Question re: History of the 1:48 Monogram TBD Devastator

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Question re: History of the 1:48 Monogram TBD Devastator

Joined: March 1st, 2005, 4:56 pm

May 30th, 2012, 7:16 pm #1

Hi folks,

I am currently working on the Monogram TBD Devastator and continue to be blown away by how nice it is given its age. I am building an original release and I think the copyright date on the box is 1973. I know by contemporary standards it may fall short with raised lines and poor fit at the wingroots but the accuracy amazes me. There is still not much out there on the TBD but this kit far surpasses the other Monogram efforts of the day like the Hellcat, Wildcat and Dauntless to name a few for which there was a lot more info available.

Someone in Morton Grove had a real affinity for this airplane. I was just wondering if anyone on this board knew anything about the history of the develpment of the kit. Thanks for any info and I certainly commend the kit to any who might be interested in the subject. The cockpit is quite accurate and complete and the accessory section detail is also good not to mention three superbly molded figures (also far better than those in the other 1:48 kits.)
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Joined: November 18th, 2011, 11:35 pm

May 30th, 2012, 7:24 pm #2

I recently finished one up and loved building it. Of course right as I started it the GW kit was announced but , as you said, there's not much to improve on over the ol' Monogram kit.

I'd built one before as a kid...slathered it with Testors Silver (from the small bottle!) and some Pactra Chrome Yellow!
Andrew White
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:27 am

May 30th, 2012, 7:31 pm #3

an eyeball doing the pattern vs someone who has no interest in the subject doing CAD drawings. Seriously, some subtle shapes just don't translate well to CAD.

this book may have some answers for you:


Paul

Current Project:
http://paulbudzik.com/current-projects/ ... ratch.html

http://www.shipmodels.info/mws_forum/vi ... 59&t=98433
Last edited by pbudzik on May 30th, 2012, 7:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 24th, 2002, 4:17 pm

May 30th, 2012, 7:37 pm #4

Hi folks,

I am currently working on the Monogram TBD Devastator and continue to be blown away by how nice it is given its age. I am building an original release and I think the copyright date on the box is 1973. I know by contemporary standards it may fall short with raised lines and poor fit at the wingroots but the accuracy amazes me. There is still not much out there on the TBD but this kit far surpasses the other Monogram efforts of the day like the Hellcat, Wildcat and Dauntless to name a few for which there was a lot more info available.

Someone in Morton Grove had a real affinity for this airplane. I was just wondering if anyone on this board knew anything about the history of the develpment of the kit. Thanks for any info and I certainly commend the kit to any who might be interested in the subject. The cockpit is quite accurate and complete and the accessory section detail is also good not to mention three superbly molded figures (also far better than those in the other 1:48 kits.)
The over sized hinge covers on the wing fold.

Oh yea, the masking of the canopy!



There is no such thing as an unbuildable kit, just some kits one may consider not worth building.

Ive realized that most people ... tend not to be direct when they feel something is shoddy because they want to be liked, "which is actually a vain trait".
[Walter Isaacson's (author of Steve Jobs) recounting of his interview with Jony Ive, Chief Designer at Apple @ page p. 461]



BUY THIS BOOK
http://tinyurl.com/Ididntseeitcoming
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

May 30th, 2012, 7:37 pm #5

Hi folks,

I am currently working on the Monogram TBD Devastator and continue to be blown away by how nice it is given its age. I am building an original release and I think the copyright date on the box is 1973. I know by contemporary standards it may fall short with raised lines and poor fit at the wingroots but the accuracy amazes me. There is still not much out there on the TBD but this kit far surpasses the other Monogram efforts of the day like the Hellcat, Wildcat and Dauntless to name a few for which there was a lot more info available.

Someone in Morton Grove had a real affinity for this airplane. I was just wondering if anyone on this board knew anything about the history of the develpment of the kit. Thanks for any info and I certainly commend the kit to any who might be interested in the subject. The cockpit is quite accurate and complete and the accessory section detail is also good not to mention three superbly molded figures (also far better than those in the other 1:48 kits.)
Or so since they came out with their old Wildcat and Hellcat, etc. The TBD was, for the early 70s, really state of the art as far as engineering, accuracy and detail went. Oddly there is no wheel well detail, which they were including in other kits (Black Widow, P-39) but thats about it as far as "issues". Given the limits of molding at the time, the kit was and still is quite good.
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Joined: September 4th, 2007, 12:26 am

May 30th, 2012, 7:43 pm #6

an eyeball doing the pattern vs someone who has no interest in the subject doing CAD drawings. Seriously, some subtle shapes just don't translate well to CAD.

this book may have some answers for you:


Paul

Current Project:
http://paulbudzik.com/current-projects/ ... ratch.html

http://www.shipmodels.info/mws_forum/vi ... 59&t=98433
.... but I don't recall it specifically mentioning the Devastator in any detail. I'll try and remember to look through the book tonight when I get home.

Jon Bius
www.agapemodels.com
Modeling with a Higher Purpose
Jon Bius
www.jonbius.com
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Joined: February 24th, 2002, 4:17 pm

May 30th, 2012, 7:44 pm #7

Or so since they came out with their old Wildcat and Hellcat, etc. The TBD was, for the early 70s, really state of the art as far as engineering, accuracy and detail went. Oddly there is no wheel well detail, which they were including in other kits (Black Widow, P-39) but thats about it as far as "issues". Given the limits of molding at the time, the kit was and still is quite good.


There is no such thing as an unbuildable kit, just some kits one may consider not worth building.

Ive realized that most people ... tend not to be direct when they feel something is shoddy because they want to be liked, "which is actually a vain trait".
[Walter Isaacson's (author of Steve Jobs) recounting of his interview with Jony Ive, Chief Designer at Apple @ page p. 461]



BUY THIS BOOK
http://tinyurl.com/Ididntseeitcoming
Last edited by modeldad on May 30th, 2012, 7:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 25th, 2012, 1:39 am

May 30th, 2012, 8:01 pm #8

Hi folks,

I am currently working on the Monogram TBD Devastator and continue to be blown away by how nice it is given its age. I am building an original release and I think the copyright date on the box is 1973. I know by contemporary standards it may fall short with raised lines and poor fit at the wingroots but the accuracy amazes me. There is still not much out there on the TBD but this kit far surpasses the other Monogram efforts of the day like the Hellcat, Wildcat and Dauntless to name a few for which there was a lot more info available.

Someone in Morton Grove had a real affinity for this airplane. I was just wondering if anyone on this board knew anything about the history of the develpment of the kit. Thanks for any info and I certainly commend the kit to any who might be interested in the subject. The cockpit is quite accurate and complete and the accessory section detail is also good not to mention three superbly molded figures (also far better than those in the other 1:48 kits.)
I've read somewhere that the earlier releases were designed to incorporate toylike features, to align them with the children's toy market: a toy you can build yourself. That's why the Zero, 109E, FW 190, Corsair, Wildcat, Hellcat, Helldiver, and Avenger have features like sliding canopies, retractable landing gear, folding wings, etc. The droppable bomb was my favorite: my SBD just laid waste to Fort Apache.

A change in strategy shifted the newer releases to the idea of a highly detailed, accurate, static model, and it seems contemporary scale modeling was born. This was in the early Seventies. Perhaps the company recognized its demographic was getting older, and desired more detailed models. In any event, the toylike features were dropped, and more authentic detailing was developed. If I recall, it was the P-51B or P-38 that came first, but I may be mistaken. The TBD, P-39, AT-6, and P-51D soon followed, and laid the groundwork for the twins and heavies. And probably triggered the epidemic of AMS.
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Joined: April 12th, 2012, 8:43 pm

May 30th, 2012, 8:25 pm #9

Sounds about right , not sure P-51D more like DO-335, P-61 and the Shep Paine guides also.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:27 am

May 30th, 2012, 8:32 pm #10

P-40B, no retracting gear just movable flaps and prop, then the P-38 came with the ability to do the various versions; Droopsnoot, F-5B etc. Both of these had very detailed cockpits for the day. These models were the first I had ever seen with decal stenciling and not a whole lot of moving parts from Monogram. They went on to give us the P-47, P-51B and the still very nice P-39 among others.
IIRC Monogram shut down 1/48 scale new stuff then in the early 70s started up again with the Do-335 and the TBD and things just took off, figuratively speaking.
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