So this year I work on figures!!! Where do I start?

So this year I work on figures!!! Where do I start?

Joined: September 9th, 2008, 3:18 am

January 30th, 2009, 4:21 am #1

So this year I work on figures!!! Where do I start?

Love WWII and older. Normally build in 1/35 or 1/48.
Looking to get good at figures to enhance my tank and softskin projects.

Best books? Articles? Tools? Paints? Sites?

TanksPlus
Don C.
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Jim Mc
Jim Mc

January 30th, 2009, 1:47 pm #2

www.timelinesforums.com


step one may be deciding what medium you will paint with. Oils? Acrylics? Enamels?

Sign up, and don't be afraid to ask questions. Everyone starts somewhere, and rthe only way to learn is to ASK.
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David Nickels
David Nickels

January 30th, 2009, 2:37 pm #3

So this year I work on figures!!! Where do I start?

Love WWII and older. Normally build in 1/35 or 1/48.
Looking to get good at figures to enhance my tank and softskin projects.

Best books? Articles? Tools? Paints? Sites?

TanksPlus
Don C.
No matter what scale you pick to work on, but GOOD QUALITY figures to practice with. That may sound wasteful, but its much harder to paint so so plastic figures compared to a top notch resin or metal figure. If you mess one up, you can always strip it and repaint. But you will find the sharaper details, better facial features, etc. make painting much easier. On poor, blobby fogures, you have to really be good at creating your own shadows and highlights and painting in all the detail the sculptor wasn't able to provide.
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Jim Mc
Jim Mc

January 30th, 2009, 5:43 pm #4

don't skimp on brushes. I cannot tell you how many times I took the cheap route. My brushes always lloked like carp, and my painting didn't get any better. Then, as a gift, I was given a set of Winsor and Newton Series 7 brushes... It very quickly became very clear to me just how important brushes are. if you choose to use acrylics, you probably will not want sable brushes, as the paint tends to beat the crud out of them,(same holds true for enamels).
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ironmike
ironmike

January 30th, 2009, 7:25 pm #5

So this year I work on figures!!! Where do I start?

Love WWII and older. Normally build in 1/35 or 1/48.
Looking to get good at figures to enhance my tank and softskin projects.

Best books? Articles? Tools? Paints? Sites?

TanksPlus
Don C.
I'd stick with Dragon, MasterBox or Mini Art figiures (be prepared to replace many of the heads with those from Hornet) especially with the Mini Art figures.
As others mentioned, get some decent brushes, thinner and quality paint.
I'd recommend Shep Paine's classic book on dioramas and figure painting. Lots of help there on various web sites.
Happy modelling,
Ironmike
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Anonymous
Anonymous

January 31st, 2009, 4:40 pm #6

So this year I work on figures!!! Where do I start?

Love WWII and older. Normally build in 1/35 or 1/48.
Looking to get good at figures to enhance my tank and softskin projects.

Best books? Articles? Tools? Paints? Sites?

TanksPlus
Don C.
Hi Don,

First, I'm happy to see that someone is trying the wonderful world of figure modeling!!!! I must warn you that you gonna love it so much that you're not gonna be interested in other stuff anymore!!!

To help you start, like it was mentioned before, take time to read about painting figures. There are good website like http://www.planetfigure.com/
or http://www.timelinesforum.com/ and http://www.figurines-tv.com/kws/ (which is a french site but good videos). There are good books also you can try to find to help you with painting. Look for Shep Paine books. Also Lynn Kessler and Bill Horan have good books on the subject. I recommend also some Osprey books like Modelling Waffen-SS fgures by Calvin Tan. Ginno Pope is a good modeler too. Google his name to get some articles.

Now about the choice of medium, acrylic or oils or even enamel, this is a personal choice. You have to experiment and make up your mind about each one. I personally prefer oils but I try acrylic from time to time and I begin to like it. Basically each medium has his pros and cons.

Oil give you time to blend and easy to mix your own color. I have only 8 tubes of color, (Windsor & Newton is the brand I use)- Titanium white - Black Mars - Raw Umber - Burnt Sienna - Yellow Ochre - Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Red and French Ultramarine blue. With these colors, I'm able to mix any colors I want. It will be also very easy to blend. The down side is sometimes, it is hard to get flat colors. You can use lighter fluid to dilute the paint and it will help a bit. And you can even use a flat coat after the paint has dried. There is some odourless thinner that also can be used to dilute the paint or clean your brushes to prevent the bad smell.

Acrylics, on the other hand, will dry very fast and very flat. Flat colors are preferable for painting figure. The only problem is that you have to work in successive layers to achieve a good blending. It take time and you have to be patient but the results are stunning!!! Easy to dilute with water and a tiny drop of alcohol. Easy to clean your brushes too. There is some good brands like Gamesworkshop, P3 Priveteer Press, Vallejo color. There is also Andrea but I never tried it before.

Enamel is about between those two mediums. More time to blend but got the smell. You can work in layers too. I never really tried it before cause I really like oils and the way I can blend the colors. I know that Bill Horan, a master painter, only use this medium. Google his name if you don't know him!

As for tools, you need brushes. Now, it was mentioned that good brushes is a critical element of the success on painting figure. It is absolutely true. Buy the best brushes you can find. For oils, I use only Series 7, Finest Sable, Windsor & Newton. For acrylics, I recommend Raphaël, 8084, Martre Kolinsky. These will sell between 15 to 30$ depending the size. I got a good range of sizes: 000, 00, 0, 1, 2. You can by even 5/0 or even 10/0 but it is a bit too small. To mix the oil colors, I used a piece of glass with white paper taped to the bottom to help me see the colors. You can use whatever you like. For acrylic, you can use a wet palet which will help you to keep the paint from drying to fast on your palet. You have to use a paper towel in a plate and put water in the plate. Then, you use a piece of parchment paper to cover the soaked paper towel. This will allow the water to keep the paint wet. Heres a French video on the subject http://www.apprendrefacile.com/cours-vi ... e-peinture

And for the subject, you mentioned WWII 1/35 or 1/48. As for me, I prefer bigger size 90mm or 120mm (1/16th scale) cause 1/48 is too small for me. You have to buy good figures cause the little details would be easier to see like the eyes and ears or fingers. Early Tamiya figures are really bad. I mean the casting is rough. Today, you can buy good 1/35 figures. Alpine, Dragon, Verlinden, Pegaso, Andrea Miniatures have good WWII figures. Some are made in resin or white metal and also plastic. I prefer white metal cause the details are really crisp. Resin figures have also really crisp details. The downside would the price. Between 15 to 30$ a figure. But you still can find some really good deals on E-Bay.

So basically, these are some points to help you start. If you need more advices, dont hesitate to contact me. I will try to help you the best I can..

Enjoy

Clarence Prigent
Gatineau, Quebec
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Joined: September 9th, 2008, 3:18 am

February 8th, 2009, 2:51 pm #7

The info you gave me has been very helpful...EXPENSIVE but helpful

Local art supply store thinks I'm crazy using thier most expensive oils and brushes for little toy soldiers!!!


Don C.
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Joined: August 27th, 2004, 6:53 pm

February 8th, 2009, 6:41 pm #8

www.timelinesforums.com


step one may be deciding what medium you will paint with. Oils? Acrylics? Enamels?

Sign up, and don't be afraid to ask questions. Everyone starts somewhere, and rthe only way to learn is to ASK.
.

"Max Flex" The key to Naval Success
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