The Big Spit - Still Plugging Away

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The Big Spit - Still Plugging Away

Joined: November 13th, 2008, 10:18 pm

March 24th, 2011, 2:28 am #1

I was hoping this would be the last - finished - post on the Big Spit project but events have dictated otherwise (deep sigh). Okay, we left off here, with test fitting the wings to fuselage:

I used a piece of sharpened brass rod to better define the fastners around the engine cowling. Place, push and twist...place, push and twist:

At the rear of the underwing radiator, some reinforcing rod and actuator details were added using scraps of stretched sprue:

These early Spits had fabric ailerons which I replicated using 1mm (approx) strips of Tamiya masking tape, sealed in with a layer of Tamiya Extra Thin Liquid Plastic Cement. This was a tip I saw Mike Grant use in a recent build article on an Airfix Sopwith Pup. It worked great:

Blocks of clear plastic sprue were glued into the wingtip light housings, sanded smooth and coated with Future before masking:

Wings and fuselage were finally mated with a strip of masking tape applied to gain the proper dihedral on the wings:

The overall wing to fuselage fit was pretty darn good. I just needed a little filler around the lower wing joint, near the nose:

I made sure to mark and then mask off the spot where the kit stand will meet the aircraft. I want a good, solid plastic-on-plastic weld here:

The gunsight features a new mount and a piece of plastic rod underneath to make it look more like the real thing:

I noticed some small plastic dimples on the rear canopy portion and decided to sand them smooth. After sanding with progressively finer grits of sandpaper, I then swabbed on a coat of Future expecting the canopy to magically 'clear up.' Uh...it didn't happen:

Blast! I should have left it alone. Plan B: sand away 1mm of kit canopy, fill it with two-part epoxy putty, and jam a stick into it in an effort to stretch-form a replacement:


I took a piece of clear plastic from the lid of a shirt box and installed it in my handy-dandy stretch-forming jig: two pieces of wood panelling held together with small nuts and bolts. Stove on high, oven mitt in hand, we rotate same in quick fashion until plastic sags:

When the plastic tightens up again, we remove from stove and plunge said stick-canopy combination into soft plastic. Seconds later the whole works will harden solid and then it's just a matter of cutting and trim-sanding the new canopy piece:



Finally! Some paint:

And then more paint. This is where we're at now. Some Tamiya Sky acrylic on the undersides:

More soon, hopefully...
As I'm sure many of you are aware, Allied airmen are in the air this night over Libya. I know a lot of Air Force folks here in Canada, and with your permission, I'd like to offer the following prayer for them and all the other Allied fliers and support personnel doing what they have to do. (These are not my words, but the slightly abridged words of a Canadian writer):
"Dear Lord our Creator, you are present everywhere anyone can be.
When you speak, the crooked is made straight and the waves of the sea fall still.
You make the clouds your chariot and you walk on the wings of the winds.
Oh Creator, protect I pray our dear ones who are far away and fight.
And bring each of them, wherever they may be, safe to their journey's rest." Amen!
Best...Ted...

WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
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Joined: September 18th, 2007, 5:50 pm

March 24th, 2011, 3:50 am #2

thank you for the tutorial on plunge molding. I have never tried it but I need a sliding canopy for a Hampden and that looks like the ticket. Your fastners on the engine cowling with the home-made fastener maker are awsome- love it. I look forward to seeing more-- Awsome job. (I like the spirit of the prayer and thoughts that go with it.)
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 10:18 pm

March 24th, 2011, 4:13 am #3

I still have the Hampden canopy mold-stick I used on my Bilek/Airfix Hampden Randy:

It looked pretty good on the kit:



I could produce a couple or three for you and pop 'em in the mail, if you want to email me off board with your mailing address. Always willing to help a fellow modeller and Hampden builder! Great looking airplane, although from what I've read I don't think I would've wanted to be in one in combat!
Best...Ted...


WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9; The Big Spit Pt.10;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
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Joined: March 9th, 2008, 11:37 am

March 24th, 2011, 9:54 am #4

I was hoping this would be the last - finished - post on the Big Spit project but events have dictated otherwise (deep sigh). Okay, we left off here, with test fitting the wings to fuselage:

I used a piece of sharpened brass rod to better define the fastners around the engine cowling. Place, push and twist...place, push and twist:

At the rear of the underwing radiator, some reinforcing rod and actuator details were added using scraps of stretched sprue:

These early Spits had fabric ailerons which I replicated using 1mm (approx) strips of Tamiya masking tape, sealed in with a layer of Tamiya Extra Thin Liquid Plastic Cement. This was a tip I saw Mike Grant use in a recent build article on an Airfix Sopwith Pup. It worked great:

Blocks of clear plastic sprue were glued into the wingtip light housings, sanded smooth and coated with Future before masking:

Wings and fuselage were finally mated with a strip of masking tape applied to gain the proper dihedral on the wings:

The overall wing to fuselage fit was pretty darn good. I just needed a little filler around the lower wing joint, near the nose:

I made sure to mark and then mask off the spot where the kit stand will meet the aircraft. I want a good, solid plastic-on-plastic weld here:

The gunsight features a new mount and a piece of plastic rod underneath to make it look more like the real thing:

I noticed some small plastic dimples on the rear canopy portion and decided to sand them smooth. After sanding with progressively finer grits of sandpaper, I then swabbed on a coat of Future expecting the canopy to magically 'clear up.' Uh...it didn't happen:

Blast! I should have left it alone. Plan B: sand away 1mm of kit canopy, fill it with two-part epoxy putty, and jam a stick into it in an effort to stretch-form a replacement:


I took a piece of clear plastic from the lid of a shirt box and installed it in my handy-dandy stretch-forming jig: two pieces of wood panelling held together with small nuts and bolts. Stove on high, oven mitt in hand, we rotate same in quick fashion until plastic sags:

When the plastic tightens up again, we remove from stove and plunge said stick-canopy combination into soft plastic. Seconds later the whole works will harden solid and then it's just a matter of cutting and trim-sanding the new canopy piece:



Finally! Some paint:

And then more paint. This is where we're at now. Some Tamiya Sky acrylic on the undersides:

More soon, hopefully...
As I'm sure many of you are aware, Allied airmen are in the air this night over Libya. I know a lot of Air Force folks here in Canada, and with your permission, I'd like to offer the following prayer for them and all the other Allied fliers and support personnel doing what they have to do. (These are not my words, but the slightly abridged words of a Canadian writer):
"Dear Lord our Creator, you are present everywhere anyone can be.
When you speak, the crooked is made straight and the waves of the sea fall still.
You make the clouds your chariot and you walk on the wings of the winds.
Oh Creator, protect I pray our dear ones who are far away and fight.
And bring each of them, wherever they may be, safe to their journey's rest." Amen!
Best...Ted...

WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
Listen what happened: a friend of mine, who is an amateur movie director and producer, is planning to make a film on the story of a family of my town during the war period. Although it is not a war movie, he is planning to include a scene depicting a fact actually happened in 1944: a Spitfire of SAAF strafed a civilian train, killing many passengers. And...he asked ME to build a Spitfire model to be used as "special effect" in his movie! Of course I'm going to do it "in flight" and with motorized propeller to make it the best possible "actor" for this movie. Plan B is to make it with non-motorized but freely spinning prop, to be blown with an hairdryer. Let's see...
Massimo LaCivita
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Joined: August 25th, 2007, 10:45 am

March 24th, 2011, 10:31 am #5

I was hoping this would be the last - finished - post on the Big Spit project but events have dictated otherwise (deep sigh). Okay, we left off here, with test fitting the wings to fuselage:

I used a piece of sharpened brass rod to better define the fastners around the engine cowling. Place, push and twist...place, push and twist:

At the rear of the underwing radiator, some reinforcing rod and actuator details were added using scraps of stretched sprue:

These early Spits had fabric ailerons which I replicated using 1mm (approx) strips of Tamiya masking tape, sealed in with a layer of Tamiya Extra Thin Liquid Plastic Cement. This was a tip I saw Mike Grant use in a recent build article on an Airfix Sopwith Pup. It worked great:

Blocks of clear plastic sprue were glued into the wingtip light housings, sanded smooth and coated with Future before masking:

Wings and fuselage were finally mated with a strip of masking tape applied to gain the proper dihedral on the wings:

The overall wing to fuselage fit was pretty darn good. I just needed a little filler around the lower wing joint, near the nose:

I made sure to mark and then mask off the spot where the kit stand will meet the aircraft. I want a good, solid plastic-on-plastic weld here:

The gunsight features a new mount and a piece of plastic rod underneath to make it look more like the real thing:

I noticed some small plastic dimples on the rear canopy portion and decided to sand them smooth. After sanding with progressively finer grits of sandpaper, I then swabbed on a coat of Future expecting the canopy to magically 'clear up.' Uh...it didn't happen:

Blast! I should have left it alone. Plan B: sand away 1mm of kit canopy, fill it with two-part epoxy putty, and jam a stick into it in an effort to stretch-form a replacement:


I took a piece of clear plastic from the lid of a shirt box and installed it in my handy-dandy stretch-forming jig: two pieces of wood panelling held together with small nuts and bolts. Stove on high, oven mitt in hand, we rotate same in quick fashion until plastic sags:

When the plastic tightens up again, we remove from stove and plunge said stick-canopy combination into soft plastic. Seconds later the whole works will harden solid and then it's just a matter of cutting and trim-sanding the new canopy piece:



Finally! Some paint:

And then more paint. This is where we're at now. Some Tamiya Sky acrylic on the undersides:

More soon, hopefully...
As I'm sure many of you are aware, Allied airmen are in the air this night over Libya. I know a lot of Air Force folks here in Canada, and with your permission, I'd like to offer the following prayer for them and all the other Allied fliers and support personnel doing what they have to do. (These are not my words, but the slightly abridged words of a Canadian writer):
"Dear Lord our Creator, you are present everywhere anyone can be.
When you speak, the crooked is made straight and the waves of the sea fall still.
You make the clouds your chariot and you walk on the wings of the winds.
Oh Creator, protect I pray our dear ones who are far away and fight.
And bring each of them, wherever they may be, safe to their journey's rest." Amen!
Best...Ted...

WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
..to 1972 when I built My first superkit...It's the wires I think....and great save on the canopy,I've never done any moulding,but You show there's no fear involved!

I share the sentiments in Your Prayer..


Keep Sticking!

Cheers, Pete
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 3:06 pm

March 24th, 2011, 12:43 pm #6

I was hoping this would be the last - finished - post on the Big Spit project but events have dictated otherwise (deep sigh). Okay, we left off here, with test fitting the wings to fuselage:

I used a piece of sharpened brass rod to better define the fastners around the engine cowling. Place, push and twist...place, push and twist:

At the rear of the underwing radiator, some reinforcing rod and actuator details were added using scraps of stretched sprue:

These early Spits had fabric ailerons which I replicated using 1mm (approx) strips of Tamiya masking tape, sealed in with a layer of Tamiya Extra Thin Liquid Plastic Cement. This was a tip I saw Mike Grant use in a recent build article on an Airfix Sopwith Pup. It worked great:

Blocks of clear plastic sprue were glued into the wingtip light housings, sanded smooth and coated with Future before masking:

Wings and fuselage were finally mated with a strip of masking tape applied to gain the proper dihedral on the wings:

The overall wing to fuselage fit was pretty darn good. I just needed a little filler around the lower wing joint, near the nose:

I made sure to mark and then mask off the spot where the kit stand will meet the aircraft. I want a good, solid plastic-on-plastic weld here:

The gunsight features a new mount and a piece of plastic rod underneath to make it look more like the real thing:

I noticed some small plastic dimples on the rear canopy portion and decided to sand them smooth. After sanding with progressively finer grits of sandpaper, I then swabbed on a coat of Future expecting the canopy to magically 'clear up.' Uh...it didn't happen:

Blast! I should have left it alone. Plan B: sand away 1mm of kit canopy, fill it with two-part epoxy putty, and jam a stick into it in an effort to stretch-form a replacement:


I took a piece of clear plastic from the lid of a shirt box and installed it in my handy-dandy stretch-forming jig: two pieces of wood panelling held together with small nuts and bolts. Stove on high, oven mitt in hand, we rotate same in quick fashion until plastic sags:

When the plastic tightens up again, we remove from stove and plunge said stick-canopy combination into soft plastic. Seconds later the whole works will harden solid and then it's just a matter of cutting and trim-sanding the new canopy piece:



Finally! Some paint:

And then more paint. This is where we're at now. Some Tamiya Sky acrylic on the undersides:

More soon, hopefully...
As I'm sure many of you are aware, Allied airmen are in the air this night over Libya. I know a lot of Air Force folks here in Canada, and with your permission, I'd like to offer the following prayer for them and all the other Allied fliers and support personnel doing what they have to do. (These are not my words, but the slightly abridged words of a Canadian writer):
"Dear Lord our Creator, you are present everywhere anyone can be.
When you speak, the crooked is made straight and the waves of the sea fall still.
You make the clouds your chariot and you walk on the wings of the winds.
Oh Creator, protect I pray our dear ones who are far away and fight.
And bring each of them, wherever they may be, safe to their journey's rest." Amen!
Best...Ted...

WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
That is looking just great Ted. I am still stunned at how well your pilot and his kit looks. Are you going to have the canopy partially or fully open? It would be a bugger to hide him IMHO.

Cheers, Vic
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Joined: January 3rd, 2010, 9:51 pm

March 24th, 2011, 1:59 pm #7

I was hoping this would be the last - finished - post on the Big Spit project but events have dictated otherwise (deep sigh). Okay, we left off here, with test fitting the wings to fuselage:

I used a piece of sharpened brass rod to better define the fastners around the engine cowling. Place, push and twist...place, push and twist:

At the rear of the underwing radiator, some reinforcing rod and actuator details were added using scraps of stretched sprue:

These early Spits had fabric ailerons which I replicated using 1mm (approx) strips of Tamiya masking tape, sealed in with a layer of Tamiya Extra Thin Liquid Plastic Cement. This was a tip I saw Mike Grant use in a recent build article on an Airfix Sopwith Pup. It worked great:

Blocks of clear plastic sprue were glued into the wingtip light housings, sanded smooth and coated with Future before masking:

Wings and fuselage were finally mated with a strip of masking tape applied to gain the proper dihedral on the wings:

The overall wing to fuselage fit was pretty darn good. I just needed a little filler around the lower wing joint, near the nose:

I made sure to mark and then mask off the spot where the kit stand will meet the aircraft. I want a good, solid plastic-on-plastic weld here:

The gunsight features a new mount and a piece of plastic rod underneath to make it look more like the real thing:

I noticed some small plastic dimples on the rear canopy portion and decided to sand them smooth. After sanding with progressively finer grits of sandpaper, I then swabbed on a coat of Future expecting the canopy to magically 'clear up.' Uh...it didn't happen:

Blast! I should have left it alone. Plan B: sand away 1mm of kit canopy, fill it with two-part epoxy putty, and jam a stick into it in an effort to stretch-form a replacement:


I took a piece of clear plastic from the lid of a shirt box and installed it in my handy-dandy stretch-forming jig: two pieces of wood panelling held together with small nuts and bolts. Stove on high, oven mitt in hand, we rotate same in quick fashion until plastic sags:

When the plastic tightens up again, we remove from stove and plunge said stick-canopy combination into soft plastic. Seconds later the whole works will harden solid and then it's just a matter of cutting and trim-sanding the new canopy piece:



Finally! Some paint:

And then more paint. This is where we're at now. Some Tamiya Sky acrylic on the undersides:

More soon, hopefully...
As I'm sure many of you are aware, Allied airmen are in the air this night over Libya. I know a lot of Air Force folks here in Canada, and with your permission, I'd like to offer the following prayer for them and all the other Allied fliers and support personnel doing what they have to do. (These are not my words, but the slightly abridged words of a Canadian writer):
"Dear Lord our Creator, you are present everywhere anyone can be.
When you speak, the crooked is made straight and the waves of the sea fall still.
You make the clouds your chariot and you walk on the wings of the winds.
Oh Creator, protect I pray our dear ones who are far away and fight.
And bring each of them, wherever they may be, safe to their journey's rest." Amen!
Best...Ted...

WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
Am definitely going to try that vac-forming now. The Big Spit gets better each post!

And am with you on your thoughts/prayers - was listening to pilots/crews over ATC last night. Really brings home their professionalism and duty.

Best wishes,

Dermot
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 10:18 pm

March 24th, 2011, 5:53 pm #8

Listen what happened: a friend of mine, who is an amateur movie director and producer, is planning to make a film on the story of a family of my town during the war period. Although it is not a war movie, he is planning to include a scene depicting a fact actually happened in 1944: a Spitfire of SAAF strafed a civilian train, killing many passengers. And...he asked ME to build a Spitfire model to be used as "special effect" in his movie! Of course I'm going to do it "in flight" and with motorized propeller to make it the best possible "actor" for this movie. Plan B is to make it with non-motorized but freely spinning prop, to be blown with an hairdryer. Let's see...
Congratulations on landing your first movie contract! Be sure to post a movie trailer video! I'm not a movie director, but I've done a fair bit of tv work. I'm guessing the special effects people would prefer a model with a free-spinning prop, and not mounted on a stand. By hanging the model from thin wires or clear fibres in front of a green screen, they can pose it in many different angles to be filmed. Probably easier than trying to "crop out" a fixed airplane stand. Cool project - and you're just the guy for it!
Best...Ted...

WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9; The Big Spit Pt.10;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
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Like
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 10:18 pm

March 24th, 2011, 6:00 pm #9

..to 1972 when I built My first superkit...It's the wires I think....and great save on the canopy,I've never done any moulding,but You show there's no fear involved!

I share the sentiments in Your Prayer..


Keep Sticking!

Cheers, Pete
...But a few anxious moments, Pete. The canopy actually took two tries - muffed up the first attempt but good when I plunged said canopy-stick in at a wonky angle. Lop-sided canopy, anyone? And the plastic off the shirt box took a while to soften - that wood frame was starting to smoke when I yanked it away from the stove! I better ahve someone standing by with a fire extinguisher next time.
Best...Ted...

WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9; The Big Spit Pt.10;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
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Like
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 10:18 pm

March 24th, 2011, 6:06 pm #10

That is looking just great Ted. I am still stunned at how well your pilot and his kit looks. Are you going to have the canopy partially or fully open? It would be a bugger to hide him IMHO.

Cheers, Vic
The kit canopy is designed to slide back and forth and a good thing, too! There's no way I'm going to hide all those interior cockpit goodies if I can help it. I even toyed with the idea of making a working hinge for the fuselage door just so I could get a better peek inside. I gave it a pass in the interest of speeding the build along but...jeez...now I kinda wish I would have done it anyway. Ah well, this big bird has me drooling over getting the Hurricane and the Me109 in this series. Maybe I'll get another crack at a cockpit door hinge after all! Thanks for the comments and encouragement, pal!
Best...Ted...

WIP Build:
The Big Spit Pt.1; The Big Spit Pt.2; The Big Spit Pt.3; The Big Spit Pt.4; The Big Spit Pt.5; The Big Spit Pt.6;
The Big Spit Pt.7; The Big Spit Pt.8; The Big Spit Pt.9; The Big Spit Pt.10;


Previous WIP Builds:
Vickers Tank Pt.1; Vickers Tank Pt.2; Vickers Tank Pt.3; Vickers Tank Pt.4; Vickers Tank Pt.5; Vickers Tank Pt.6; Vickers Tank Finish;
Connies Pt.1; Connies Pt.2; Connies Pt.3; Connies Pt.4; Connies Pt.5; Connies Pt.6; Connies Pt.7; Connies Finish

Tall Tales:
Cold War Incident
The Lucky Mig
Quote
Like
Share