Model Master non-specular sea blue (FS#5402)

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Model Master non-specular sea blue (FS#5402)

Joined: March 4th, 2005, 9:12 am

April 4th, 2012, 9:58 am #1


I am going to be painting the upper cam colour on the PV-1 Ventura and decided to go for the Model Master paints for this as I don't like to mix paints.

I bought two different bottles, FS15042 Dark Sea Blue and FS35042 Flat Sea Blue. From memory the only difference that should occur is that the '1' means gloss and the '3' means flat but the COLOUR should be the same. Unfortunately when I just did a brush paint test it turns out that these are two different paint colours from Model Master. The FS15042 is more 'blue' than the FS35042 which is more darker.

Anyone have thoughts on which one is more correct of the two?


Warmest regards,

David Harvey
Editor
Aussie Modeller International.
http://www.aussiemodeller.com.au
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Joined: February 28th, 2005, 4:05 pm

April 4th, 2012, 11:08 am #2

Hi David,

This answer won't tell you which color is "correct," but it could be that both are. Nonspecular Sea Blue, Semigloss Sea Blue, and Glossy Sea Blue were three similar colors with similar names, but they weren't identical. You cannot simply apply a future or clear flat to one of the paints to accurately create the others. When TT-595, FS-595, and FS-595a were created, the three colors were given similar numbers (the first digit changed on the FS charts) but they continued to represent slightly different hues.

On the "three-toned" PV-1 you'll need Semigloss Sea Blue on the wings and horizontal tail, and Nonspecular Sea Blue on the leading edges of the flying surfaces (where the color demarkaton should be distinct) and fuselage.

The ANA chips are still fairly common, so perhaps someone else can compare the ModelMaster paints to the originals, but I suspect that might already be on the money.

Cheers,



Dana
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Joined: March 4th, 2005, 9:12 am

April 4th, 2012, 12:05 pm #3


Your answer cleared it up a bit and answered something I found odd in previous discussions on the PV-1 ie the use of different FS#5042 for the different areas. I found it odd that one part would be semi gloss and the other matt but being slightly different colours actualy makes sense.

I looked at the IPMS Stockholm site and then at the FS comparison chips on the site and I could not pick a difference between FS1/2/35042 on my screen for the colours they showed.

When looking at images on the net I can't really pick up a differenece of colour/hue on the real acft. I would get away with doing either of the colours but may just use them in the correct manner as you suggested for something different. Most models I can also not pick a difference on the upper surfaces so I guess they put the one colour on the majority of images on the internet.


Warmest regards,

David Harvey
Editor
Aussie Modeller International.
http://www.aussiemodeller.com.au
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Joined: February 28th, 2005, 5:27 am

April 4th, 2012, 12:22 pm #4

Hi David,

This answer won't tell you which color is "correct," but it could be that both are. Nonspecular Sea Blue, Semigloss Sea Blue, and Glossy Sea Blue were three similar colors with similar names, but they weren't identical. You cannot simply apply a future or clear flat to one of the paints to accurately create the others. When TT-595, FS-595, and FS-595a were created, the three colors were given similar numbers (the first digit changed on the FS charts) but they continued to represent slightly different hues.

On the "three-toned" PV-1 you'll need Semigloss Sea Blue on the wings and horizontal tail, and Nonspecular Sea Blue on the leading edges of the flying surfaces (where the color demarkaton should be distinct) and fuselage.

The ANA chips are still fairly common, so perhaps someone else can compare the ModelMaster paints to the originals, but I suspect that might already be on the money.

Cheers,



Dana
Sometimes they left the original blue-gray instead of repainting intermediate blue, sometimes there was no intermediate blue, but the sea blue was lightly sprayed over the white to give the illusion of intermediate blue (3-tone with only 2 paints, I have an excellent pic of a Brewster Buccaneer showing that), sometimes 3 colors and sometimes 4, as you have pointed out.

Sometimes the pattern was different, too, for the same aircraft type, e.g. factory vs. depot painted Hellcats.

Quick question - factory painted F6F-3's in three tone - were they really 4-tone as you describe? I have an Avenger schematic showing the 4-tone in my database. I'm thinking the Hellcat would be the same, but don't know.
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Joined: February 24th, 2002, 12:50 pm

April 4th, 2012, 12:32 pm #5

...was only specified for bombers, not fighters.





Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
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Joined: November 24th, 2008, 8:53 pm

April 4th, 2012, 12:35 pm #6

Your answer cleared it up a bit and answered something I found odd in previous discussions on the PV-1 ie the use of different FS#5042 for the different areas. I found it odd that one part would be semi gloss and the other matt but being slightly different colours actualy makes sense.

I looked at the IPMS Stockholm site and then at the FS comparison chips on the site and I could not pick a difference between FS1/2/35042 on my screen for the colours they showed.

When looking at images on the net I can't really pick up a differenece of colour/hue on the real acft. I would get away with doing either of the colours but may just use them in the correct manner as you suggested for something different. Most models I can also not pick a difference on the upper surfaces so I guess they put the one colour on the majority of images on the internet.


Warmest regards,

David Harvey
Editor
Aussie Modeller International.
http://www.aussiemodeller.com.au
you have to switch pages on this one, but it can help see the difference

http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/page-RGB-colors-UK.html

just look at either the RGB or the Hex codes for each FS color you want to see,,,,you can see they are different on at least this one chart

you can "open and squeeze" 3 colors to place tiny windows next to each other to check the differences

then you can compare your paints to each other,,,,it's not exact, but, "a little bluer" is at least some info to work with

Rex

one from each squadron??,,"geeez Rex, how many display cases will that take up?"

http://hangardeckview.blogspot.com/
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Joined: February 24th, 2002, 12:50 pm

April 4th, 2012, 12:39 pm #7

I am going to be painting the upper cam colour on the PV-1 Ventura and decided to go for the Model Master paints for this as I don't like to mix paints.

I bought two different bottles, FS15042 Dark Sea Blue and FS35042 Flat Sea Blue. From memory the only difference that should occur is that the '1' means gloss and the '3' means flat but the COLOUR should be the same. Unfortunately when I just did a brush paint test it turns out that these are two different paint colours from Model Master. The FS15042 is more 'blue' than the FS35042 which is more darker.

Anyone have thoughts on which one is more correct of the two?


Warmest regards,

David Harvey
Editor
Aussie Modeller International.
http://www.aussiemodeller.com.au
Non-Specular Sea Blue was notorious for fading. Factory fresh it was VERY dark, what you might call a "midnight blue." After some time in the Pacific sun it would fade to a medium turquoise color with greenish tones (very commonly seen in good color WWII photos); after even more fading it could become almost as light as Intermediate Blue and almost indistinguishable from it (this was apparently fairly rare).

All the Model Master 35042 I've ever bought is lighter and a hair "greener" than their 15042. I've always thought it looked like NSSB with light to moderate fading going on. If yours is darker than the 15042, perhaps Testors has changed the formula to reflect the factory fresh color.

As I said, check your reference photos. It could well be that the particular airplane you want to build has faded Sea Blue to one degree or another on it.







Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
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Joined: April 30th, 2010, 9:24 pm

April 4th, 2012, 4:04 pm #8

...was only specified for bombers, not fighters.





Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
These are from the TBM and FM-2 E&Ms:
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[/IMG]
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Joined: January 22nd, 2008, 2:04 am

April 4th, 2012, 9:45 pm #9

Non-Specular Sea Blue was notorious for fading. Factory fresh it was VERY dark, what you might call a "midnight blue." After some time in the Pacific sun it would fade to a medium turquoise color with greenish tones (very commonly seen in good color WWII photos); after even more fading it could become almost as light as Intermediate Blue and almost indistinguishable from it (this was apparently fairly rare).

All the Model Master 35042 I've ever bought is lighter and a hair "greener" than their 15042. I've always thought it looked like NSSB with light to moderate fading going on. If yours is darker than the 15042, perhaps Testors has changed the formula to reflect the factory fresh color.

As I said, check your reference photos. It could well be that the particular airplane you want to build has faded Sea Blue to one degree or another on it.







Steel cuts flesh. Steel cuts bone. Steel does not cut steel. --Stephen Hunter, The 47th Samurai.

We will march on a road of bones. --Hunter S. Thompson.

Sat Cong!
I have an old bottle from years ago (flat sea blue) and it has the green cast to it, the new bottle I recently perchased has NO green cast, looks like a flat version of the gloss color.

Old Digger Pilot
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Joined: August 24th, 2004, 8:51 pm

April 4th, 2012, 10:50 pm #10

I am going to be painting the upper cam colour on the PV-1 Ventura and decided to go for the Model Master paints for this as I don't like to mix paints.

I bought two different bottles, FS15042 Dark Sea Blue and FS35042 Flat Sea Blue. From memory the only difference that should occur is that the '1' means gloss and the '3' means flat but the COLOUR should be the same. Unfortunately when I just did a brush paint test it turns out that these are two different paint colours from Model Master. The FS15042 is more 'blue' than the FS35042 which is more darker.

Anyone have thoughts on which one is more correct of the two?


Warmest regards,

David Harvey
Editor
Aussie Modeller International.
http://www.aussiemodeller.com.au
for a month or three - what does it matter?

Want to do one right off the line? - it matters.

Joe

Average Modeler and Builder of legacy kits Beyond the Pale. Proud builder of 3' "shelf" models for over half a century; 4' for Spits.
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