My attempt to make the Kitty Hawk Banshee look a little better

.

My attempt to make the Kitty Hawk Banshee look a little better

Joined: June 6th, 2005, 5:56 am

January 5th, 2017, 11:57 pm #1

So the F2H-2 is a subject that's close to my heart and I was very excited when the Kitty Hawk Banshee was released. I bought three kits and started the kits immediately when they arrived. Like so many other modelers, I am really disappointed by this kit, by both the accuracy errors and also the poor kit engineering. The kit is over-engineered and over-complicated with too many gimmicky parts that fit poorly together. There are several accuracy problems that have been pointed out here often, with perhaps the overly thick wing root/intake/engine area as being the most glaring.
The wing problem bothered me, but I wasn't going to let it deter me from building the Banshee. My initial thoughts were to ignore the wing. Then I wondered if I could perhaps sand a bit of the "bulge" out of the kit part. I tried sanding down this area inside the tape:



I found that it did help reduce the bulge slightly, but it didn't do anything to reduce the arch of the wing root. The very top of the wing root sits too high on the fuselage and this contributes to the bulging wing. The sanding did not remedy this. I wondered if I could cut out the bulge and create a new camber to the wing root area. My goal isn't perfection, but to make the kit look a little better. I cut out the sanded area like this:



My next step was to build a lath on which I could add dental acrylic/superglue mix. I used strip styrene for this.



After my initial attempt at building a lath, I found that the top of the wing had lost it's shape and would no longer fit in the fuselage. I started over and this time, I taped the top of the wing to fuselage. This way, the fuselage would act as a jig to keep the wing in shape. I glued a couple strips in place while the wing was still attached to the fuselage. When the super glue was dried, the first couple strips held the wing to shape.






With the wing held in the correct shape by the first couple strips, I popped it out and glued in the rest of the strips. Then I added a dental acrylic (FreeFlow) /Zap a Gap mix (thanks for the inspiration Paul Budzik!) to fill the hole.




Once the the acrylic/superglue mix dried, I sanded to shape. Here is the final product taped in place. I was careful to make sure the new camber wouldn't interfere with the intake, engine, exhaust parts. I'm fairly confident it works. We'll see when I go to glue it all together!







The next step, once I get the wing and fuselage assembled and attached, is to fill the largish gap where the arch of the wingroot had previously been. I haven't decided on how yet, but I'll figure it out.

I think the new camber looks better, more Banshee-ish. What do you folks think?

Corey
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 26th, 2006, 10:38 pm

January 6th, 2017, 12:04 am #2

While I don't know if it will be perfect, it does look like you solved the bigger issue with the kit!

I used laminations to fill the same gap in my Hawk/Testors kit. If you look at the article, You'll see what I'm talking about...

Bravo for your courage, and execution!

One quick question...

How come this isn't in plastic pics?
Last edited by shogun66 on January 6th, 2017, 12:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
“Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don't have that problem.”
- Ronald Reagan

Semper Fi, Don
Luke: 22:36
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 6th, 2005, 5:56 am

January 6th, 2017, 12:09 am #3

nt
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 15th, 2010, 11:20 pm

January 6th, 2017, 12:20 am #4

So the F2H-2 is a subject that's close to my heart and I was very excited when the Kitty Hawk Banshee was released. I bought three kits and started the kits immediately when they arrived. Like so many other modelers, I am really disappointed by this kit, by both the accuracy errors and also the poor kit engineering. The kit is over-engineered and over-complicated with too many gimmicky parts that fit poorly together. There are several accuracy problems that have been pointed out here often, with perhaps the overly thick wing root/intake/engine area as being the most glaring.
The wing problem bothered me, but I wasn't going to let it deter me from building the Banshee. My initial thoughts were to ignore the wing. Then I wondered if I could perhaps sand a bit of the "bulge" out of the kit part. I tried sanding down this area inside the tape:



I found that it did help reduce the bulge slightly, but it didn't do anything to reduce the arch of the wing root. The very top of the wing root sits too high on the fuselage and this contributes to the bulging wing. The sanding did not remedy this. I wondered if I could cut out the bulge and create a new camber to the wing root area. My goal isn't perfection, but to make the kit look a little better. I cut out the sanded area like this:



My next step was to build a lath on which I could add dental acrylic/superglue mix. I used strip styrene for this.



After my initial attempt at building a lath, I found that the top of the wing had lost it's shape and would no longer fit in the fuselage. I started over and this time, I taped the top of the wing to fuselage. This way, the fuselage would act as a jig to keep the wing in shape. I glued a couple strips in place while the wing was still attached to the fuselage. When the super glue was dried, the first couple strips held the wing to shape.






With the wing held in the correct shape by the first couple strips, I popped it out and glued in the rest of the strips. Then I added a dental acrylic (FreeFlow) /Zap a Gap mix (thanks for the inspiration Paul Budzik!) to fill the hole.




Once the the acrylic/superglue mix dried, I sanded to shape. Here is the final product taped in place. I was careful to make sure the new camber wouldn't interfere with the intake, engine, exhaust parts. I'm fairly confident it works. We'll see when I go to glue it all together!







The next step, once I get the wing and fuselage assembled and attached, is to fill the largish gap where the arch of the wingroot had previously been. I haven't decided on how yet, but I'll figure it out.

I think the new camber looks better, more Banshee-ish. What do you folks think?

Corey
I guess it's a step up to the next level of modelling. Some may say it's obsessive, but I wouldn't; hats off to you for having a go.
Your results appear excellent - I'm looking forward to seeing how you overcome that wicked gap!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 19th, 2013, 2:03 am

January 6th, 2017, 12:28 am #5

So the F2H-2 is a subject that's close to my heart and I was very excited when the Kitty Hawk Banshee was released. I bought three kits and started the kits immediately when they arrived. Like so many other modelers, I am really disappointed by this kit, by both the accuracy errors and also the poor kit engineering. The kit is over-engineered and over-complicated with too many gimmicky parts that fit poorly together. There are several accuracy problems that have been pointed out here often, with perhaps the overly thick wing root/intake/engine area as being the most glaring.
The wing problem bothered me, but I wasn't going to let it deter me from building the Banshee. My initial thoughts were to ignore the wing. Then I wondered if I could perhaps sand a bit of the "bulge" out of the kit part. I tried sanding down this area inside the tape:



I found that it did help reduce the bulge slightly, but it didn't do anything to reduce the arch of the wing root. The very top of the wing root sits too high on the fuselage and this contributes to the bulging wing. The sanding did not remedy this. I wondered if I could cut out the bulge and create a new camber to the wing root area. My goal isn't perfection, but to make the kit look a little better. I cut out the sanded area like this:



My next step was to build a lath on which I could add dental acrylic/superglue mix. I used strip styrene for this.



After my initial attempt at building a lath, I found that the top of the wing had lost it's shape and would no longer fit in the fuselage. I started over and this time, I taped the top of the wing to fuselage. This way, the fuselage would act as a jig to keep the wing in shape. I glued a couple strips in place while the wing was still attached to the fuselage. When the super glue was dried, the first couple strips held the wing to shape.






With the wing held in the correct shape by the first couple strips, I popped it out and glued in the rest of the strips. Then I added a dental acrylic (FreeFlow) /Zap a Gap mix (thanks for the inspiration Paul Budzik!) to fill the hole.




Once the the acrylic/superglue mix dried, I sanded to shape. Here is the final product taped in place. I was careful to make sure the new camber wouldn't interfere with the intake, engine, exhaust parts. I'm fairly confident it works. We'll see when I go to glue it all together!







The next step, once I get the wing and fuselage assembled and attached, is to fill the largish gap where the arch of the wingroot had previously been. I haven't decided on how yet, but I'll figure it out.

I think the new camber looks better, more Banshee-ish. What do you folks think?

Corey
Nt
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 29th, 2006, 1:18 am

January 6th, 2017, 12:49 am #6

So the F2H-2 is a subject that's close to my heart and I was very excited when the Kitty Hawk Banshee was released. I bought three kits and started the kits immediately when they arrived. Like so many other modelers, I am really disappointed by this kit, by both the accuracy errors and also the poor kit engineering. The kit is over-engineered and over-complicated with too many gimmicky parts that fit poorly together. There are several accuracy problems that have been pointed out here often, with perhaps the overly thick wing root/intake/engine area as being the most glaring.
The wing problem bothered me, but I wasn't going to let it deter me from building the Banshee. My initial thoughts were to ignore the wing. Then I wondered if I could perhaps sand a bit of the "bulge" out of the kit part. I tried sanding down this area inside the tape:



I found that it did help reduce the bulge slightly, but it didn't do anything to reduce the arch of the wing root. The very top of the wing root sits too high on the fuselage and this contributes to the bulging wing. The sanding did not remedy this. I wondered if I could cut out the bulge and create a new camber to the wing root area. My goal isn't perfection, but to make the kit look a little better. I cut out the sanded area like this:



My next step was to build a lath on which I could add dental acrylic/superglue mix. I used strip styrene for this.



After my initial attempt at building a lath, I found that the top of the wing had lost it's shape and would no longer fit in the fuselage. I started over and this time, I taped the top of the wing to fuselage. This way, the fuselage would act as a jig to keep the wing in shape. I glued a couple strips in place while the wing was still attached to the fuselage. When the super glue was dried, the first couple strips held the wing to shape.






With the wing held in the correct shape by the first couple strips, I popped it out and glued in the rest of the strips. Then I added a dental acrylic (FreeFlow) /Zap a Gap mix (thanks for the inspiration Paul Budzik!) to fill the hole.




Once the the acrylic/superglue mix dried, I sanded to shape. Here is the final product taped in place. I was careful to make sure the new camber wouldn't interfere with the intake, engine, exhaust parts. I'm fairly confident it works. We'll see when I go to glue it all together!







The next step, once I get the wing and fuselage assembled and attached, is to fill the largish gap where the arch of the wingroot had previously been. I haven't decided on how yet, but I'll figure it out.

I think the new camber looks better, more Banshee-ish. What do you folks think?

Corey
Fixing things to improve accuracy is what modeling is all about.

And in case you overlooked it, look for my post about available Banshee loft line drawings.
Michael McMurtrey
IPMS-USA #1746
IPMS-Canada #1426
CAHS #5646
Carrollton, TX

Proud IPMS-USA Low Number Thumper!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 26th, 2002, 4:32 am

January 6th, 2017, 12:51 am #7

So the F2H-2 is a subject that's close to my heart and I was very excited when the Kitty Hawk Banshee was released. I bought three kits and started the kits immediately when they arrived. Like so many other modelers, I am really disappointed by this kit, by both the accuracy errors and also the poor kit engineering. The kit is over-engineered and over-complicated with too many gimmicky parts that fit poorly together. There are several accuracy problems that have been pointed out here often, with perhaps the overly thick wing root/intake/engine area as being the most glaring.
The wing problem bothered me, but I wasn't going to let it deter me from building the Banshee. My initial thoughts were to ignore the wing. Then I wondered if I could perhaps sand a bit of the "bulge" out of the kit part. I tried sanding down this area inside the tape:



I found that it did help reduce the bulge slightly, but it didn't do anything to reduce the arch of the wing root. The very top of the wing root sits too high on the fuselage and this contributes to the bulging wing. The sanding did not remedy this. I wondered if I could cut out the bulge and create a new camber to the wing root area. My goal isn't perfection, but to make the kit look a little better. I cut out the sanded area like this:



My next step was to build a lath on which I could add dental acrylic/superglue mix. I used strip styrene for this.



After my initial attempt at building a lath, I found that the top of the wing had lost it's shape and would no longer fit in the fuselage. I started over and this time, I taped the top of the wing to fuselage. This way, the fuselage would act as a jig to keep the wing in shape. I glued a couple strips in place while the wing was still attached to the fuselage. When the super glue was dried, the first couple strips held the wing to shape.






With the wing held in the correct shape by the first couple strips, I popped it out and glued in the rest of the strips. Then I added a dental acrylic (FreeFlow) /Zap a Gap mix (thanks for the inspiration Paul Budzik!) to fill the hole.




Once the the acrylic/superglue mix dried, I sanded to shape. Here is the final product taped in place. I was careful to make sure the new camber wouldn't interfere with the intake, engine, exhaust parts. I'm fairly confident it works. We'll see when I go to glue it all together!







The next step, once I get the wing and fuselage assembled and attached, is to fill the largish gap where the arch of the wingroot had previously been. I haven't decided on how yet, but I'll figure it out.

I think the new camber looks better, more Banshee-ish. What do you folks think?

Corey
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 25th, 2012, 1:39 am

January 6th, 2017, 12:56 am #8

So the F2H-2 is a subject that's close to my heart and I was very excited when the Kitty Hawk Banshee was released. I bought three kits and started the kits immediately when they arrived. Like so many other modelers, I am really disappointed by this kit, by both the accuracy errors and also the poor kit engineering. The kit is over-engineered and over-complicated with too many gimmicky parts that fit poorly together. There are several accuracy problems that have been pointed out here often, with perhaps the overly thick wing root/intake/engine area as being the most glaring.
The wing problem bothered me, but I wasn't going to let it deter me from building the Banshee. My initial thoughts were to ignore the wing. Then I wondered if I could perhaps sand a bit of the "bulge" out of the kit part. I tried sanding down this area inside the tape:



I found that it did help reduce the bulge slightly, but it didn't do anything to reduce the arch of the wing root. The very top of the wing root sits too high on the fuselage and this contributes to the bulging wing. The sanding did not remedy this. I wondered if I could cut out the bulge and create a new camber to the wing root area. My goal isn't perfection, but to make the kit look a little better. I cut out the sanded area like this:



My next step was to build a lath on which I could add dental acrylic/superglue mix. I used strip styrene for this.



After my initial attempt at building a lath, I found that the top of the wing had lost it's shape and would no longer fit in the fuselage. I started over and this time, I taped the top of the wing to fuselage. This way, the fuselage would act as a jig to keep the wing in shape. I glued a couple strips in place while the wing was still attached to the fuselage. When the super glue was dried, the first couple strips held the wing to shape.






With the wing held in the correct shape by the first couple strips, I popped it out and glued in the rest of the strips. Then I added a dental acrylic (FreeFlow) /Zap a Gap mix (thanks for the inspiration Paul Budzik!) to fill the hole.




Once the the acrylic/superglue mix dried, I sanded to shape. Here is the final product taped in place. I was careful to make sure the new camber wouldn't interfere with the intake, engine, exhaust parts. I'm fairly confident it works. We'll see when I go to glue it all together!







The next step, once I get the wing and fuselage assembled and attached, is to fill the largish gap where the arch of the wingroot had previously been. I haven't decided on how yet, but I'll figure it out.

I think the new camber looks better, more Banshee-ish. What do you folks think?

Corey
That's some nifty modeling. n/t
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 27th, 2005, 1:52 am

January 6th, 2017, 1:23 am #9

So the F2H-2 is a subject that's close to my heart and I was very excited when the Kitty Hawk Banshee was released. I bought three kits and started the kits immediately when they arrived. Like so many other modelers, I am really disappointed by this kit, by both the accuracy errors and also the poor kit engineering. The kit is over-engineered and over-complicated with too many gimmicky parts that fit poorly together. There are several accuracy problems that have been pointed out here often, with perhaps the overly thick wing root/intake/engine area as being the most glaring.
The wing problem bothered me, but I wasn't going to let it deter me from building the Banshee. My initial thoughts were to ignore the wing. Then I wondered if I could perhaps sand a bit of the "bulge" out of the kit part. I tried sanding down this area inside the tape:



I found that it did help reduce the bulge slightly, but it didn't do anything to reduce the arch of the wing root. The very top of the wing root sits too high on the fuselage and this contributes to the bulging wing. The sanding did not remedy this. I wondered if I could cut out the bulge and create a new camber to the wing root area. My goal isn't perfection, but to make the kit look a little better. I cut out the sanded area like this:



My next step was to build a lath on which I could add dental acrylic/superglue mix. I used strip styrene for this.



After my initial attempt at building a lath, I found that the top of the wing had lost it's shape and would no longer fit in the fuselage. I started over and this time, I taped the top of the wing to fuselage. This way, the fuselage would act as a jig to keep the wing in shape. I glued a couple strips in place while the wing was still attached to the fuselage. When the super glue was dried, the first couple strips held the wing to shape.






With the wing held in the correct shape by the first couple strips, I popped it out and glued in the rest of the strips. Then I added a dental acrylic (FreeFlow) /Zap a Gap mix (thanks for the inspiration Paul Budzik!) to fill the hole.




Once the the acrylic/superglue mix dried, I sanded to shape. Here is the final product taped in place. I was careful to make sure the new camber wouldn't interfere with the intake, engine, exhaust parts. I'm fairly confident it works. We'll see when I go to glue it all together!







The next step, once I get the wing and fuselage assembled and attached, is to fill the largish gap where the arch of the wingroot had previously been. I haven't decided on how yet, but I'll figure it out.

I think the new camber looks better, more Banshee-ish. What do you folks think?

Corey
I knew it could be improved but it's more than I would wrestle with. I will enjoy seeing it when you're finished.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 19th, 2013, 2:50 pm

January 6th, 2017, 1:31 am #10

So the F2H-2 is a subject that's close to my heart and I was very excited when the Kitty Hawk Banshee was released. I bought three kits and started the kits immediately when they arrived. Like so many other modelers, I am really disappointed by this kit, by both the accuracy errors and also the poor kit engineering. The kit is over-engineered and over-complicated with too many gimmicky parts that fit poorly together. There are several accuracy problems that have been pointed out here often, with perhaps the overly thick wing root/intake/engine area as being the most glaring.
The wing problem bothered me, but I wasn't going to let it deter me from building the Banshee. My initial thoughts were to ignore the wing. Then I wondered if I could perhaps sand a bit of the "bulge" out of the kit part. I tried sanding down this area inside the tape:



I found that it did help reduce the bulge slightly, but it didn't do anything to reduce the arch of the wing root. The very top of the wing root sits too high on the fuselage and this contributes to the bulging wing. The sanding did not remedy this. I wondered if I could cut out the bulge and create a new camber to the wing root area. My goal isn't perfection, but to make the kit look a little better. I cut out the sanded area like this:



My next step was to build a lath on which I could add dental acrylic/superglue mix. I used strip styrene for this.



After my initial attempt at building a lath, I found that the top of the wing had lost it's shape and would no longer fit in the fuselage. I started over and this time, I taped the top of the wing to fuselage. This way, the fuselage would act as a jig to keep the wing in shape. I glued a couple strips in place while the wing was still attached to the fuselage. When the super glue was dried, the first couple strips held the wing to shape.






With the wing held in the correct shape by the first couple strips, I popped it out and glued in the rest of the strips. Then I added a dental acrylic (FreeFlow) /Zap a Gap mix (thanks for the inspiration Paul Budzik!) to fill the hole.




Once the the acrylic/superglue mix dried, I sanded to shape. Here is the final product taped in place. I was careful to make sure the new camber wouldn't interfere with the intake, engine, exhaust parts. I'm fairly confident it works. We'll see when I go to glue it all together!







The next step, once I get the wing and fuselage assembled and attached, is to fill the largish gap where the arch of the wingroot had previously been. I haven't decided on how yet, but I'll figure it out.

I think the new camber looks better, more Banshee-ish. What do you folks think?

Corey
any chance you can cast a master and have one of our resin gurus cast some copies? I would be in for at least 3 copies.
Quote
Like
Share