scale paint

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scale paint

Joined: March 27th, 2005, 9:30 am

April 7th, 2012, 10:45 pm #1

At one time I read about adding a certain ratio of white paint to a color based on the scale of the model. This was to compensate for colors looking darker the smaller the object. Is this still done, and if so what are the ratios?
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Joined: February 24th, 2002, 12:50 pm

April 7th, 2012, 10:59 pm #2

You've opened up a box of worms with this one.

Like preshading/postshading, panel line "washing," and some other "modern" techniques, you're going to hear from people on both sides--some will claim it's absolutely necessary, others will say it's an affectation and a waste of time and effort.

Personally, I don't bother with it unless I'm modeling an obviously sun-faded airplane.

Here's a good question: If you're doing this "scale effect" so as to simulate how the airplane looks through, say, 50 to 100 feet of atmosphere, then you're intending that it be viewed from a couple feet away, so why bother putting in tiny details that won't be seen at that distance?





Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
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Joined: March 19th, 2007, 9:06 am

April 7th, 2012, 11:03 pm #3

At one time I read about adding a certain ratio of white paint to a color based on the scale of the model. This was to compensate for colors looking darker the smaller the object. Is this still done, and if so what are the ratios?
There are ratios but I never use them, like most things in this hobby I just do what I think looks good to me. I'm not interested in getting into some arguement about scale effect but I personally prefer to lighten the paints I use, I just think it looks better. Also, with some colours white is NOT the best colour to lighten them with, add white to red and you get pink.

Read this if you're concerned about numbers.

http://www.cybermodeler.com/color/scale_effect.shtml


Last edited by Gluehuffer on April 7th, 2012, 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 25th, 2009, 12:54 am

April 7th, 2012, 11:10 pm #4

You've opened up a box of worms with this one.

Like preshading/postshading, panel line "washing," and some other "modern" techniques, you're going to hear from people on both sides--some will claim it's absolutely necessary, others will say it's an affectation and a waste of time and effort.

Personally, I don't bother with it unless I'm modeling an obviously sun-faded airplane.

Here's a good question: If you're doing this "scale effect" so as to simulate how the airplane looks through, say, 50 to 100 feet of atmosphere, then you're intending that it be viewed from a couple feet away, so why bother putting in tiny details that won't be seen at that distance?





Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
and a terrific point about scale, distance and detail, sir!

Later,

Lee
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Joined: November 14th, 2005, 7:39 pm

April 7th, 2012, 11:11 pm #5

At one time I read about adding a certain ratio of white paint to a color based on the scale of the model. This was to compensate for colors looking darker the smaller the object. Is this still done, and if so what are the ratios?
I always tone mt colors down a bit to what looks good to me. There are some colors that beg to be toned down for instance orange is one that comes to mind.In the end its what you like.

"Never run out of airspeed,altitude and ideas all at the same time" Pilots Creed
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Joined: March 2nd, 2005, 3:52 pm

April 7th, 2012, 11:49 pm #6

At one time I read about adding a certain ratio of white paint to a color based on the scale of the model. This was to compensate for colors looking darker the smaller the object. Is this still done, and if so what are the ratios?
What works for somebody doesn't work for somebody else. I don't generally add pure white, I add a very light grey. Remember, you're attempting to replicate the effect of atmospheric haze. Things tend to move toward grey at a distance (hence all the grey on grey on grey camouflage schemes). There are all kinds of published "formulas" all of which are just opinions. There is no magic to it. Add white or grey until it looks right to you, then it's right.
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Joined: February 8th, 2008, 6:54 pm

April 7th, 2012, 11:58 pm #7

At one time I read about adding a certain ratio of white paint to a color based on the scale of the model. This was to compensate for colors looking darker the smaller the object. Is this still done, and if so what are the ratios?
if it's dark grey. What I've started doing is using the origional color as a base coat, then going with the color lightened in random pattern over that. Some paint colors and some manufacturers need it more than others. Be flexible for the situation and historical context of the subject.
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Joined: August 9th, 2009, 2:56 pm

April 8th, 2012, 12:48 am #8

if you decide to tone down any color don't add white. That will make it paler but what you want to do is make it less intense. The way that is done is to add a little bit of whatever color is opposite it on the "color wheel". The color wheel is that rainbowy thingy that artists always refer to. Orange and blue are opposite of each other on the color wheel so if your Orange is too intense just add a drop of blue and likewise if your blue is to intense just add a drop of orange. What makes this method so great is that it doesn't change the color just its intensity. You can probably Google "Artists Color Wheel" and find a dozen in an instant and you can refer to them as to which color is opposite which. I have only rarely done this but it is quite effective.
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Joined: January 26th, 2011, 3:57 pm

April 8th, 2012, 12:53 am #9

At one time I read about adding a certain ratio of white paint to a color based on the scale of the model. This was to compensate for colors looking darker the smaller the object. Is this still done, and if so what are the ratios?
If you have ever looked at a painting of a landscape, you will notice that anything that is depicted at a distance is substantialy lighter than that which is closer. That's pretty much what scale lightness is about. The smaller the scale, the proportionaly lighter the colors should be. And it is quite subjective. It's pretty much trial and erroer until you find a shade that seems realistic to you.
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Joined: March 2nd, 2005, 3:52 pm

April 8th, 2012, 12:55 am #10

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