PZL P.11c,111th Fighter Flight, Sept., 1938, Revell, W.I.P. (Almost Done)

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PZL P.11c,111th Fighter Flight, Sept., 1938, Revell, W.I.P. (Almost Done)

Joined: September 9th, 2004, 3:43 am

September 16th, 2011, 9:35 pm #1



This proved on examination to be a real treat of a kit. I remember when it first came out, though I was a bit past building model airplanes then. This is an English boxing. While there is some serious flash here and there, the moulding is excellent. In its travels down the years, the kit has shed its windscreen, but I expect I would replace that in any case. I am leaving the surface detail of this old kit intact, so far as I can manage, anyway; with the excellent corrugation, somehow the rivets and raised panel lines seem appropriate. I hope to be able to use the kit decals; they match pictures of a machine in a photograph of the 111th 'Kosciuszko' Flight taken in September, 1938, when Poland took advantage of the Munich settlement to help itself to a small slice of Czechoslovakia.



First was making an interior. It was also necessary to cut open the forward area (that the wind-screen sits over).





Here is the fuselage closed....



Note how the cowling, moulded to the fuselage, presents a solid blank to the rear. I set out to cut a lip into this, and so backed into the only major alteration I am making to the kit: in cutting in to make a lip, I found I pierced completely through in spots, so there was nothing for it but to keep going and separate the cowling (and motor assembly) completely....



Here is a shot with the cowling temporarily tacked on....



Here is the model with horizontal stabilizers and wing attached, and painted...





Paints are PollyScale, cut with Future: the pale blue is an RLM light blue, a powder blue shade, and the khaki is a mix of one part French Earth (a tan in which red does not predominate) and two parts British Dark Earth (which in the PollyScale line is a wholly inaccurate yellowish olive green). The corrugation is hit with a darker wash after a couple of base color coats (Azure Blue and an RLM dark brown), and then dry-brushed with the base color.

The final thing done was to replace an oval hatch under the nose that had been damaged cleaning the fuselage seam (with an oval cut from five thousandths card), and then to add the struts.



Here is bit of a look into the cockpit (the instruments are Mike Grant decals):



Into the home stretch with this one, Gentlemen....







A few points worth mentioning....

The propeller is one area that need modification for accuracy. The spinner is supposed to make a smooth cone with the front-plate; the kit piece leaves a distinct step. I added about a millimeter of plastic sheet at the rear of the spinner,trimmed the propeller blades off,and re-mounted them a little bit back of their original position.The spinner is just tacked in place for these pictures,it still needs a little more paint.

The kit's interface of wing struts and landing gear is a bit a tricky. The struts and legs are supposed to meet,and there is a sort of slot for this in the fuselage pieces. But the wing struts are a bit too long, and I just piled them in,pretty much filling the slots. The legs are but-jointed to where the struts meet the fuselage sides, which took a bit of trimming and custom fitting. The joints are weak,and the rigging (.25mm/.01" styrene rod) is functional; it keeps the legs from spreading under the weight of the model....

The wheels are over-engineered: the inner hubs/brake discs are on the legs, there is a doughnut for a tire,and then the hub-caps is added as a separate piece. The latter did not fit very well,and I made new little discs from thin sheet.

Having read many good things about using Future to snuggle down decals, I tried that method on this build; with all its corrugations, it should be an 'if it will do it here,it'll do it anywhere' sort of test....








Old as they were, the kit decals performed splendidly. I did take the precaution of leaving them to soak till they were floating off of their own accord.

I am very happy with the Future-as-setting-agent method. I brushed a bit on where the decal would go, pressed the decal when applied, then brushed a bit more over the decal. There was enough time for some fiddling when necessary. In a few places, I did have to burnish a little with a toothpick the next day, but only minor touching-up amounts of this were requited. I did a bit of wash-work, using a wash of a very reddish Italian brown camouflage color in the grooves of the red, and a wash of I.J.A. grey (a very pale slightly blueish grey) in the grooves of the white.

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Joined: November 4th, 2005, 4:54 am

September 16th, 2011, 11:31 pm #2

The darn landing gear would just sit there and slowly spead, it was awful....

Thanks for the idea, your model looks great by the way.

Greg in OK
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Joined: September 5th, 2009, 5:58 am

September 16th, 2011, 11:42 pm #3



This proved on examination to be a real treat of a kit. I remember when it first came out, though I was a bit past building model airplanes then. This is an English boxing. While there is some serious flash here and there, the moulding is excellent. In its travels down the years, the kit has shed its windscreen, but I expect I would replace that in any case. I am leaving the surface detail of this old kit intact, so far as I can manage, anyway; with the excellent corrugation, somehow the rivets and raised panel lines seem appropriate. I hope to be able to use the kit decals; they match pictures of a machine in a photograph of the 111th 'Kosciuszko' Flight taken in September, 1938, when Poland took advantage of the Munich settlement to help itself to a small slice of Czechoslovakia.



First was making an interior. It was also necessary to cut open the forward area (that the wind-screen sits over).





Here is the fuselage closed....



Note how the cowling, moulded to the fuselage, presents a solid blank to the rear. I set out to cut a lip into this, and so backed into the only major alteration I am making to the kit: in cutting in to make a lip, I found I pierced completely through in spots, so there was nothing for it but to keep going and separate the cowling (and motor assembly) completely....



Here is a shot with the cowling temporarily tacked on....



Here is the model with horizontal stabilizers and wing attached, and painted...





Paints are PollyScale, cut with Future: the pale blue is an RLM light blue, a powder blue shade, and the khaki is a mix of one part French Earth (a tan in which red does not predominate) and two parts British Dark Earth (which in the PollyScale line is a wholly inaccurate yellowish olive green). The corrugation is hit with a darker wash after a couple of base color coats (Azure Blue and an RLM dark brown), and then dry-brushed with the base color.

The final thing done was to replace an oval hatch under the nose that had been damaged cleaning the fuselage seam (with an oval cut from five thousandths card), and then to add the struts.



Here is bit of a look into the cockpit (the instruments are Mike Grant decals):



Into the home stretch with this one, Gentlemen....







A few points worth mentioning....

The propeller is one area that need modification for accuracy. The spinner is supposed to make a smooth cone with the front-plate; the kit piece leaves a distinct step. I added about a millimeter of plastic sheet at the rear of the spinner,trimmed the propeller blades off,and re-mounted them a little bit back of their original position.The spinner is just tacked in place for these pictures,it still needs a little more paint.

The kit's interface of wing struts and landing gear is a bit a tricky. The struts and legs are supposed to meet,and there is a sort of slot for this in the fuselage pieces. But the wing struts are a bit too long, and I just piled them in,pretty much filling the slots. The legs are but-jointed to where the struts meet the fuselage sides, which took a bit of trimming and custom fitting. The joints are weak,and the rigging (.25mm/.01" styrene rod) is functional; it keeps the legs from spreading under the weight of the model....

The wheels are over-engineered: the inner hubs/brake discs are on the legs, there is a doughnut for a tire,and then the hub-caps is added as a separate piece. The latter did not fit very well,and I made new little discs from thin sheet.

Having read many good things about using Future to snuggle down decals, I tried that method on this build; with all its corrugations, it should be an 'if it will do it here,it'll do it anywhere' sort of test....








Old as they were, the kit decals performed splendidly. I did take the precaution of leaving them to soak till they were floating off of their own accord.

I am very happy with the Future-as-setting-agent method. I brushed a bit on where the decal would go, pressed the decal when applied, then brushed a bit more over the decal. There was enough time for some fiddling when necessary. In a few places, I did have to burnish a little with a toothpick the next day, but only minor touching-up amounts of this were requited. I did a bit of wash-work, using a wash of a very reddish Italian brown camouflage color in the grooves of the red, and a wash of I.J.A. grey (a very pale slightly blueish grey) in the grooves of the white.
Great work, and I really like that scheme.

Cheers
Jim
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Joined: April 26th, 2006, 10:40 pm

September 16th, 2011, 11:49 pm #4



This proved on examination to be a real treat of a kit. I remember when it first came out, though I was a bit past building model airplanes then. This is an English boxing. While there is some serious flash here and there, the moulding is excellent. In its travels down the years, the kit has shed its windscreen, but I expect I would replace that in any case. I am leaving the surface detail of this old kit intact, so far as I can manage, anyway; with the excellent corrugation, somehow the rivets and raised panel lines seem appropriate. I hope to be able to use the kit decals; they match pictures of a machine in a photograph of the 111th 'Kosciuszko' Flight taken in September, 1938, when Poland took advantage of the Munich settlement to help itself to a small slice of Czechoslovakia.



First was making an interior. It was also necessary to cut open the forward area (that the wind-screen sits over).





Here is the fuselage closed....



Note how the cowling, moulded to the fuselage, presents a solid blank to the rear. I set out to cut a lip into this, and so backed into the only major alteration I am making to the kit: in cutting in to make a lip, I found I pierced completely through in spots, so there was nothing for it but to keep going and separate the cowling (and motor assembly) completely....



Here is a shot with the cowling temporarily tacked on....



Here is the model with horizontal stabilizers and wing attached, and painted...





Paints are PollyScale, cut with Future: the pale blue is an RLM light blue, a powder blue shade, and the khaki is a mix of one part French Earth (a tan in which red does not predominate) and two parts British Dark Earth (which in the PollyScale line is a wholly inaccurate yellowish olive green). The corrugation is hit with a darker wash after a couple of base color coats (Azure Blue and an RLM dark brown), and then dry-brushed with the base color.

The final thing done was to replace an oval hatch under the nose that had been damaged cleaning the fuselage seam (with an oval cut from five thousandths card), and then to add the struts.



Here is bit of a look into the cockpit (the instruments are Mike Grant decals):



Into the home stretch with this one, Gentlemen....







A few points worth mentioning....

The propeller is one area that need modification for accuracy. The spinner is supposed to make a smooth cone with the front-plate; the kit piece leaves a distinct step. I added about a millimeter of plastic sheet at the rear of the spinner,trimmed the propeller blades off,and re-mounted them a little bit back of their original position.The spinner is just tacked in place for these pictures,it still needs a little more paint.

The kit's interface of wing struts and landing gear is a bit a tricky. The struts and legs are supposed to meet,and there is a sort of slot for this in the fuselage pieces. But the wing struts are a bit too long, and I just piled them in,pretty much filling the slots. The legs are but-jointed to where the struts meet the fuselage sides, which took a bit of trimming and custom fitting. The joints are weak,and the rigging (.25mm/.01" styrene rod) is functional; it keeps the legs from spreading under the weight of the model....

The wheels are over-engineered: the inner hubs/brake discs are on the legs, there is a doughnut for a tire,and then the hub-caps is added as a separate piece. The latter did not fit very well,and I made new little discs from thin sheet.

Having read many good things about using Future to snuggle down decals, I tried that method on this build; with all its corrugations, it should be an 'if it will do it here,it'll do it anywhere' sort of test....








Old as they were, the kit decals performed splendidly. I did take the precaution of leaving them to soak till they were floating off of their own accord.

I am very happy with the Future-as-setting-agent method. I brushed a bit on where the decal would go, pressed the decal when applied, then brushed a bit more over the decal. There was enough time for some fiddling when necessary. In a few places, I did have to burnish a little with a toothpick the next day, but only minor touching-up amounts of this were requited. I did a bit of wash-work, using a wash of a very reddish Italian brown camouflage color in the grooves of the red, and a wash of I.J.A. grey (a very pale slightly blueish grey) in the grooves of the white.
I've just liberated that kit from evilbay myself and came to the same conclusion, great looking kit for such an old model. My surface detail will remain intact as well.

Thanks,
Allan

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

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Joined: July 8th, 2008, 10:57 am

September 17th, 2011, 1:09 am #5



This proved on examination to be a real treat of a kit. I remember when it first came out, though I was a bit past building model airplanes then. This is an English boxing. While there is some serious flash here and there, the moulding is excellent. In its travels down the years, the kit has shed its windscreen, but I expect I would replace that in any case. I am leaving the surface detail of this old kit intact, so far as I can manage, anyway; with the excellent corrugation, somehow the rivets and raised panel lines seem appropriate. I hope to be able to use the kit decals; they match pictures of a machine in a photograph of the 111th 'Kosciuszko' Flight taken in September, 1938, when Poland took advantage of the Munich settlement to help itself to a small slice of Czechoslovakia.



First was making an interior. It was also necessary to cut open the forward area (that the wind-screen sits over).





Here is the fuselage closed....



Note how the cowling, moulded to the fuselage, presents a solid blank to the rear. I set out to cut a lip into this, and so backed into the only major alteration I am making to the kit: in cutting in to make a lip, I found I pierced completely through in spots, so there was nothing for it but to keep going and separate the cowling (and motor assembly) completely....



Here is a shot with the cowling temporarily tacked on....



Here is the model with horizontal stabilizers and wing attached, and painted...





Paints are PollyScale, cut with Future: the pale blue is an RLM light blue, a powder blue shade, and the khaki is a mix of one part French Earth (a tan in which red does not predominate) and two parts British Dark Earth (which in the PollyScale line is a wholly inaccurate yellowish olive green). The corrugation is hit with a darker wash after a couple of base color coats (Azure Blue and an RLM dark brown), and then dry-brushed with the base color.

The final thing done was to replace an oval hatch under the nose that had been damaged cleaning the fuselage seam (with an oval cut from five thousandths card), and then to add the struts.



Here is bit of a look into the cockpit (the instruments are Mike Grant decals):



Into the home stretch with this one, Gentlemen....







A few points worth mentioning....

The propeller is one area that need modification for accuracy. The spinner is supposed to make a smooth cone with the front-plate; the kit piece leaves a distinct step. I added about a millimeter of plastic sheet at the rear of the spinner,trimmed the propeller blades off,and re-mounted them a little bit back of their original position.The spinner is just tacked in place for these pictures,it still needs a little more paint.

The kit's interface of wing struts and landing gear is a bit a tricky. The struts and legs are supposed to meet,and there is a sort of slot for this in the fuselage pieces. But the wing struts are a bit too long, and I just piled them in,pretty much filling the slots. The legs are but-jointed to where the struts meet the fuselage sides, which took a bit of trimming and custom fitting. The joints are weak,and the rigging (.25mm/.01" styrene rod) is functional; it keeps the legs from spreading under the weight of the model....

The wheels are over-engineered: the inner hubs/brake discs are on the legs, there is a doughnut for a tire,and then the hub-caps is added as a separate piece. The latter did not fit very well,and I made new little discs from thin sheet.

Having read many good things about using Future to snuggle down decals, I tried that method on this build; with all its corrugations, it should be an 'if it will do it here,it'll do it anywhere' sort of test....








Old as they were, the kit decals performed splendidly. I did take the precaution of leaving them to soak till they were floating off of their own accord.

I am very happy with the Future-as-setting-agent method. I brushed a bit on where the decal would go, pressed the decal when applied, then brushed a bit more over the decal. There was enough time for some fiddling when necessary. In a few places, I did have to burnish a little with a toothpick the next day, but only minor touching-up amounts of this were requited. I did a bit of wash-work, using a wash of a very reddish Italian brown camouflage color in the grooves of the red, and a wash of I.J.A. grey (a very pale slightly blueish grey) in the grooves of the white.
You really are quite the master of leeeetle tiny interiors! The PZL P.11 ranks very high on my "Coolest Planes of All Time" list, and your model is a beautiful representation.

Stuart
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Joined: December 24th, 2005, 1:07 pm

September 21st, 2011, 8:39 pm #6



This proved on examination to be a real treat of a kit. I remember when it first came out, though I was a bit past building model airplanes then. This is an English boxing. While there is some serious flash here and there, the moulding is excellent. In its travels down the years, the kit has shed its windscreen, but I expect I would replace that in any case. I am leaving the surface detail of this old kit intact, so far as I can manage, anyway; with the excellent corrugation, somehow the rivets and raised panel lines seem appropriate. I hope to be able to use the kit decals; they match pictures of a machine in a photograph of the 111th 'Kosciuszko' Flight taken in September, 1938, when Poland took advantage of the Munich settlement to help itself to a small slice of Czechoslovakia.



First was making an interior. It was also necessary to cut open the forward area (that the wind-screen sits over).





Here is the fuselage closed....



Note how the cowling, moulded to the fuselage, presents a solid blank to the rear. I set out to cut a lip into this, and so backed into the only major alteration I am making to the kit: in cutting in to make a lip, I found I pierced completely through in spots, so there was nothing for it but to keep going and separate the cowling (and motor assembly) completely....



Here is a shot with the cowling temporarily tacked on....



Here is the model with horizontal stabilizers and wing attached, and painted...





Paints are PollyScale, cut with Future: the pale blue is an RLM light blue, a powder blue shade, and the khaki is a mix of one part French Earth (a tan in which red does not predominate) and two parts British Dark Earth (which in the PollyScale line is a wholly inaccurate yellowish olive green). The corrugation is hit with a darker wash after a couple of base color coats (Azure Blue and an RLM dark brown), and then dry-brushed with the base color.

The final thing done was to replace an oval hatch under the nose that had been damaged cleaning the fuselage seam (with an oval cut from five thousandths card), and then to add the struts.



Here is bit of a look into the cockpit (the instruments are Mike Grant decals):



Into the home stretch with this one, Gentlemen....







A few points worth mentioning....

The propeller is one area that need modification for accuracy. The spinner is supposed to make a smooth cone with the front-plate; the kit piece leaves a distinct step. I added about a millimeter of plastic sheet at the rear of the spinner,trimmed the propeller blades off,and re-mounted them a little bit back of their original position.The spinner is just tacked in place for these pictures,it still needs a little more paint.

The kit's interface of wing struts and landing gear is a bit a tricky. The struts and legs are supposed to meet,and there is a sort of slot for this in the fuselage pieces. But the wing struts are a bit too long, and I just piled them in,pretty much filling the slots. The legs are but-jointed to where the struts meet the fuselage sides, which took a bit of trimming and custom fitting. The joints are weak,and the rigging (.25mm/.01" styrene rod) is functional; it keeps the legs from spreading under the weight of the model....

The wheels are over-engineered: the inner hubs/brake discs are on the legs, there is a doughnut for a tire,and then the hub-caps is added as a separate piece. The latter did not fit very well,and I made new little discs from thin sheet.

Having read many good things about using Future to snuggle down decals, I tried that method on this build; with all its corrugations, it should be an 'if it will do it here,it'll do it anywhere' sort of test....








Old as they were, the kit decals performed splendidly. I did take the precaution of leaving them to soak till they were floating off of their own accord.

I am very happy with the Future-as-setting-agent method. I brushed a bit on where the decal would go, pressed the decal when applied, then brushed a bit more over the decal. There was enough time for some fiddling when necessary. In a few places, I did have to burnish a little with a toothpick the next day, but only minor touching-up amounts of this were requited. I did a bit of wash-work, using a wash of a very reddish Italian brown camouflage color in the grooves of the red, and a wash of I.J.A. grey (a very pale slightly blueish grey) in the grooves of the white.
It's pleasant to see your work on these old unusual subjects - I like it very much

I build the Heller kit, it sounds like it is the easier one, when I rerad about the correction work involved with the prop - and the Heller kit also suffers spreading legs from the weight, though your solution is pretty elegant and accurate

Jolly good show Old Man - I enjoy it



* <i></i> * *
William De Coster / Belgium / past builds on HS : Plastic Stories

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