the 'poured paint' method to paint the interior.

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the 'poured paint' method to paint the interior.

Joined: November 23rd, 2004, 12:24 pm

May 22nd, 2012, 7:28 pm #1

Jeffs beautiful rendition of Hasegawas A-7 mentions the 'poured paint' method to paint the interior of the intake trunking. Am I the only one that doesnt know what that is??

Its a fool that looks at the sun and points at the moon.
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Joined: January 11th, 2006, 12:15 am

May 22nd, 2012, 7:55 pm #2

I've only done it a couple of times, but the method I use is to block off one end of the intake w/ tape, then I pour paint (I used gloss white latex out paint) into the intake, let it sit for a couple of minutes, and then I pull the tape off, letting the paint drain out, usually into a dixie cup or something similar. The only issue I had w/ this was thicker paint build up where I'd drain the paint. I got around this by attaching a piece of tubing to the end of the intake, if it was round, and that helped to even out the amount of paint at the end of the intake.
Last edited by AdamGBaker on May 22nd, 2012, 7:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 26th, 2004, 9:36 pm

May 22nd, 2012, 8:34 pm #3

I experienced the same problem when I tried this method. Next time I will be sure to extend the length of the intake as you suggest.

This is why I love Hyperscale! I learn some new trick or fact all the time.




It is better to be the stomper rather than the stompee!
It is better to be the Stomper rather than the Stompee!
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:16 am

May 22nd, 2012, 9:01 pm #4

I've only done it a couple of times, but the method I use is to block off one end of the intake w/ tape, then I pour paint (I used gloss white latex out paint) into the intake, let it sit for a couple of minutes, and then I pull the tape off, letting the paint drain out, usually into a dixie cup or something similar. The only issue I had w/ this was thicker paint build up where I'd drain the paint. I got around this by attaching a piece of tubing to the end of the intake, if it was round, and that helped to even out the amount of paint at the end of the intake.
It naturally runs, and I rotate the trunk appropriately to flood the seam area. Since it's lacquer, the drying time is fairly short, and soon she's'a ready for another very wet coat. If the seam's not too gross, I find that it takes about three applications to adequately cover the sucker. Just used this method on ze beeg Sufa.

Phil
Last edited by bondo455 on May 22nd, 2012, 9:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 28th, 2005, 2:48 pm

May 23rd, 2012, 2:55 am #5

nt
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Joined: March 7th, 2005, 1:29 pm

May 23rd, 2012, 12:36 pm #6

Jeffs beautiful rendition of Hasegawas A-7 mentions the 'poured paint' method to paint the interior of the intake trunking. Am I the only one that doesnt know what that is??

Its a fool that looks at the sun and points at the moon.
I did go to a wide 1/4 to 1/2" wide good quality camel hair brush and white appliance enamel.

If you moisten the brush first with thinner before loading it with paint it will cover one coat with no brush strokes. Just don't let the brush get too dry.

I think this method is much easier and cleaner. The paint is much easier to control also.

Just my $0.02.

joe.
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