need advice on weathering jets - asking for trouble

.

need advice on weathering jets - asking for trouble

Joined: June 30th, 2008, 1:18 am

April 15th, 2012, 12:39 am #1

I want to get back into building 1/48 jets and I would like to know the best weathering process (counter shading, high lighitng panel lines asdie form a black pencil).

I realize there are a number of methods out there to achieve this goal but I am looking for a basic style that will render a decent look . . . what say you all?
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Joined: February 14th, 2006, 4:50 pm

April 15th, 2012, 1:25 am #2



Con-firmed! It's a cruel world, Herr Hauptman. You said so yourself.
--Bruno Stachel
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Joined: June 30th, 2008, 1:18 am

April 15th, 2012, 1:30 am #3

I do not want to get into definitions and opinions,,,just need some guidance . . . what do you do to weather your model aircraft . . . please.

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Joined: February 18th, 2006, 2:30 pm

April 15th, 2012, 1:42 am #4

I want to get back into building 1/48 jets and I would like to know the best weathering process (counter shading, high lighitng panel lines asdie form a black pencil).

I realize there are a number of methods out there to achieve this goal but I am looking for a basic style that will render a decent look . . . what say you all?
Pre-shading panel lines helps break up a monotonous tone. Overspray with finish color not worrying about uniformity of the pre-shade, sometimes the dept of non contiguous panel shading looks more convincing than perfectly applied and "obvious" panel pre-shading.
After a coat of future applied to a model, use thinned enamel or other for panel line wash by brush application, wipe with cloth or cotton. Depending on desired results, you can "wipe" off as much as you want or less or redo over. imperfect weathering can come across 1-1 realistic in most cases, something to consider.

Just my perspective and personal taste and simplistic for the supplies and time at my disposal. hope this helps..

Last edited by alexlopez on April 15th, 2012, 1:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 21st, 2005, 2:28 pm

April 15th, 2012, 2:57 am #5

I do not want to get into definitions and opinions,,,just need some guidance . . . what do you do to weather your model aircraft . . . please.
Paul, i usually confine my weathering to wash of the panel lines, some dark gray graphite streaks coming off the control surface hinges, and on the belly, streaks of oil coming from the breathers, maybe a little excess hydraulic fluid streaking away from the filler port locations.

That would be a good, conservative point to start from.

HTH,

david
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:27 am

April 15th, 2012, 3:24 am #6

Pre-shading panel lines helps break up a monotonous tone. Overspray with finish color not worrying about uniformity of the pre-shade, sometimes the dept of non contiguous panel shading looks more convincing than perfectly applied and "obvious" panel pre-shading.
After a coat of future applied to a model, use thinned enamel or other for panel line wash by brush application, wipe with cloth or cotton. Depending on desired results, you can "wipe" off as much as you want or less or redo over. imperfect weathering can come across 1-1 realistic in most cases, something to consider.

Just my perspective and personal taste and simplistic for the supplies and time at my disposal. hope this helps..
weathering. Profiles and photos of other models don't necessarily make good reference, tips and ideas perhaps but try to reference the real thing.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 1:11 pm

April 15th, 2012, 3:53 am #7

I want to get back into building 1/48 jets and I would like to know the best weathering process (counter shading, high lighitng panel lines asdie form a black pencil).

I realize there are a number of methods out there to achieve this goal but I am looking for a basic style that will render a decent look . . . what say you all?
Scale effect is all important to me, and the most vital step in weathering any model. Getting a light pastel off-white dusting of pigments on the model is key. The theory is partially bound up in the lightening, "graying" if you will, of the colors, so they aren't so bright. My technique is to paint the models in standard colors, then place them on open shelves. Once in a while I move them, and slightly disturb the magic that's taking place, but that helps introduce a little randomness to the overall effect. Once in a VERY rare while, I hold a model under the faucet in the kitchen, which tightens up the weathering that's taking place and helps bind the medium into panel lines and even Trumpeter rivets rather well. What's remarkable about my method, though, is that is works entirely the same with older, raised panel line models! The accentuation that happens by time and nature causes all sorts of incredible artfulness!


____________________________________________________________________________________

"The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them."
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<font size="2" color="#808080">Mark Twain<font>

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http://hyperscale.com/approachtonoderatingbg_1.htm
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Last edited by rwholcomb on April 15th, 2012, 3:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 19th, 2007, 9:06 am

April 15th, 2012, 11:14 am #8

I want to get back into building 1/48 jets and I would like to know the best weathering process (counter shading, high lighitng panel lines asdie form a black pencil).

I realize there are a number of methods out there to achieve this goal but I am looking for a basic style that will render a decent look . . . what say you all?
If by decent you mean basic.

If I just want to break up the monotenous toylike appearance of straight colours I usually just randomly vary the shade of the colours, not the uniform quiltlike pattern you see with most pre or post shading(unless you have photo evidence that's what it should look like). After that a subtle wash to highlight details(don't use black!) and perhaps some filters.

The next step is to progress to adding exhaust stains, steaks and other dirt and wear but that I would consider to be beyond basic.
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Joined: December 29th, 2002, 11:19 am

April 15th, 2012, 11:47 am #9

Scale effect is all important to me, and the most vital step in weathering any model. Getting a light pastel off-white dusting of pigments on the model is key. The theory is partially bound up in the lightening, "graying" if you will, of the colors, so they aren't so bright. My technique is to paint the models in standard colors, then place them on open shelves. Once in a while I move them, and slightly disturb the magic that's taking place, but that helps introduce a little randomness to the overall effect. Once in a VERY rare while, I hold a model under the faucet in the kitchen, which tightens up the weathering that's taking place and helps bind the medium into panel lines and even Trumpeter rivets rather well. What's remarkable about my method, though, is that is works entirely the same with older, raised panel line models! The accentuation that happens by time and nature causes all sorts of incredible artfulness!


____________________________________________________________________________________

"The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them."
<font>

<font size="2" color="#808080">Mark Twain<font>

<font size="2" color="#808080">____________________________________________________________________________________

http://hyperscale.com/approachtonoderatingbg_1.htm
</font></font></font></font>
more suited to WWII types, though- I've been working on training spiders to do antenna wires. Once they're getting good at that I'm hoping to move on to rigging of biplanes.

bob
"Ignorance is bliss, but I find learning more interesting." - Me, as far as I know
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Joined: March 10th, 2005, 11:29 pm

April 15th, 2012, 1:41 pm #10

I want to get back into building 1/48 jets and I would like to know the best weathering process (counter shading, high lighitng panel lines asdie form a black pencil).

I realize there are a number of methods out there to achieve this goal but I am looking for a basic style that will render a decent look . . . what say you all?
Less is more IMHO. N/T
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