Scratch build of an RAF F.E.2b in 1/72 scale

Scratch build of an RAF F.E.2b in 1/72 scale

Joined: April 17th, 2012, 3:47 am

May 4th, 2012, 4:36 am #1

While building my F.E.2b, I did some searching on the internet and found this group. I also found Dan's excellent model of the F.E.2b as well. Although, I did not go to the detail level that Dan did for his model, my intent was to give a close representation of the F.E.2b since it is to be used as a game piece in a table top miniatures game. All of the models I have been building lately have been WW1 aircraft for the express purpose as game pieces. For this reason, you may note on the finished model, several rigging details left off as well as interior detail. Even the guns are not true Lewis guns, but to the untrained eye, pass as acceptable.

As noted above, this model is a scratch build. I came across a vac-form kit by Formaplane a couple years ago and finally got around to looking at it last september. While looking at the panel of bumps to be used as parts, I felt that I could possibly make all the parts from sheet styrene and not use the materials provided. If I could manage to do this, it would mean I could build as many of this plane as I dare just by using the drawings provided as a guide.

[/IMG]

Fabricating the fuselage nacelle seemed as though it might pose a problem at first, but as I looked at the shape, I was able to mentally divide it into sections to work on. First, the floor.
I knew that the shape of the floor would be very close to the overall shape of the nacelle, so I cut a rectangular piece slightly longer and wider than needed and began shaping it to the correct taper from the front to back. I then stacked several pieces cut from 0.040" sheet styrene and used MEK to quickly bond them together to make a block of styrene. This, I began carving to shape the nose of the nacelle and half of the cockpit opening for the observer. Using only an exacto knife and the large emery boards to shape the parts, I was able to fabricate the nacelle over a one week period of a couple hours a night.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Next, the wings. The foil shape cross section of a wing is the major hurdle to over come when fabricating a wing. I used the above method of lamination to solve this problem as well. I first had to decide if I was going to make the wing as one piece and cut it into sections to add the dihedral later, or just build the wings in seven seperate pieces. I chose the later approach. I felt I could control the quality better with smaller individual parts than with one larger one. I began with building the parts for the lower starboard wing. Beginning with the leading edge using a narrow strip cut from 0.040" sheet styrene. On top of that, I added a strip cut from 0.020" sheet styrene which was about twice as wide. Then, a strip cut from 0.010" sheet styrene cut a little bit wider than needed for the wing. The pieces where stacked slight offset towards the rear of the wing as each layer was added. Once assembled, shaping started at the leading edge rounding it over creating the foil shape as I went. The under side was sanded as smooth as possible to create the concave contour and putty filled in the seams that remained. The end result after cutting out the aileron is as follows:

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Before moving on with assembly, I worked on adding a few details to the nacelle. I fabricated the intake vents from sheet stock scraps, built a platform for the pilot seat I borrowed from the spares box, and fabricated the seat for the observer.

[/IMG]

I then moved onward and completed the rest of the wing sections and the tail plane. I added the ribbing to the wing sections and tail plane by using 0.010" x 0.020" strip stock styrene layed across the part over the drawing for alignment and touching it with a brush of MEK. Once dry, I sanded the ribs to shape. I then added the wing root sections of the lower wing to the nacelle using 0.012" brass wire as pins. The joints were made with MEK, then ACC with activator and then faired in with white putty and sanded.

[/IMG]

I moved on to building a close approximation of the Beardmore engine. The top of the engine was all I needed to make and then mount to the platform at the back of the nacelle. I visited my spares box once again and found an engine part that came from a Roden Albatros kit, which always has extra parts. I removed the cylinders from the part and aligned them on the block I fabricated. I used a section from a paper clip for the propeller shaft and made sure it would be able to turn as it was mounted in the block. I then completed the engine with other engine detail parts from the spares box. I finished the engine by had carving the twin exhaust pipes which are actually too large to be accurate. After mounting the engine, I painted the assembly in order to make it easier to see everything.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

The rudder posed little problems other than my first one was too thin and needed to be at least 0.030" thick to allow for the brass wire hinge pin.

[/IMG]

I set my deadline for completing this model for April 2012, hence the serial number used on the rudder.

Next, the tail boom. The boom was made from brass wire. The vertical wires are all 0.012" brass wire while the horizontal wires are 0.063". Soldering was the only method that proved to be the most reliable in strength.

[/IMG]

Once I had added all the struts and rigging to the boom, the tail plane and rudder were added. The struts on the boom were made by laminating two halfs around the brass wire and then shaping in place. The rigging is all 2lb test fishing line. I have found this to be the best material to work with for me due to it's ease of use and durability in handling.

Once the rigging was completed, some painting was done and then the assembly was added to the fuselage assembly after dressing up the boom ends and using JB Weld to attach.

[/IMG]

Once the JB Weld cured, I took this shot:

[/IMG]

At this stage, the next thing to do was make struts and add the top center wing section. Each strut was made from strip stock cut from 0.020" sheet stock and scribed for the 0.012" brass wire core. The wings were drilled with a #80 drill for the brass pins and the rigging lines. Once the top center wing was added with JB Weld to the boom, the struts were slipped into place and then the assembly rigged.

[/IMG]

A few more details are then added to the fuselage and then the early style landing gear is assembled onto the underside using wire and strip styrene reinforced with wire.

[/IMG]

The wings are the only major assembly left to do and each strut needed to be made, added with the wings and rigged. The wings were added with brass pins as before.

[/IMG]

Decals, wing skids, guns, and tail skid are all that remain to be added now. The tail skid was I nice little puzzle to build, but after a few hours, I was able to complete the model.

[/IMG]

I managed to meet my deadline and was able to take it with me to a recent game convention. I am looking forward to my next scratch build project... the AGO C.I.

John
Last edited by Bolman on May 27th, 2012, 6:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 12th, 2005, 2:37 am

May 4th, 2012, 10:30 am #2

George, out.............
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Joined: June 4th, 2008, 11:45 pm

May 4th, 2012, 1:21 pm #3

While building my F.E.2b, I did some searching on the internet and found this group. I also found Dan's excellent model of the F.E.2b as well. Although, I did not go to the detail level that Dan did for his model, my intent was to give a close representation of the F.E.2b since it is to be used as a game piece in a table top miniatures game. All of the models I have been building lately have been WW1 aircraft for the express purpose as game pieces. For this reason, you may note on the finished model, several rigging details left off as well as interior detail. Even the guns are not true Lewis guns, but to the untrained eye, pass as acceptable.

As noted above, this model is a scratch build. I came across a vac-form kit by Formaplane a couple years ago and finally got around to looking at it last september. While looking at the panel of bumps to be used as parts, I felt that I could possibly make all the parts from sheet styrene and not use the materials provided. If I could manage to do this, it would mean I could build as many of this plane as I dare just by using the drawings provided as a guide.

[/IMG]

Fabricating the fuselage nacelle seemed as though it might pose a problem at first, but as I looked at the shape, I was able to mentally divide it into sections to work on. First, the floor.
I knew that the shape of the floor would be very close to the overall shape of the nacelle, so I cut a rectangular piece slightly longer and wider than needed and began shaping it to the correct taper from the front to back. I then stacked several pieces cut from 0.040" sheet styrene and used MEK to quickly bond them together to make a block of styrene. This, I began carving to shape the nose of the nacelle and half of the cockpit opening for the observer. Using only an exacto knife and the large emery boards to shape the parts, I was able to fabricate the nacelle over a one week period of a couple hours a night.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Next, the wings. The foil shape cross section of a wing is the major hurdle to over come when fabricating a wing. I used the above method of lamination to solve this problem as well. I first had to decide if I was going to make the wing as one piece and cut it into sections to add the dihedral later, or just build the wings in seven seperate pieces. I chose the later approach. I felt I could control the quality better with smaller individual parts than with one larger one. I began with building the parts for the lower starboard wing. Beginning with the leading edge using a narrow strip cut from 0.040" sheet styrene. On top of that, I added a strip cut from 0.020" sheet styrene which was about twice as wide. Then, a strip cut from 0.010" sheet styrene cut a little bit wider than needed for the wing. The pieces where stacked slight offset towards the rear of the wing as each layer was added. Once assembled, shaping started at the leading edge rounding it over creating the foil shape as I went. The under side was sanded as smooth as possible to create the concave contour and putty filled in the seams that remained. The end result after cutting out the aileron is as follows:

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Before moving on with assembly, I worked on adding a few details to the nacelle. I fabricated the intake vents from sheet stock scraps, built a platform for the pilot seat I borrowed from the spares box, and fabricated the seat for the observer.

[/IMG]

I then moved onward and completed the rest of the wing sections and the tail plane. I added the ribbing to the wing sections and tail plane by using 0.010" x 0.020" strip stock styrene layed across the part over the drawing for alignment and touching it with a brush of MEK. Once dry, I sanded the ribs to shape. I then added the wing root sections of the lower wing to the nacelle using 0.012" brass wire as pins. The joints were made with MEK, then ACC with activator and then faired in with white putty and sanded.

[/IMG]

I moved on to building a close approximation of the Beardmore engine. The top of the engine was all I needed to make and then mount to the platform at the back of the nacelle. I visited my spares box once again and found an engine part that came from a Roden Albatros kit, which always has extra parts. I removed the cylinders from the part and aligned them on the block I fabricated. I used a section from a paper clip for the propeller shaft and made sure it would be able to turn as it was mounted in the block. I then completed the engine with other engine detail parts from the spares box. I finished the engine by had carving the twin exhaust pipes which are actually too large to be accurate. After mounting the engine, I painted the assembly in order to make it easier to see everything.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

The rudder posed little problems other than my first one was too thin and needed to be at least 0.030" thick to allow for the brass wire hinge pin.

[/IMG]

I set my deadline for completing this model for April 2012, hence the serial number used on the rudder.

Next, the tail boom. The boom was made from brass wire. The vertical wires are all 0.012" brass wire while the horizontal wires are 0.063". Soldering was the only method that proved to be the most reliable in strength.

[/IMG]

Once I had added all the struts and rigging to the boom, the tail plane and rudder were added. The struts on the boom were made by laminating two halfs around the brass wire and then shaping in place. The rigging is all 2lb test fishing line. I have found this to be the best material to work with for me due to it's ease of use and durability in handling.

Once the rigging was completed, some painting was done and then the assembly was added to the fuselage assembly after dressing up the boom ends and using JB Weld to attach.

[/IMG]

Once the JB Weld cured, I took this shot:

[/IMG]

At this stage, the next thing to do was make struts and add the top center wing section. Each strut was made from strip stock cut from 0.020" sheet stock and scribed for the 0.012" brass wire core. The wings were drilled with a #80 drill for the brass pins and the rigging lines. Once the top center wing was added with JB Weld to the boom, the struts were slipped into place and then the assembly rigged.

[/IMG]

A few more details are then added to the fuselage and then the early style landing gear is assembled onto the underside using wire and strip styrene reinforced with wire.

[/IMG]

The wings are the only major assembly left to do and each strut needed to be made, added with the wings and rigged. The wings were added with brass pins as before.

[/IMG]

Decals, wing skids, guns, and tail skid are all that remain to be added now. The tail skid was I nice little puzzle to build, but after a few hours, I was able to complete the model.

[/IMG]

I managed to meet my deadline and was able to take it with me to a recent game convention. I am looking forward to my next scratch build project... the AGO C.I.

John
Wow, two of these in the space of a few months. You guys put us kit bashers to shame.

Cheers,

Andrew

Tutorials: Plasticene wheel wells Cheap vacform machine Example vac-form
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Joined: April 2nd, 2007, 11:33 pm

May 4th, 2012, 4:18 pm #4

While building my F.E.2b, I did some searching on the internet and found this group. I also found Dan's excellent model of the F.E.2b as well. Although, I did not go to the detail level that Dan did for his model, my intent was to give a close representation of the F.E.2b since it is to be used as a game piece in a table top miniatures game. All of the models I have been building lately have been WW1 aircraft for the express purpose as game pieces. For this reason, you may note on the finished model, several rigging details left off as well as interior detail. Even the guns are not true Lewis guns, but to the untrained eye, pass as acceptable.

As noted above, this model is a scratch build. I came across a vac-form kit by Formaplane a couple years ago and finally got around to looking at it last september. While looking at the panel of bumps to be used as parts, I felt that I could possibly make all the parts from sheet styrene and not use the materials provided. If I could manage to do this, it would mean I could build as many of this plane as I dare just by using the drawings provided as a guide.

[/IMG]

Fabricating the fuselage nacelle seemed as though it might pose a problem at first, but as I looked at the shape, I was able to mentally divide it into sections to work on. First, the floor.
I knew that the shape of the floor would be very close to the overall shape of the nacelle, so I cut a rectangular piece slightly longer and wider than needed and began shaping it to the correct taper from the front to back. I then stacked several pieces cut from 0.040" sheet styrene and used MEK to quickly bond them together to make a block of styrene. This, I began carving to shape the nose of the nacelle and half of the cockpit opening for the observer. Using only an exacto knife and the large emery boards to shape the parts, I was able to fabricate the nacelle over a one week period of a couple hours a night.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Next, the wings. The foil shape cross section of a wing is the major hurdle to over come when fabricating a wing. I used the above method of lamination to solve this problem as well. I first had to decide if I was going to make the wing as one piece and cut it into sections to add the dihedral later, or just build the wings in seven seperate pieces. I chose the later approach. I felt I could control the quality better with smaller individual parts than with one larger one. I began with building the parts for the lower starboard wing. Beginning with the leading edge using a narrow strip cut from 0.040" sheet styrene. On top of that, I added a strip cut from 0.020" sheet styrene which was about twice as wide. Then, a strip cut from 0.010" sheet styrene cut a little bit wider than needed for the wing. The pieces where stacked slight offset towards the rear of the wing as each layer was added. Once assembled, shaping started at the leading edge rounding it over creating the foil shape as I went. The under side was sanded as smooth as possible to create the concave contour and putty filled in the seams that remained. The end result after cutting out the aileron is as follows:

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Before moving on with assembly, I worked on adding a few details to the nacelle. I fabricated the intake vents from sheet stock scraps, built a platform for the pilot seat I borrowed from the spares box, and fabricated the seat for the observer.

[/IMG]

I then moved onward and completed the rest of the wing sections and the tail plane. I added the ribbing to the wing sections and tail plane by using 0.010" x 0.020" strip stock styrene layed across the part over the drawing for alignment and touching it with a brush of MEK. Once dry, I sanded the ribs to shape. I then added the wing root sections of the lower wing to the nacelle using 0.012" brass wire as pins. The joints were made with MEK, then ACC with activator and then faired in with white putty and sanded.

[/IMG]

I moved on to building a close approximation of the Beardmore engine. The top of the engine was all I needed to make and then mount to the platform at the back of the nacelle. I visited my spares box once again and found an engine part that came from a Roden Albatros kit, which always has extra parts. I removed the cylinders from the part and aligned them on the block I fabricated. I used a section from a paper clip for the propeller shaft and made sure it would be able to turn as it was mounted in the block. I then completed the engine with other engine detail parts from the spares box. I finished the engine by had carving the twin exhaust pipes which are actually too large to be accurate. After mounting the engine, I painted the assembly in order to make it easier to see everything.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

The rudder posed little problems other than my first one was too thin and needed to be at least 0.030" thick to allow for the brass wire hinge pin.

[/IMG]

I set my deadline for completing this model for April 2012, hence the serial number used on the rudder.

Next, the tail boom. The boom was made from brass wire. The vertical wires are all 0.012" brass wire while the horizontal wires are 0.063". Soldering was the only method that proved to be the most reliable in strength.

[/IMG]

Once I had added all the struts and rigging to the boom, the tail plane and rudder were added. The struts on the boom were made by laminating two halfs around the brass wire and then shaping in place. The rigging is all 2lb test fishing line. I have found this to be the best material to work with for me due to it's ease of use and durability in handling.

Once the rigging was completed, some painting was done and then the assembly was added to the fuselage assembly after dressing up the boom ends and using JB Weld to attach.

[/IMG]

Once the JB Weld cured, I took this shot:

[/IMG]

At this stage, the next thing to do was make struts and add the top center wing section. Each strut was made from strip stock cut from 0.020" sheet stock and scribed for the 0.012" brass wire core. The wings were drilled with a #80 drill for the brass pins and the rigging lines. Once the top center wing was added with JB Weld to the boom, the struts were slipped into place and then the assembly rigged.

[/IMG]

A few more details are then added to the fuselage and then the early style landing gear is assembled onto the underside using wire and strip styrene reinforced with wire.

[/IMG]

The wings are the only major assembly left to do and each strut needed to be made, added with the wings and rigged. The wings were added with brass pins as before.

[/IMG]

Decals, wing skids, guns, and tail skid are all that remain to be added now. The tail skid was I nice little puzzle to build, but after a few hours, I was able to complete the model.

[/IMG]

I managed to meet my deadline and was able to take it with me to a recent game convention. I am looking forward to my next scratch build project... the AGO C.I.

John
It was fun looking at all your shots and text since it was oh-so-familiar to me! Fun to see how you tackled problems too. I love you wings as mine are way too flat in cross section...they look like thin boards with strips of paint on them at rib locations.

But I have to say, it's too pretty and well done for a game model!

Excellent finish. What a cool plane with oodles of character.

Cheers.
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Chester
Chester

May 4th, 2012, 5:39 pm #5

While building my F.E.2b, I did some searching on the internet and found this group. I also found Dan's excellent model of the F.E.2b as well. Although, I did not go to the detail level that Dan did for his model, my intent was to give a close representation of the F.E.2b since it is to be used as a game piece in a table top miniatures game. All of the models I have been building lately have been WW1 aircraft for the express purpose as game pieces. For this reason, you may note on the finished model, several rigging details left off as well as interior detail. Even the guns are not true Lewis guns, but to the untrained eye, pass as acceptable.

As noted above, this model is a scratch build. I came across a vac-form kit by Formaplane a couple years ago and finally got around to looking at it last september. While looking at the panel of bumps to be used as parts, I felt that I could possibly make all the parts from sheet styrene and not use the materials provided. If I could manage to do this, it would mean I could build as many of this plane as I dare just by using the drawings provided as a guide.

[/IMG]

Fabricating the fuselage nacelle seemed as though it might pose a problem at first, but as I looked at the shape, I was able to mentally divide it into sections to work on. First, the floor.
I knew that the shape of the floor would be very close to the overall shape of the nacelle, so I cut a rectangular piece slightly longer and wider than needed and began shaping it to the correct taper from the front to back. I then stacked several pieces cut from 0.040" sheet styrene and used MEK to quickly bond them together to make a block of styrene. This, I began carving to shape the nose of the nacelle and half of the cockpit opening for the observer. Using only an exacto knife and the large emery boards to shape the parts, I was able to fabricate the nacelle over a one week period of a couple hours a night.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Next, the wings. The foil shape cross section of a wing is the major hurdle to over come when fabricating a wing. I used the above method of lamination to solve this problem as well. I first had to decide if I was going to make the wing as one piece and cut it into sections to add the dihedral later, or just build the wings in seven seperate pieces. I chose the later approach. I felt I could control the quality better with smaller individual parts than with one larger one. I began with building the parts for the lower starboard wing. Beginning with the leading edge using a narrow strip cut from 0.040" sheet styrene. On top of that, I added a strip cut from 0.020" sheet styrene which was about twice as wide. Then, a strip cut from 0.010" sheet styrene cut a little bit wider than needed for the wing. The pieces where stacked slight offset towards the rear of the wing as each layer was added. Once assembled, shaping started at the leading edge rounding it over creating the foil shape as I went. The under side was sanded as smooth as possible to create the concave contour and putty filled in the seams that remained. The end result after cutting out the aileron is as follows:

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Before moving on with assembly, I worked on adding a few details to the nacelle. I fabricated the intake vents from sheet stock scraps, built a platform for the pilot seat I borrowed from the spares box, and fabricated the seat for the observer.

[/IMG]

I then moved onward and completed the rest of the wing sections and the tail plane. I added the ribbing to the wing sections and tail plane by using 0.010" x 0.020" strip stock styrene layed across the part over the drawing for alignment and touching it with a brush of MEK. Once dry, I sanded the ribs to shape. I then added the wing root sections of the lower wing to the nacelle using 0.012" brass wire as pins. The joints were made with MEK, then ACC with activator and then faired in with white putty and sanded.

[/IMG]

I moved on to building a close approximation of the Beardmore engine. The top of the engine was all I needed to make and then mount to the platform at the back of the nacelle. I visited my spares box once again and found an engine part that came from a Roden Albatros kit, which always has extra parts. I removed the cylinders from the part and aligned them on the block I fabricated. I used a section from a paper clip for the propeller shaft and made sure it would be able to turn as it was mounted in the block. I then completed the engine with other engine detail parts from the spares box. I finished the engine by had carving the twin exhaust pipes which are actually too large to be accurate. After mounting the engine, I painted the assembly in order to make it easier to see everything.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

The rudder posed little problems other than my first one was too thin and needed to be at least 0.030" thick to allow for the brass wire hinge pin.

[/IMG]

I set my deadline for completing this model for April 2012, hence the serial number used on the rudder.

Next, the tail boom. The boom was made from brass wire. The vertical wires are all 0.012" brass wire while the horizontal wires are 0.063". Soldering was the only method that proved to be the most reliable in strength.

[/IMG]

Once I had added all the struts and rigging to the boom, the tail plane and rudder were added. The struts on the boom were made by laminating two halfs around the brass wire and then shaping in place. The rigging is all 2lb test fishing line. I have found this to be the best material to work with for me due to it's ease of use and durability in handling.

Once the rigging was completed, some painting was done and then the assembly was added to the fuselage assembly after dressing up the boom ends and using JB Weld to attach.

[/IMG]

Once the JB Weld cured, I took this shot:

[/IMG]

At this stage, the next thing to do was make struts and add the top center wing section. Each strut was made from strip stock cut from 0.020" sheet stock and scribed for the 0.012" brass wire core. The wings were drilled with a #80 drill for the brass pins and the rigging lines. Once the top center wing was added with JB Weld to the boom, the struts were slipped into place and then the assembly rigged.

[/IMG]

A few more details are then added to the fuselage and then the early style landing gear is assembled onto the underside using wire and strip styrene reinforced with wire.

[/IMG]

The wings are the only major assembly left to do and each strut needed to be made, added with the wings and rigged. The wings were added with brass pins as before.

[/IMG]

Decals, wing skids, guns, and tail skid are all that remain to be added now. The tail skid was I nice little puzzle to build, but after a few hours, I was able to complete the model.

[/IMG]

I managed to meet my deadline and was able to take it with me to a recent game convention. I am looking forward to my next scratch build project... the AGO C.I.

John
You sir, are a true modeler.
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Joined: April 17th, 2012, 3:47 am

May 4th, 2012, 9:25 pm #6

It was fun looking at all your shots and text since it was oh-so-familiar to me! Fun to see how you tackled problems too. I love you wings as mine are way too flat in cross section...they look like thin boards with strips of paint on them at rib locations.

But I have to say, it's too pretty and well done for a game model!

Excellent finish. What a cool plane with oodles of character.

Cheers.
Thought I'd share a few shots of a few others I've done for the game...

Morane-Saulnier "I"
[/IMG]

Sopwith Triplane
[/IMG]

Pfalz D.XII
[/IMG]

Fokker Dr.I
[/IMG]

Sopwith Camel
[/IMG]

RAF S.E.5a
[/IMG]

Hannover CL.IIIa
[/IMG]

I didn't rig all of them due to the individual requesting certain ones built asking not to put the time into it.
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Joined: April 17th, 2012, 3:47 am

May 4th, 2012, 10:34 pm #7

While building my F.E.2b, I did some searching on the internet and found this group. I also found Dan's excellent model of the F.E.2b as well. Although, I did not go to the detail level that Dan did for his model, my intent was to give a close representation of the F.E.2b since it is to be used as a game piece in a table top miniatures game. All of the models I have been building lately have been WW1 aircraft for the express purpose as game pieces. For this reason, you may note on the finished model, several rigging details left off as well as interior detail. Even the guns are not true Lewis guns, but to the untrained eye, pass as acceptable.

As noted above, this model is a scratch build. I came across a vac-form kit by Formaplane a couple years ago and finally got around to looking at it last september. While looking at the panel of bumps to be used as parts, I felt that I could possibly make all the parts from sheet styrene and not use the materials provided. If I could manage to do this, it would mean I could build as many of this plane as I dare just by using the drawings provided as a guide.

[/IMG]

Fabricating the fuselage nacelle seemed as though it might pose a problem at first, but as I looked at the shape, I was able to mentally divide it into sections to work on. First, the floor.
I knew that the shape of the floor would be very close to the overall shape of the nacelle, so I cut a rectangular piece slightly longer and wider than needed and began shaping it to the correct taper from the front to back. I then stacked several pieces cut from 0.040" sheet styrene and used MEK to quickly bond them together to make a block of styrene. This, I began carving to shape the nose of the nacelle and half of the cockpit opening for the observer. Using only an exacto knife and the large emery boards to shape the parts, I was able to fabricate the nacelle over a one week period of a couple hours a night.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Next, the wings. The foil shape cross section of a wing is the major hurdle to over come when fabricating a wing. I used the above method of lamination to solve this problem as well. I first had to decide if I was going to make the wing as one piece and cut it into sections to add the dihedral later, or just build the wings in seven seperate pieces. I chose the later approach. I felt I could control the quality better with smaller individual parts than with one larger one. I began with building the parts for the lower starboard wing. Beginning with the leading edge using a narrow strip cut from 0.040" sheet styrene. On top of that, I added a strip cut from 0.020" sheet styrene which was about twice as wide. Then, a strip cut from 0.010" sheet styrene cut a little bit wider than needed for the wing. The pieces where stacked slight offset towards the rear of the wing as each layer was added. Once assembled, shaping started at the leading edge rounding it over creating the foil shape as I went. The under side was sanded as smooth as possible to create the concave contour and putty filled in the seams that remained. The end result after cutting out the aileron is as follows:

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Before moving on with assembly, I worked on adding a few details to the nacelle. I fabricated the intake vents from sheet stock scraps, built a platform for the pilot seat I borrowed from the spares box, and fabricated the seat for the observer.

[/IMG]

I then moved onward and completed the rest of the wing sections and the tail plane. I added the ribbing to the wing sections and tail plane by using 0.010" x 0.020" strip stock styrene layed across the part over the drawing for alignment and touching it with a brush of MEK. Once dry, I sanded the ribs to shape. I then added the wing root sections of the lower wing to the nacelle using 0.012" brass wire as pins. The joints were made with MEK, then ACC with activator and then faired in with white putty and sanded.

[/IMG]

I moved on to building a close approximation of the Beardmore engine. The top of the engine was all I needed to make and then mount to the platform at the back of the nacelle. I visited my spares box once again and found an engine part that came from a Roden Albatros kit, which always has extra parts. I removed the cylinders from the part and aligned them on the block I fabricated. I used a section from a paper clip for the propeller shaft and made sure it would be able to turn as it was mounted in the block. I then completed the engine with other engine detail parts from the spares box. I finished the engine by had carving the twin exhaust pipes which are actually too large to be accurate. After mounting the engine, I painted the assembly in order to make it easier to see everything.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

The rudder posed little problems other than my first one was too thin and needed to be at least 0.030" thick to allow for the brass wire hinge pin.

[/IMG]

I set my deadline for completing this model for April 2012, hence the serial number used on the rudder.

Next, the tail boom. The boom was made from brass wire. The vertical wires are all 0.012" brass wire while the horizontal wires are 0.063". Soldering was the only method that proved to be the most reliable in strength.

[/IMG]

Once I had added all the struts and rigging to the boom, the tail plane and rudder were added. The struts on the boom were made by laminating two halfs around the brass wire and then shaping in place. The rigging is all 2lb test fishing line. I have found this to be the best material to work with for me due to it's ease of use and durability in handling.

Once the rigging was completed, some painting was done and then the assembly was added to the fuselage assembly after dressing up the boom ends and using JB Weld to attach.

[/IMG]

Once the JB Weld cured, I took this shot:

[/IMG]

At this stage, the next thing to do was make struts and add the top center wing section. Each strut was made from strip stock cut from 0.020" sheet stock and scribed for the 0.012" brass wire core. The wings were drilled with a #80 drill for the brass pins and the rigging lines. Once the top center wing was added with JB Weld to the boom, the struts were slipped into place and then the assembly rigged.

[/IMG]

A few more details are then added to the fuselage and then the early style landing gear is assembled onto the underside using wire and strip styrene reinforced with wire.

[/IMG]

The wings are the only major assembly left to do and each strut needed to be made, added with the wings and rigged. The wings were added with brass pins as before.

[/IMG]

Decals, wing skids, guns, and tail skid are all that remain to be added now. The tail skid was I nice little puzzle to build, but after a few hours, I was able to complete the model.

[/IMG]

I managed to meet my deadline and was able to take it with me to a recent game convention. I am looking forward to my next scratch build project... the AGO C.I.

John
I'm an ex model railroader and just in the past few years have I been building aircraft. So far, I've completed 54 planes, have 13 in process, and over 90 kits yet to pull out of the closet. I'll be busy for a little while yet.

John
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Joined: April 2nd, 2007, 11:33 pm

May 4th, 2012, 10:47 pm #8

Thought I'd share a few shots of a few others I've done for the game...

Morane-Saulnier "I"
[/IMG]

Sopwith Triplane
[/IMG]

Pfalz D.XII
[/IMG]

Fokker Dr.I
[/IMG]

Sopwith Camel
[/IMG]

RAF S.E.5a
[/IMG]

Hannover CL.IIIa
[/IMG]

I didn't rig all of them due to the individual requesting certain ones built asking not to put the time into it.
...Your game pieces could be on contest tables. Well done.

What game system is it? Looks like lots of fun. I used to play "Richtofen's War", the old "Squad Leader" etc. Just curious. That could get very addictive.

Cheers.
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Joined: April 17th, 2012, 3:47 am

May 5th, 2012, 1:13 am #9

The game system is called Aerodrome 1.1.

Here is a shot of a game in action:

[/IMG]

John
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Joined: July 8th, 2008, 10:57 am

May 5th, 2012, 1:28 am #10

While building my F.E.2b, I did some searching on the internet and found this group. I also found Dan's excellent model of the F.E.2b as well. Although, I did not go to the detail level that Dan did for his model, my intent was to give a close representation of the F.E.2b since it is to be used as a game piece in a table top miniatures game. All of the models I have been building lately have been WW1 aircraft for the express purpose as game pieces. For this reason, you may note on the finished model, several rigging details left off as well as interior detail. Even the guns are not true Lewis guns, but to the untrained eye, pass as acceptable.

As noted above, this model is a scratch build. I came across a vac-form kit by Formaplane a couple years ago and finally got around to looking at it last september. While looking at the panel of bumps to be used as parts, I felt that I could possibly make all the parts from sheet styrene and not use the materials provided. If I could manage to do this, it would mean I could build as many of this plane as I dare just by using the drawings provided as a guide.

[/IMG]

Fabricating the fuselage nacelle seemed as though it might pose a problem at first, but as I looked at the shape, I was able to mentally divide it into sections to work on. First, the floor.
I knew that the shape of the floor would be very close to the overall shape of the nacelle, so I cut a rectangular piece slightly longer and wider than needed and began shaping it to the correct taper from the front to back. I then stacked several pieces cut from 0.040" sheet styrene and used MEK to quickly bond them together to make a block of styrene. This, I began carving to shape the nose of the nacelle and half of the cockpit opening for the observer. Using only an exacto knife and the large emery boards to shape the parts, I was able to fabricate the nacelle over a one week period of a couple hours a night.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Next, the wings. The foil shape cross section of a wing is the major hurdle to over come when fabricating a wing. I used the above method of lamination to solve this problem as well. I first had to decide if I was going to make the wing as one piece and cut it into sections to add the dihedral later, or just build the wings in seven seperate pieces. I chose the later approach. I felt I could control the quality better with smaller individual parts than with one larger one. I began with building the parts for the lower starboard wing. Beginning with the leading edge using a narrow strip cut from 0.040" sheet styrene. On top of that, I added a strip cut from 0.020" sheet styrene which was about twice as wide. Then, a strip cut from 0.010" sheet styrene cut a little bit wider than needed for the wing. The pieces where stacked slight offset towards the rear of the wing as each layer was added. Once assembled, shaping started at the leading edge rounding it over creating the foil shape as I went. The under side was sanded as smooth as possible to create the concave contour and putty filled in the seams that remained. The end result after cutting out the aileron is as follows:

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

Before moving on with assembly, I worked on adding a few details to the nacelle. I fabricated the intake vents from sheet stock scraps, built a platform for the pilot seat I borrowed from the spares box, and fabricated the seat for the observer.

[/IMG]

I then moved onward and completed the rest of the wing sections and the tail plane. I added the ribbing to the wing sections and tail plane by using 0.010" x 0.020" strip stock styrene layed across the part over the drawing for alignment and touching it with a brush of MEK. Once dry, I sanded the ribs to shape. I then added the wing root sections of the lower wing to the nacelle using 0.012" brass wire as pins. The joints were made with MEK, then ACC with activator and then faired in with white putty and sanded.

[/IMG]

I moved on to building a close approximation of the Beardmore engine. The top of the engine was all I needed to make and then mount to the platform at the back of the nacelle. I visited my spares box once again and found an engine part that came from a Roden Albatros kit, which always has extra parts. I removed the cylinders from the part and aligned them on the block I fabricated. I used a section from a paper clip for the propeller shaft and made sure it would be able to turn as it was mounted in the block. I then completed the engine with other engine detail parts from the spares box. I finished the engine by had carving the twin exhaust pipes which are actually too large to be accurate. After mounting the engine, I painted the assembly in order to make it easier to see everything.

[/IMG]
[/IMG]
[/IMG]

The rudder posed little problems other than my first one was too thin and needed to be at least 0.030" thick to allow for the brass wire hinge pin.

[/IMG]

I set my deadline for completing this model for April 2012, hence the serial number used on the rudder.

Next, the tail boom. The boom was made from brass wire. The vertical wires are all 0.012" brass wire while the horizontal wires are 0.063". Soldering was the only method that proved to be the most reliable in strength.

[/IMG]

Once I had added all the struts and rigging to the boom, the tail plane and rudder were added. The struts on the boom were made by laminating two halfs around the brass wire and then shaping in place. The rigging is all 2lb test fishing line. I have found this to be the best material to work with for me due to it's ease of use and durability in handling.

Once the rigging was completed, some painting was done and then the assembly was added to the fuselage assembly after dressing up the boom ends and using JB Weld to attach.

[/IMG]

Once the JB Weld cured, I took this shot:

[/IMG]

At this stage, the next thing to do was make struts and add the top center wing section. Each strut was made from strip stock cut from 0.020" sheet stock and scribed for the 0.012" brass wire core. The wings were drilled with a #80 drill for the brass pins and the rigging lines. Once the top center wing was added with JB Weld to the boom, the struts were slipped into place and then the assembly rigged.

[/IMG]

A few more details are then added to the fuselage and then the early style landing gear is assembled onto the underside using wire and strip styrene reinforced with wire.

[/IMG]

The wings are the only major assembly left to do and each strut needed to be made, added with the wings and rigged. The wings were added with brass pins as before.

[/IMG]

Decals, wing skids, guns, and tail skid are all that remain to be added now. The tail skid was I nice little puzzle to build, but after a few hours, I was able to complete the model.

[/IMG]

I managed to meet my deadline and was able to take it with me to a recent game convention. I am looking forward to my next scratch build project... the AGO C.I.

John
I've been fascinated by the FE2 since reading Derek Robinson's 'War Story', but wouldn't have the nerve to tackle even a mainline kit, much less consider the amazing feat of scratch-building one. Yours turned out beautifully; bravo!

Stuart
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