm #5

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj
and sand it immediately, within moments. I wouldn’t let it sit much past 15 minutes.
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Joined: March 10th, 2005, 11:29 pm

For me the main benefit

November 14th, 2017, 7:49 pm #6

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj
is that it cures hard enough that it'll match the surrounding styrene under a NMF paint job. As others have said, it's important to sand/smooth it before it fully cures. I generally hit it with accelerator and start sanding immediately.
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Joined: February 25th, 2012, 1:39 am

If it gets too hard, protect the surrounding plastic with Kabuki tape,

November 14th, 2017, 7:56 pm #7

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj
and file it down. The rigidness of the metal file with grind through the raised glue and the Kabuki tape will keep the surrounding detail from scuffing. Weirdly, the waxy surface of the tape keeps the file from biting.

When it’s level, remove the tape and sand smooth. I prefer using CA as a filler because it won’t shrink and it won’t react to any paint solvents. With other fillers, often the lacquer in the paint will re-soften the putty and cause the seams or ejector pin marks to reappear.
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Joined: November 28th, 2009, 7:59 pm

thanks for all the tips

November 14th, 2017, 8:15 pm #8

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj
I'm finding the Maxi-Cure and Insta-Cure+ are getting very hard very fast within a few minutes of hitting the spot with the accelerator. I suppose I need to work more quickly as I've been 'coming back later' to start the sanding. I'll do an experiment with a spare cheap kit and try talc, sanding immediately and with the tape to protect nearby area.

cheers to all!
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Joined: October 5th, 2015, 9:16 am

Don't forget you safety-

November 14th, 2017, 8:17 pm #9

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj
- I am extremely sensitive to sanded CA and general CA fumes, it can bring on a huge Asthma attack, far worse than any other triggers.

I don't know why. But just make sure you are aware
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:34 pm

Quantity matters as well

November 14th, 2017, 8:21 pm #10

I've tried using cyanoacrylate glue as a filler a few times - the result has been deposits of cured glue on the spot to be filled that are so hard as to be unsandable. Working on the CA glue spot with a sanding stick has resulted in damage to the plastic but not the glue - it seems to have hardened into something the stick can't smooth off. The glues used were Bob Smith Industries Maxi-Cure (extra-thick 10-25s) and Insta-Cure+ (gap-filling 5-15s). Any suggestions on how to use CA glue for filling? Am I using the wrong types of glue? I just noted the addition of talc on the 109 details just posted. What exactly are the benefits of CA glue over e.g., Squadron putty as a filler?

ilj
I generally don't use putty for any type of filler work. I like Bob Smith Medium Insta-Cure because it seems easier to sand down than the extra thick stuff. My process for filling a seam involves using a bottle cap to hold a dollop of CA and applying the glue to the area in question using a short length of metal wire. This way seems much neater and more precise than just applying straight from the container. After hitting the CA with some kicker (Insta-Set) I use a #15 scalpel blade to scrape away the upper surface of the CA before attacking the remains with some 320 or 400 grit wet sandpaper. For areas that have surrounding detail or are confined and difficult to sand (pin marks in wheel wells come to mind) I make a mini sanding pad using a hemostat. Cut a very narrow short strip of sandpaper and fold it over a couple of times. Grip the folded end of the sandpaper slightly above the fold with the hemostat. Press down on the fold and you have yourself a mini sanding pad that would otherwise be too small to hold and use with only your fingers. As my British friend Tony would say, "Works a treat".
Last edited by davesherrill on November 14th, 2017, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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