Perhaps helpful? Bf 109 gear alignment jig

.

Perhaps helpful? Bf 109 gear alignment jig

Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:27 am

June 22nd, 2018, 3:51 pm #1

Made from .015 sheet stock line up bottom latterly with strut mounting holes and top with centerline of axles, tape and instant alignment for rake and splay. Can be attached with white glue (dissolve with water to remove) or tape. Used here on a Hasegawa kit. IMG_8136 (2).JPG IMG_8139.JPG IMG_8138.JPG IMG_8152.JPG IMG_8153.JPG IMG_8154.JPG IMG_8147.JPG IMG_8145.JPG IMG_8144.JPG IMG_8137.JPG
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:52 am

June 22nd, 2018, 7:01 pm #2

What a great idea and much needed tool you have come up with there Pat. I guess I can pick mine up from you at Phoenix right? :)
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

June 22nd, 2018, 9:34 pm #3

I'd be a little afraid to use something like this. When I attach gear I park it on a rough surface, sandpaper if I must, and adjust it then maintain a watch on it until set. Sometimes I'll pull one strut out of its socket a bit or play with one's splay or rake to make sure the wings sit level with each other. Some of my gear may not be perfect but that's a lot less noticeable than an airplane that doesn't sit straight. I hope this works out for ya but something to consider.
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

June 26th, 2018, 11:53 pm #4

Been thinking about this, a guy could hold a straightedge across the wheels and eyeball it (or measure with a third hand) with the wings to check overall alignment that way, that would work.
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: December 28th, 2016, 6:50 pm

June 27th, 2018, 2:06 am #5

I think it’s a great idea... Spitfire’s next? As far as having level wing tips, I try to keep things level but if once things are together one wing tip’s a little higher than the other I don’t worry too much... figure a little pressure difference in oleos can cause the same thing on the real deal... but that’s just me...
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:27 am

June 27th, 2018, 3:29 am #6

Agreed, some small lateral differences are common; swinging the plane around on parking, someone walking out on a wing to re-arm or refuel, differential fuel loads, even a strong wind coming from one side can slightly offset the lateral wing tip distance from the ground. As stated different tire pressures or oleo pressures can have a large effect way out there on the wing tip. The F4F was notorious for leaning, check out the F4F in the foreground. Good idea to get them as close as you can but a small difference usually is not noticeable without measuring..IMO .   In 1/48 a 1/16" difference in wingtip height would work out to 3" full scale ground to wingtip difference across the wingspan.



grum739F4F-4BethpagePl1194243.jpg
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

June 27th, 2018, 4:45 pm #7

OK cool, I just wanted to point it out in case it's something you hadn't considered. I try to get mine level but if I have to make the gear look too bad to get there I'll find a happy medium too. Whatever jumps out at me less is the way I'll go.

With close gear like the '109 or Spit a slight difference at the wheels can become a lot at the wingtips.
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:27 am

June 27th, 2018, 5:08 pm #8

Absolutely correct!  Totally agree, with the limitations of plastic sometimes it is just not possible to get everything just so. I think as you, so sometimes we just have to accept the Wabi-sabi of a situation. 
 A .005 shim inboard at the gear mount can make a big difference way out there on the wingtip as you have pointed out. Having said THAT if I brought a F4F with that type of lean to a contest I would be sure to have a photo....😉
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