Need advice for debonding solvent glue joints

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Need advice for debonding solvent glue joints

Joined: January 10th, 2006, 4:30 pm

May 18th, 2012, 9:13 pm #1

Does anyone have a good method for "ungluing" solvent based glue joints? I am attempting to restore some old kits and particularly need to seperate the fuselage halves so that the cockpits and interiors can be repainted. Seams were glued with Testors liquid cement or MEK allowing capilary action to join the entire length. Any advice would be appreciated.
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Joined: March 2nd, 2005, 3:52 pm

May 18th, 2012, 9:29 pm #2

Those types of glue melt the plastic, fusing the two halves together. Unless you can carefully apply pressure to break the joint, the only other option is to cut/saw/slice. It's not like there's plastic > plastic. It's just plastic >>
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Joined: April 18th, 2012, 8:53 pm

May 18th, 2012, 9:39 pm #3

Does anyone have a good method for "ungluing" solvent based glue joints? I am attempting to restore some old kits and particularly need to seperate the fuselage halves so that the cockpits and interiors can be repainted. Seams were glued with Testors liquid cement or MEK allowing capilary action to join the entire length. Any advice would be appreciated.
... is what you will need. Per the prior post you will need to "cut" the joint. I used a #19 blade at the cockpit area to start the cut. Work your blade into the seam and slowly make the cut. With a sharp blade it will be easy - change the blade to a new one when you get resistance. You need to be careful and take your time as you "slice the halves apart. Good luck.
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Joined: November 8th, 2006, 11:28 pm

May 18th, 2012, 9:54 pm #4

Does anyone have a good method for "ungluing" solvent based glue joints? I am attempting to restore some old kits and particularly need to seperate the fuselage halves so that the cockpits and interiors can be repainted. Seams were glued with Testors liquid cement or MEK allowing capilary action to join the entire length. Any advice would be appreciated.
When I need to debond assemblies which I have glued with the old Testor's tube and liquid glues I run a bit of superglue accelerator along the seem. After letting sit a while, I then carefully use a knife blade to split the seam. The accelerator weakens the bond making it easier to separate parts. This works pretty well for me.

HTH

Doug
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Joined: April 20th, 2008, 5:22 am

May 18th, 2012, 10:18 pm #5

Does anyone have a good method for "ungluing" solvent based glue joints? I am attempting to restore some old kits and particularly need to seperate the fuselage halves so that the cockpits and interiors can be repainted. Seams were glued with Testors liquid cement or MEK allowing capilary action to join the entire length. Any advice would be appreciated.
Put the parts in the freezer for a couple of hours and them carefully pry the parts apart.The low temps seem to make the glue brittle.
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Joined: December 29th, 2005, 4:15 am

May 19th, 2012, 12:20 am #6

Does anyone have a good method for "ungluing" solvent based glue joints? I am attempting to restore some old kits and particularly need to seperate the fuselage halves so that the cockpits and interiors can be repainted. Seams were glued with Testors liquid cement or MEK allowing capilary action to join the entire length. Any advice would be appreciated.
I am nowhere near an expert on such matters; however, I recently got a 'mostly' built kit from a friend who didn't want to finish it. I'm not sure what adhesive he used, but I'm almost certain it was a liquid similar to the Testors or Tamiya items.

In any case, I applied some Tamiya Extra Thin liquid cement with its brush applicator along the join lines, and was able to 'disassemble' the items in the bomb bay, a gun turret assembly, the engine nacelles/cowling joins, the rudders/elevators assembly to fuselage join, and some other joints. I did insert a #11 blade into some of the softened joins and applied a little twisting effort, and repeated the glue application occasionally, but it mostly did a good job of getting the parts 'apart'. Granted, the kit wasn't years old, only being assembled a few weeks before I got it. If your project is not extremely valuable, it may be worth a shot.

An old soldier, but not faded away. Yet.
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