Overdone weathering ...

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Joined: September 4th, 2005, 11:06 pm

June 12th, 2018, 1:55 pm #11

The major problem to me is how to reproduce every drop of oil and streak of grease in any scale... this is the real problem. No problem to see a "overweathered" model, but some times they look like toys or not represent the reality... IMHO
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Joined: December 7th, 2009, 12:13 pm

June 12th, 2018, 3:01 pm #12

A P-51D & a F-86E pilot told me that during WW-II and the Korean Conflict, that most times they kept the airplane in working order and very seldom cleaned them, except when "VIP's" from America came to the front lines with photographer's.

Take note of the right landing gear on the Spitfire as it is not retracted 100% into the wheel well.

RJW
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 2:46 pm

June 12th, 2018, 4:16 pm #13

I would suggest that basing your degree of weathering on extremely over processed, highly posterized images does very little to support your argument.  I don't disagree that military hardware can get pretty beat-up, but web images like this have been so destroyed as to lack all subtlety.



Paul
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Joined: November 15th, 2005, 7:52 pm

June 12th, 2018, 7:09 pm #14

NT.
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 11:57 pm

June 12th, 2018, 11:05 pm #15

P_Budzik wrote: I would suggest that basing your degree of weathering on extremely over processed, highly posterized images does very little to support your argument.  I don't disagree that military hardware can get pretty beat-up, but web images like this have been so destroyed as to lack all subtlety.



Paul
I agree the contrast is bumped way up in some of those photos...but they still provide useful information as long as that fact is kept in mind.
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

June 13th, 2018, 1:33 am #16

owlman2 wrote:


If you want to build them dirty, there is ample photographic evidence....at least of WWII aircraft....to back up your desires.

When the pundits say "it's overweathered....", what they really mean, deep down is:  "I prefer to build my models cleaner than that, and by doing it differently, you are failing to validate my choices and directly threatening my sense of self worth.  Stop it immediately."

LOL
I rarely, probably almost never, see comments on models stating it's overweathered. General comments elsewhere within discussions yes but rarely comments on specific models.

"Too clean" I see much more often, as direct comments on specific models.
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: August 20th, 2010, 11:34 am

June 13th, 2018, 4:44 am #17

MDriskill wrote: But, you will notice that not even these impressively filthy machines have a neatly-applied streak of slime which uniformly follows every single panel line on the airframe. That’s the current model finishing fad that makes me think “overweathered.”
Hear hear!! If a pilot approached his plane with panel lines as dirty as some models show them he would sack his erks and get his plane cleaned properly! If you want prominent panel lines on your models , go and buy Corgi toys! Just my opinion, don't intend to be rude, as we are all individuals according to Brian.
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

June 13th, 2018, 7:15 pm #18

Paul uses the word dominating in his video, and that's been exactly what I've tried to convey. At some point during the weathering process it reaches a point at which the weathering will dominate the model, meaning, it's the first thing you'll notice when laying your eyes on the model for the very first time. If that's what you want by all means go for it but after that point the subject it's applied to becomes secondary, that meaning, whether it's a B-25 or Spitfire takes a back seat to the weathering we'll be looking through to see it.

Personally, I see it as a distraction, once it reaches the point where it stops adding o the overall look and starts taking from it. I've seen some beautiful, masterful work done this way but I wouldn't want it on my own personal shelves at home. This is personally speaking, of course, my own opinion but it is a fact (I believe) that that point in the weathering process does exist. The point where we have to make this decision of what the real focus will become, the subject itself or the weathering applied to it. It's like the sound barrier. :)
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: December 7th, 2009, 12:13 pm

June 13th, 2018, 8:35 pm #19

Hi Again: 

I went back and looked at a lot of my WW-II Scrapbook photos and most of them show color fading which is awesome, however the airplanes do not seem to be very dirty like the enclose posted B-25 photo.  I estimate that I attended over 200 contest from 1984 to 2016 and I was a judge at all of them.  I would say that 95% of the models were "factory-fresh." 

I have saved all of my IPMS/USA Journal magazines since 2006 and ever year one issue is devoted to their annual contest which shows all the models that were entered, plus all the winners. It seems like there is not much weathering on very many models.

Remember, It's not how much stuff you put on/in a model, it is how well it's done. You can overdo the weathering like anything else. 

I build airliners, air racers, armor, cars, dino's, ships, submarines, motor cycles, and of course many WW-II Nazi, Jap, Brit and American planes in many scales and to say the least, my weathering is bare minimum.

And remember again that the model is yours, so you build it to your requirement's, and if other modeler's don't like it......well it's too bad for them as it's your "Pride and Joy!"

RJW
IPMS #21286-1984-present.
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 11:57 pm

June 13th, 2018, 10:23 pm #20

stilltubeglue wrote: Paul uses the word dominating in his video, and that's been exactly what I've tried to convey. At some point during the weathering process it reaches a point at which the weathering will dominate the model, meaning, it's the first thing you'll notice when laying your eyes on the model for the very first time. If that's what you want by all means go for it but after that point the subject it's applied to becomes secondary, that meaning, whether it's a B-25 or Spitfire takes a back seat to the weathering we'll be looking through to see it.

Personally, I see it as a distraction, once it reaches the point where it stops adding o the overall look and starts taking from it. I've seen some beautiful, masterful work done this way but I wouldn't want it on my own personal shelves at home. This is personally speaking, of course, my own opinion but it is a fact (I believe) that that point in the weathering process does exist. The point where we have to make this decision of what the real focus will become, the subject itself or the weathering applied to it. It's like the sound barrier. :)
Very well said....and I agree to a point.

But what I would hate to see the most is if everyone starts building the same.  For example, SO many armor models I see these days look like they were built by Michael Rinaldi.  I mean, Rinaldi is awesome, but I would rather see different approaches.  So I like the fact that we disagree, or the hobby would be boring. 

I went through a phase a while back building unlimited air racers.  They have zero weathering.  Zero.  What really bothered me, after building Fisher's model of the RB-51....was that every build I saw of that kit, every one, looked exactly like mine.  Indistinguishable.  I hated that.  So the "weathering" issue allows us a lot of leeway to personalize builds and make them our own.  That's what I really like about it, even if we don't always agree, actually especially because we don't always agree.
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