Re: Using Easy-Off Oven Cleaner as a paint remover...?

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Re: Using Easy-Off Oven Cleaner as a paint remover...?

Joined: May 4th, 2005, 6:32 pm

June 18th, 2017, 12:29 am #1

Got the spray can so, now, how do I use it (never having done it before)...? Do I spray it while on a plate and rinse it off immediately; do I give it time to soak and peel; do I fill a bowl and dip the parts? Recommendations for best practices to remove the paint while leaving the plastic uneaten...?

TIA, Steve
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Joined: December 26th, 2007, 10:27 pm

June 18th, 2017, 12:54 am #2

spray the oven cleaner into the bag coating all the parts, seal the bag, and let it sit over night. The next day, I rinse the parts in clean running water and scrub off any stubborn remaining paint with an old toothbrush. Wear rubber gloves, eye protection, and a respirator.
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 4:37 am

June 18th, 2017, 1:04 am #3

Got the spray can so, now, how do I use it (never having done it before)...? Do I spray it while on a plate and rinse it off immediately; do I give it time to soak and peel; do I fill a bowl and dip the parts? Recommendations for best practices to remove the paint while leaving the plastic uneaten...?

TIA, Steve
Just place the parts (or built model) you want to strip in the sink or in a plastic tub and spray the Easy-Off directly on. Let it sit for at least 30 minutes, then use an old toothbrush to scrub away the Easy Off/paint/decal slurry under running tap water. You may have to repeat or let it sit longer depending on the type and thickness of the paint you're removing.
The Easy-Off won't mar or eat into colored plastic parts but it may produce a "bleached" effect. I always remove clear parts before stripping just to be safe. You can mask off cockpits or other areas you want to protect with ordinary masking tape - as long as you have a good seal, Easy-Off won't soak through the tape.
Make sure you are working in a WELL ventilated area as Easy-Off fumes are intense. You may want to wear rubber cleaning gloves as it can chemically burn your skin.
That's about all there is to it. Simple, fast, cheap, and effective.
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Joined: December 15th, 2009, 1:19 am

June 18th, 2017, 1:31 am #4

One thing I do is to put a plug on the drain when I rinse off the model - just in case something falls off and could possibly go down the drain.

Can't underscore Bill's remarks about working in a well ventilated area - Easy-Off fumes are downright nasty! Wearing wrist length rubber gloves are a must, as well as using goggles and a respirator or mask.

I've been using Easy-Off to strip paint/decals off built-ups for years and has never once let me down. Give it extra time to work on heavier coats of paint before attempting to strip off the paint.
Last edited by mfe59 on June 18th, 2017, 4:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 24th, 2002, 12:50 pm

June 18th, 2017, 1:56 am #5

Just place the parts (or built model) you want to strip in the sink or in a plastic tub and spray the Easy-Off directly on. Let it sit for at least 30 minutes, then use an old toothbrush to scrub away the Easy Off/paint/decal slurry under running tap water. You may have to repeat or let it sit longer depending on the type and thickness of the paint you're removing.
The Easy-Off won't mar or eat into colored plastic parts but it may produce a "bleached" effect. I always remove clear parts before stripping just to be safe. You can mask off cockpits or other areas you want to protect with ordinary masking tape - as long as you have a good seal, Easy-Off won't soak through the tape.
Make sure you are working in a WELL ventilated area as Easy-Off fumes are intense. You may want to wear rubber cleaning gloves as it can chemically burn your skin.
That's about all there is to it. Simple, fast, cheap, and effective.
Except I don't find it necessary to wait 30 minutes. 15-20 is fine; it's gonna do what it's gonna do in that time. Rinse under warm running water while scrubbing with an old toothbrush, and repeat as necessary. It might take several treatments, but I've done three to five "doses" in an hour to an hour and a half.

I've found that letting the model "soak" in a sealed Tupperware thing for the 15-20 minutes cuts the fumage down to almost nothing.

Always wear eye protection when working with E-O. It's LYE, ferpissake, and will permanently damage your eyes.

If your FIRST treatment with E-O doesn't take ANY paint off, forget it and move on to something else. If your first treatment takes ANY paint off, no matter how little, stay with it--it WILL eventually take it ALL off, though it might take a half-dozen treatments or more.

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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 6:32 pm

June 18th, 2017, 3:38 pm #6

Got the spray can so, now, how do I use it (never having done it before)...? Do I spray it while on a plate and rinse it off immediately; do I give it time to soak and peel; do I fill a bowl and dip the parts? Recommendations for best practices to remove the paint while leaving the plastic uneaten...?

TIA, Steve
Needed to take the paint off of two wheel assemblies for Tamiya's 48th SdKfz 251 / rockets, and from the empennage of Tamiya's 48th He-219. All parts had been painted years ago, so the stuff was very "cured." Took a standard cereal bowl and dumped the parts therein, started loading up the bowl with EO. Had standard latex surgical gloves on, the thin kind, and they kept the chemicals off of me. Had the empennage in the bowl leading edge down, so I was able to fill the bowl with EO to the point that it completely covered the tail section. Did all of this outside on the seawall in Sausalito (no tourists yet) so it was just me and the seagulls waiting for the leftovers from Starbucks (breakfast while the EO did its juju / no fumes / no safety glasses). Doing some hand scrubbing to agitate and accelerate and then it occurred a stiff brush would facilitate so I went back upstairs for that. Scrubbed the crap out of everything and, within half an hour, had everything down to the plastic with no marring of the parts and no loosening of the glued joints which, after all, were chemically welded. Thanks again for the advice on different methods. Another weapon in the arsenal of conquering plastic... Cheers, Steve
Last edited by swluce on June 18th, 2017, 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 17th, 2008, 12:33 am

June 19th, 2017, 4:27 pm #7

I used to use oven cleaner, but didn't like dealing with the fumes (even with good ventilation), or wearing gloves, and most of all, with the one-shot use.

I saw a post on Agape Modelshttp://www.agapemodelersforum.com/) demonstrating using SuperClean to remove the chrome from Tamiya's chromed P-51D kit. SuperClean is an automotive de-greaser, and you can find it at Walmart and Autozone. At WalMart, it's about eight bucks a gallon. It's less caustic than oven cleaners, despite that both contain lye. But what's better is that you can use a batch of it over and over again.

I use glass jars of various sizes to soak pieces that I want to strip. I use SC to remove paint from styrene, resin or metal. It starts to work in minutes; after about 5, I can usually remove the softened paint with an old toothbrush. Of course, the longer the soak, the more the paint softens and dissolves into the solution. I used it to remove chrome, too, on the old Monogram Red Baron hot rod kit. The chrome dissolved in two minutes, leaving the sprues literally squeaky-clean, just the bare styrene.

I also use it in place of dishwashing liquid, just a couple of drops in warm water, to wash sprues or parts of mold release compounds.

Along with soaking parts, I can apply it with a brush to spot-clean areas without stripping an entire piece.

I also use it as a cleaner for my brushes and airbrush. I find that if I get build-up from paint in the ferrule of a brush, I can use SC to soak and dissolve the build-up. I'll also run a little through the airbrush, when using acrylics, or when I field-strip it for a full cleaning.

And SC can also be used around the house, to clean grease or oil stains or build-up. I even use it to unclog drains as necessary.

I still work with good ventilation, and I use cleaning gloves, but I've also just held pieces in my bare hand under running water while brushing the paint remnants away.

Best regards,
Brad
Last edited by MrNostalgia on June 19th, 2017, 4:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 6th, 2008, 2:49 pm

June 19th, 2017, 11:27 pm #8

Got the spray can so, now, how do I use it (never having done it before)...? Do I spray it while on a plate and rinse it off immediately; do I give it time to soak and peel; do I fill a bowl and dip the parts? Recommendations for best practices to remove the paint while leaving the plastic uneaten...?

TIA, Steve
Hi Folks;
I saw a post for Lysol spray. It comes in a yellow spray bottle and can be purchased at the grocer for less than $4.00. It does not have the bad odour easy off has and can be disposed down the sink. It is the best I have used for stripping a model and for cleaning my air brush and regular brushes. The absolute best product I have come across for the modeler.

Cheers

Al
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