Need an opinion on tyres for my car......

Need an opinion on tyres for my car......

Joined: January 27th, 2004, 1:10 am

July 4th, 2012, 4:24 pm #1

Took my wife along the 401, to see a specialist dentist. Then came a 'situation' where it was better for my small car, (Toyota Echo) to accelerate into a clearer area of the highway.

At 120 KPH, noticed that there was vibration on steering wheel, and since I had just had my summer tyres installed, thought they needed re-balancing.

Went back to the dealer, explained the problem and they said they would check it out. The car is seven years old, and has only 54,000 kilometres on it. They did a road test, and confirmed that there was a slight vibration, which I was told was due to the fact that the REAR tyres were down on the outer tread, greater than the front.

Their advice was to keep the tyres on until next spring, when having changed from snow to all-season, I should buy a pair of new Michelins for the front, and put the less worn fronts on the rear. Seems logical.

However, I am wondering whether the Michelins are worth the extra expense, given that the vast majority of my driving is in the city. Can I mix-and-match this way? And what would be a good substitute?
Thanks for any advice.

Cheers,

Derek
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Joined: June 11th, 2005, 3:19 pm

July 4th, 2012, 8:26 pm #2

They're GREAT tires. Rotate and balance them properly and keep the car aligned and they'll last their mileage (kilometerage?) ratings, and beyond.

I like Michelins, Firestones and Goodyear (except the cheaper eagle series)... I've found all three to take the abuse of 75 mile per day driving to beyond their ratings (and I SELDOM rotate them as they should be).

Of all the things, your life depends on those tires, your steering system and brakes the most. Don't skimp if you can afford not to.

Last edited by seafirexv on July 4th, 2012, 8:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 27th, 2004, 10:53 pm

July 4th, 2012, 8:33 pm #3

Took my wife along the 401, to see a specialist dentist. Then came a 'situation' where it was better for my small car, (Toyota Echo) to accelerate into a clearer area of the highway.

At 120 KPH, noticed that there was vibration on steering wheel, and since I had just had my summer tyres installed, thought they needed re-balancing.

Went back to the dealer, explained the problem and they said they would check it out. The car is seven years old, and has only 54,000 kilometres on it. They did a road test, and confirmed that there was a slight vibration, which I was told was due to the fact that the REAR tyres were down on the outer tread, greater than the front.

Their advice was to keep the tyres on until next spring, when having changed from snow to all-season, I should buy a pair of new Michelins for the front, and put the less worn fronts on the rear. Seems logical.

However, I am wondering whether the Michelins are worth the extra expense, given that the vast majority of my driving is in the city. Can I mix-and-match this way? And what would be a good substitute?
Thanks for any advice.

Cheers,

Derek
...their goal is to sell you something if at all possible.
Your first instinct sounds more logical.
Something's out of balance and treadwear doesn't sound logical.

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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 1:18 pm

July 4th, 2012, 9:23 pm #4

Took my wife along the 401, to see a specialist dentist. Then came a 'situation' where it was better for my small car, (Toyota Echo) to accelerate into a clearer area of the highway.

At 120 KPH, noticed that there was vibration on steering wheel, and since I had just had my summer tyres installed, thought they needed re-balancing.

Went back to the dealer, explained the problem and they said they would check it out. The car is seven years old, and has only 54,000 kilometres on it. They did a road test, and confirmed that there was a slight vibration, which I was told was due to the fact that the REAR tyres were down on the outer tread, greater than the front.

Their advice was to keep the tyres on until next spring, when having changed from snow to all-season, I should buy a pair of new Michelins for the front, and put the less worn fronts on the rear. Seems logical.

However, I am wondering whether the Michelins are worth the extra expense, given that the vast majority of my driving is in the city. Can I mix-and-match this way? And what would be a good substitute?
Thanks for any advice.

Cheers,

Derek
Mich mud/snows on my SUV. Swear by those! BUT, there are dozs of types/lines of tires within each brand, some crap, some great. I drive ruff offroad and fast road 10-15% of the time but the other 90% is under 40-50 mph on pavement, putt putting to/from and around town.

For your type of 99% driving, go to 2-3 indy/chain tire dealers, tell them your story/needs, think about all three replies/sales pitches overnite and go back and buy from the one. Check those in person tire quotes against online prices too, just for added info, tho for reg type street tires I don't recommend going that route. Also have them all look at those 'badly worn' rears. They may not be too bad afterall and it was all just a sales pitch. For your reg around town street driving needs, you should be able to find tires for under $100 each. Prob way under.

Uneven tread wear can cause the vibration but it'd have to be extreme/odd wear. And too, the bigger problem, WHAT caused that extreme uneven wear in the first place?! Bad tire, suspension alignment, bearings, etc?

Since you just switched tires, I'd check bal/weights first. Also cuz it's the cheapest/easiest poss 'fix'. Lug nuts tight? Could be suspension/steering problems too.

Don't shy away from tire names you may not have heard of before. Toyo (Jpn) and Hankook (Kor) come to mind. They make good tires too.

Last edited by bookmark460 on July 4th, 2012, 9:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 27th, 2004, 1:10 am

July 4th, 2012, 10:15 pm #5

They're GREAT tires. Rotate and balance them properly and keep the car aligned and they'll last their mileage (kilometerage?) ratings, and beyond.

I like Michelins, Firestones and Goodyear (except the cheaper eagle series)... I've found all three to take the abuse of 75 mile per day driving to beyond their ratings (and I SELDOM rotate them as they should be).

Of all the things, your life depends on those tires, your steering system and brakes the most. Don't skimp if you can afford not to.
best tyres on the rear. Reason for this is to prevent hydroplaning in rain, which worn tyres on the rear would promote.

Also, like most cities, the roads in Toronto are in bad condition, lots of 'utility cuts'. Wondering if I should get a wheel alignment.

Cheers,

Derek
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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 1:18 pm

July 4th, 2012, 10:32 pm #6

say in a blow out, less so.
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Joined: May 2nd, 2005, 10:49 pm

July 4th, 2012, 11:18 pm #7

best tyres on the rear. Reason for this is to prevent hydroplaning in rain, which worn tyres on the rear would promote.

Also, like most cities, the roads in Toronto are in bad condition, lots of 'utility cuts'. Wondering if I should get a wheel alignment.

Cheers,

Derek
n/m
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 1:34 pm

July 5th, 2012, 10:11 am #8

Took my wife along the 401, to see a specialist dentist. Then came a 'situation' where it was better for my small car, (Toyota Echo) to accelerate into a clearer area of the highway.

At 120 KPH, noticed that there was vibration on steering wheel, and since I had just had my summer tyres installed, thought they needed re-balancing.

Went back to the dealer, explained the problem and they said they would check it out. The car is seven years old, and has only 54,000 kilometres on it. They did a road test, and confirmed that there was a slight vibration, which I was told was due to the fact that the REAR tyres were down on the outer tread, greater than the front.

Their advice was to keep the tyres on until next spring, when having changed from snow to all-season, I should buy a pair of new Michelins for the front, and put the less worn fronts on the rear. Seems logical.

However, I am wondering whether the Michelins are worth the extra expense, given that the vast majority of my driving is in the city. Can I mix-and-match this way? And what would be a good substitute?
Thanks for any advice.

Cheers,

Derek
Drive through a Chicago winter and hit alot of potholes and I guarantee I slightly bent a rim out of balance.

I would take the car to a place that can do a road balance which means they check the tires at speed to ensure they are balanced in a driving situation...

Cheers,

Max Bryant

"You'll Love My Wingnuts!"
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Joined: March 10th, 2005, 5:37 pm

July 5th, 2012, 4:33 pm #9

don't come 'a knockin'" ?
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