Modelling lights...which is the best light temperature..?

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Modelling lights...which is the best light temperature..?

Joined: October 11th, 2006, 7:55 pm

March 13th, 2018, 9:07 pm #1

I am replacing my old incandescent lights and tried some different led bulbs with different Ks between 2700º K (a little too yellow) and 4000ºK (seller said natural light).
Any expert here that can give any hints please ?
TIA Ciao
Maurizio
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 2:09 pm

March 13th, 2018, 9:14 pm #2

The lights in my room are about 2700, so to avoid "it looks different", I have the same in my desk lamp. I use LED floods.

But for helping me see small stuff I have a cool white spot in another lamp. But it can be too cold and bright to comfortably model.

Take the model outside and it will be different, take it to a model show where they use various fluorescent, it will look different again.
Steven “Modeldad” Eisenman

'Storm's A-Comin' Baby'
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Joined: March 1st, 2005, 4:23 pm

March 13th, 2018, 10:03 pm #3

I am replacing my old incandescent lights and tried some different led bulbs with different Ks between 2700º K (a little too yellow) and 4000ºK (seller said natural light).
Any expert here that can give any hints please ?
TIA Ciao
Maurizio
I believe the bulb people state that a temperature of between 3500°K and 4100°K is considered BRIGHT white. I use the Ottlite desk lamp on my desk and that is supposed to be Daylight with a light temp range of 5000°K to 6000°K. I have 2 on my desk and I like them. Easy on the eyes too. You also don't have to go the Ottlite route as most hardware stores now carry Daylight LEDs or even Daylight CFLs that fit in regular lamps. I have the Daylight LEDs in other lamps in my house.

I picked up my desk lamps at my local Costco.

Cheers
Chris
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Joined: January 7th, 2010, 6:31 am

March 13th, 2018, 10:27 pm #4

I am replacing my old incandescent lights and tried some different led bulbs with different Ks between 2700º K (a little too yellow) and 4000ºK (seller said natural light).
Any expert here that can give any hints please ?
TIA Ciao
Maurizio
I have a series of overhead fluorescents in which I mix 2700, 4000 and 6000 bulbs.
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Joined: January 26th, 2004, 9:36 pm

March 13th, 2018, 11:38 pm #5

I believe the bulb people state that a temperature of between 3500°K and 4100°K is considered BRIGHT white. I use the Ottlite desk lamp on my desk and that is supposed to be Daylight with a light temp range of 5000°K to 6000°K. I have 2 on my desk and I like them. Easy on the eyes too. You also don't have to go the Ottlite route as most hardware stores now carry Daylight LEDs or even Daylight CFLs that fit in regular lamps. I have the Daylight LEDs in other lamps in my house.

I picked up my desk lamps at my local Costco.

Cheers
Chris
I have been using Ottlites on my modeling workbench for many years.

It is better to be the Stomper rather than the Stompee!
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Joined: February 28th, 2005, 5:19 am

March 14th, 2018, 12:02 am #6

Unobtrusive, and puts out just the right amount of light.
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Joined: February 25th, 2012, 1:39 am

March 14th, 2018, 12:26 am #7

I am replacing my old incandescent lights and tried some different led bulbs with different Ks between 2700º K (a little too yellow) and 4000ºK (seller said natural light).
Any expert here that can give any hints please ?
TIA Ciao
Maurizio
5500K is regarded as “daylight balance,” the precise color of midday sun, and an industry standard in terms of the “correct” color of light. In practice, it is the preferred source in which to mix or view colors. Based on that, what you are looking for is a 5500K light source.

As Modeldad points out, what color light your model is viewed under could vary wildly. However, a viewers brain won’t perceive those shifts and the colors will be seen as correct, regardless of the light source in which they are viewed.

Only when mixing a color in badly unbalanced light, then viewing it under a daylight balanced source, is there a risk of the color looking really screwy. The safe bet is to model under a 5500K bulb and trust it will look fine regardless where it is displayed.
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 2:46 pm

March 14th, 2018, 4:40 am #8

I am replacing my old incandescent lights and tried some different led bulbs with different Ks between 2700º K (a little too yellow) and 4000ºK (seller said natural light).
Any expert here that can give any hints please ?
TIA Ciao
Maurizio
I always use a combination lamp over my work surface, Fig. 2. (The image in the glass was done for effect) Overhead, I use fluorescent tubes, Fig. 3. The key to fluorescents are that they need to be color balanced. Do not confuse color balance with color temperature. If you look on the label of fluorescents, you will see two numbers: Color Temperature and CRI (color rendering index). It is essential that you understand the difference. Color temperature refers to the temperature of the total wavelength of the tube but does not describe the recipe of the spectrum elements that generate that temperature. The CRI relates to how close is the tube’s balance of spectrum elements when compared to sunlight. In other words, you can use many different mixes and come up with 5000K but what is essential is the spectrum mix be as close to sunlight as possible. The minimum CRI for any sort of color accuracy is 90. The gold standard was the T12 Chroma 50’s. Today, the current standard size tube is the T8 that have only recently become available in high CRI tubes. Color balanced CFL’s are available through photographic equipment suppliers and color balanced circular fluorescents are also available. To understand the importance of these lighting elements, I can suggest no better source than chapter 1 in the book, “Color Management,” by Bruce Fraser, Chris Murphy, and Fred Bunting.



Paul


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Joined: November 24th, 2008, 8:53 pm

March 14th, 2018, 7:19 am #9

5500K is regarded as “daylight balance,” the precise color of midday sun, and an industry standard in terms of the “correct” color of light. In practice, it is the preferred source in which to mix or view colors. Based on that, what you are looking for is a 5500K light source.

As Modeldad points out, what color light your model is viewed under could vary wildly. However, a viewers brain won’t perceive those shifts and the colors will be seen as correct, regardless of the light source in which they are viewed.

Only when mixing a color in badly unbalanced light, then viewing it under a daylight balanced source, is there a risk of the color looking really screwy. The safe bet is to model under a 5500K bulb and trust it will look fine regardless where it is displayed.
Once the colors are matched and sorted,,,,it doesn't matter what bulb you are building under.

When we reach for that bottle of 34079 for our SEA Phantom, we are going to paint it over the primer color where it goes. Same with 34102, 30219.

No bulb changes the color so much that we reach for our favorite Tan and accidentally paint our favorite Dark Green on the model.

Bulb color only matters when it comes to the modeler's comfort as he paints the parts.
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Joined: September 17th, 2012, 8:52 am

March 14th, 2018, 8:30 am #10

I am replacing my old incandescent lights and tried some different led bulbs with different Ks between 2700º K (a little too yellow) and 4000ºK (seller said natural light).
Any expert here that can give any hints please ?
TIA Ciao
Maurizio
I've just installed an LED "smart bulb" that comes with a phone app, you can adjust not only the colour balance but even the colour! It is wireless and can be switched on and off over the internets.
Brand TP-Link, Model LB130
Beer Expert.
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