Naval aviation news from 1970:

.

Naval aviation news from 1970:

Joined: November 10th, 2006, 3:04 pm

August 6th, 2012, 11:19 pm #1

http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backiss ... /dec70.pdf

Came across this on another website, and found it interesting. There are plenty of great stories, like the development of the NEW, soon to be going in to service, f-14a, A great read on the USS Langley, some interesting stories on aircraft losses, and how they could have been avoided (along with now expressly verbotten critiques of who/what went wrong. A great story about an officer who had just logged 3k hours in Buckeyes (yes, they were that old), and a blurb about the new, twin engine AH-1j that the USMC was about to buy for testing. Sorry, Bondo, it's ALL Navy, and nuthin BUT Navy.

Years ago, such small, indie mags and newsletters like this were common. LOTS of folks were more than happy to jot down a quick story or blurb. I recall finding a box full of newlstters from my dad's work. MILK TRUCK drivers had a newsletter! Our local IPMS used to have not only a monthly newsletter, but a quarterly magazine, and the rule was, in one or the other, but NOT both, and we never had problems getting folks to write. Anyhow, sit back, pop open a beverage, and enjoy the above!




"Bruce Springsteen? I LOVE him! He's like the American version of Bryan Adams!"

_Robin Sherbotsky
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:24 pm

August 7th, 2012, 12:51 am #2

And what happened to the flying platform on page 26?
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Joined: May 10th, 2005, 10:47 pm

August 7th, 2012, 12:56 am #3

http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backiss ... /dec70.pdf

Came across this on another website, and found it interesting. There are plenty of great stories, like the development of the NEW, soon to be going in to service, f-14a, A great read on the USS Langley, some interesting stories on aircraft losses, and how they could have been avoided (along with now expressly verbotten critiques of who/what went wrong. A great story about an officer who had just logged 3k hours in Buckeyes (yes, they were that old), and a blurb about the new, twin engine AH-1j that the USMC was about to buy for testing. Sorry, Bondo, it's ALL Navy, and nuthin BUT Navy.

Years ago, such small, indie mags and newsletters like this were common. LOTS of folks were more than happy to jot down a quick story or blurb. I recall finding a box full of newlstters from my dad's work. MILK TRUCK drivers had a newsletter! Our local IPMS used to have not only a monthly newsletter, but a quarterly magazine, and the rule was, in one or the other, but NOT both, and we never had problems getting folks to write. Anyhow, sit back, pop open a beverage, and enjoy the above!




"Bruce Springsteen? I LOVE him! He's like the American version of Bryan Adams!"

_Robin Sherbotsky
There's more than 60 years of issues available on line:

http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backiss ... issues.htm
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:15 am

August 7th, 2012, 1:11 am #4

http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backiss ... /dec70.pdf

Came across this on another website, and found it interesting. There are plenty of great stories, like the development of the NEW, soon to be going in to service, f-14a, A great read on the USS Langley, some interesting stories on aircraft losses, and how they could have been avoided (along with now expressly verbotten critiques of who/what went wrong. A great story about an officer who had just logged 3k hours in Buckeyes (yes, they were that old), and a blurb about the new, twin engine AH-1j that the USMC was about to buy for testing. Sorry, Bondo, it's ALL Navy, and nuthin BUT Navy.

Years ago, such small, indie mags and newsletters like this were common. LOTS of folks were more than happy to jot down a quick story or blurb. I recall finding a box full of newlstters from my dad's work. MILK TRUCK drivers had a newsletter! Our local IPMS used to have not only a monthly newsletter, but a quarterly magazine, and the rule was, in one or the other, but NOT both, and we never had problems getting folks to write. Anyhow, sit back, pop open a beverage, and enjoy the above!




"Bruce Springsteen? I LOVE him! He's like the American version of Bryan Adams!"

_Robin Sherbotsky
I remember reading these in my HS library from 77-81.
I even have a few issues....
chip
Naples, FL
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Joined: February 26th, 2005, 11:31 pm

August 7th, 2012, 1:33 am #5

http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backiss ... /dec70.pdf

Came across this on another website, and found it interesting. There are plenty of great stories, like the development of the NEW, soon to be going in to service, f-14a, A great read on the USS Langley, some interesting stories on aircraft losses, and how they could have been avoided (along with now expressly verbotten critiques of who/what went wrong. A great story about an officer who had just logged 3k hours in Buckeyes (yes, they were that old), and a blurb about the new, twin engine AH-1j that the USMC was about to buy for testing. Sorry, Bondo, it's ALL Navy, and nuthin BUT Navy.

Years ago, such small, indie mags and newsletters like this were common. LOTS of folks were more than happy to jot down a quick story or blurb. I recall finding a box full of newlstters from my dad's work. MILK TRUCK drivers had a newsletter! Our local IPMS used to have not only a monthly newsletter, but a quarterly magazine, and the rule was, in one or the other, but NOT both, and we never had problems getting folks to write. Anyhow, sit back, pop open a beverage, and enjoy the above!




"Bruce Springsteen? I LOVE him! He's like the American version of Bryan Adams!"

_Robin Sherbotsky
More about the safety aspects of naval aviation I think.

Chris
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Joined: July 12th, 2010, 12:04 am

August 7th, 2012, 2:03 am #6

http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backiss ... /dec70.pdf

Came across this on another website, and found it interesting. There are plenty of great stories, like the development of the NEW, soon to be going in to service, f-14a, A great read on the USS Langley, some interesting stories on aircraft losses, and how they could have been avoided (along with now expressly verbotten critiques of who/what went wrong. A great story about an officer who had just logged 3k hours in Buckeyes (yes, they were that old), and a blurb about the new, twin engine AH-1j that the USMC was about to buy for testing. Sorry, Bondo, it's ALL Navy, and nuthin BUT Navy.

Years ago, such small, indie mags and newsletters like this were common. LOTS of folks were more than happy to jot down a quick story or blurb. I recall finding a box full of newlstters from my dad's work. MILK TRUCK drivers had a newsletter! Our local IPMS used to have not only a monthly newsletter, but a quarterly magazine, and the rule was, in one or the other, but NOT both, and we never had problems getting folks to write. Anyhow, sit back, pop open a beverage, and enjoy the above!




"Bruce Springsteen? I LOVE him! He's like the American version of Bryan Adams!"

_Robin Sherbotsky
My older brother was on the Saratoga and ststioned at Whidby Is.

Steve
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Joined: May 18th, 2005, 7:03 pm

August 7th, 2012, 1:04 pm #7

More about the safety aspects of naval aviation I think.

Chris
Although it was more oriented towards ground safety issues and maintainers.

Don McIntyre
Clarksville, TN


"In this modern world of ours that spins as fast as these propellers do, if a man can cook, or fly, or play the guitar, he will be happy and never go hungry." "Where's Joe Merchant" Jimmy Buffet ©1992
Don McIntyre
Clarksville, TN


"The more I deal with people, the more I like my dog."
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 8:00 pm

August 7th, 2012, 1:37 pm #8

And what happened to the flying platform on page 26?
We actually tested it in the Army in the early '80's. It was some General in TACOM's dream that they'd carry it in the back of the truck and some GI would get in it and fly around and do recon.
The vehicle used weight shift and thrust deflection for control and was very difficult to fly. My friend, a 7000+ hour Army Aviator and trained test pilot, found it to be almost uncontrollable without heroic skill. There is a hilarious video of him trying to learn to fly it while suspended from a crane, where he falls of it numerous times. There was no way some minimally trained GI would be able to fly it.
It was powered by a Williams cruise missile engine situated between the pilot's legs. My friend said he was always concerned about certain parts of his anatomy if there was an uncontained turbine failure!
Being a direct jet lift vehicle, it was very inefficient and very sensitive to air temperature. At temperatures above 80 deg. F, it had an endurance of less than 10 minutes.
We called it the "Flying Trash Can". We actually built a mock-up as a joke for my test pilot friend out of a garbage can with some broomsticks for control levers, etc.
Some guy who used to work for Williams wrote a book trying to refute our test report, saying the WASP was a fantastic piece of technology, but the truth is it was a piece of something else...
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 4:24 pm

August 7th, 2012, 7:57 pm #9

Even so, WASP eidently had better endurance than the Bell rocket pack. I wonder if fly-by-wire would make a difference for the WASP (still, the engine is a problem - blade failure rises to a whole new level!).
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