Messerschmitt Me 209 H (or is it the Bf 109 V-55?)

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Joined: May 17th, 2005, 3:19 am

June 20th, 2018, 2:43 am #51

The build has now progressed to the weathering stage. First up is the oil wash. I mix medium grey and burnt umber for a dirty base then selectively add white or black to lighten or darken it. The application is pure slop. I use a thick mix of the oils and slather it on panel lines and rivet rows. This may hurt your eyes:

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Leave it set up for at least 20 minutes, which is about the time it takes to finish half of the fuselage or a wing. Then grab your 500 count box of Q-tips. You'll need most of them. Wipe off the paint either in the direction of airflow (wings) or downward (fuselage). I really wanted to get a well-used dirty look to this model, similar to a Ta 152 prototype that appears in Hitchcock's book on that subject. The painted model didn't give that effect, but after the application of oil grime, it is much closer to what I had envisioned. I didn't have much time this evening, so only the upper surfaces got the treatment.
One comment. The rivets came out much more subtly than I expected. Perhaps because I have applied a number of gloss coats, but I like the effect. It seems you never know how certain things will come out until you do them...

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Another beauty of oil washes is that you can continue to adjust them for at least a day, so mistakes aren't really permanent until the model is sealed with another gloss coat.

Thanks for looking and for your comments.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:37 am

June 20th, 2018, 7:15 pm #52

Coming along brilliantly Barry (can you tell I just returned from England? :) )!

Questions: I'm guessing your oil wash is over some sort of acrylic gloss coat? Which one, specifically? Are those true oil washes, or "water based" oils? Do you use a damp Q-tip, or dry to wipe off the excess? If damp, what do you use to wet it?

GIL
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Joined: May 17th, 2005, 3:19 am

June 20th, 2018, 11:13 pm #53

Hi Gil, Thanks for the compliments. My gloss coat  is Gunze GX-100, which is in their lacquer line. It is very tough and dries quickly. The oils paints are Winsor & Newton, the genuine article. And I use only dry Q-tips, which makes an interesting distinction. A dry Q-tip will rub in the color. If you get more aggressive, you can rub most of it off, but the patina of the color will remain. Even a damp Q-tip will rub off most of the color. Occasionally, to replicate an oil or grime streak I will put a dot of oil paint on the model and feather it back with a brush dampened with odorless thinner. I find this more difficult since it is very easy to wipe the paint off completely. Experiment with a practice model. Oil paints open many possibilities; I think you'll like them.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:27 am

June 21st, 2018, 3:33 am #54

Gil, Barry was kind enough to walk me through his technique on oils and a whole new world opened up. I had been using enamel washes and gave them up, I am totally converted.. I think you would really like the effect oils deliver. See you in Phoenix?
Pat D
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:37 am

June 21st, 2018, 5:06 am #55

Thanks for the more specific info guys! I have some oils, but have been reluctant to dive in and use them.

Unfortunately I have to skip Phoenix this time. One daughter got married last weekend (in England) and another is getting married in Sept. in Philly, so my vacation time is all taken up!

See ya'll in 'Nooga in '19!

GIL
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Joined: May 17th, 2005, 3:19 am

June 22nd, 2018, 5:54 pm #56

Sorry you won't be in Phoenix this year, Gil. It is always great to catch up with you and see your work.

A bit more progress to report. I've applied the flat coat, in this case Gunze 182, which does even more to harmonize the paint, markings and weathering.

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I've also begun working on some of the accessories. For the landing gear the best solution seemed to be lengthening the kit part with Plastruct rod.


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First up was adding Bare Metal foil for the wider sections. Then .04mm Albion alloys tube was glued on for brake line guides. From practice I've learned the best way to do this it to apply some Tamiya liquid glue to the gear to give a sticky surface. Then the tube sections were stuck in place and and when dry, a tiny drop of superglue is placed on both sides using a bit of very thin stretched sprue. Sprue seems to hold the glue better than wire. This must be done carefully to avoid filling in the tube. Finally, a length of Detail Master coated wire, with the loop pre-formed, was threaded through the tubes. Sounds easy, doesn't it. Well the number of failures and 
re-dos tell me it really isn't.

Here's one gear after its initial coat of RLM 76.


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Also in the works are the gear doors. These are the inner doors, made from .010" and .005" plastic sheet.


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As always, thanks for following and your compliments.
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Joined: January 5th, 2018, 10:10 am

June 22nd, 2018, 7:00 pm #57

Getting closer to another masterpiece Barry......great work and again great inspiration. I particularly like your use of the foil wrap on the gear legs......gives me ideas for some of my builds.

Gerry
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Joined: May 17th, 2005, 3:19 am

June 24th, 2018, 8:48 pm #58

Thanks, Gerry!

Just a bit of progress to report. The gear has been weathered with oil paints and the oleos done by applying Uschi Van der Rosten chrome powder with an artist's stump the has been cut to a chisel shape. This is a very efficient way of representing this section; no masking and it is done in a few minutes. Also, it seems to represent metal more effectively than paint of foils. Apologies for the somewhat out of focus photo. I'll try for a better one.


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I've added the exhaust stains, which can be nerve wracking since you don't want to overdo it. As a result I've understated them. She also got to try on the finished prop, which makes her look seriously more lethal. After the stains have completely dried (this takes some time since they are at least 9/1 mix of thinner/paint), I'll use some Vallejo flat coat to dull them down. This is the flattest flat on earth and perfect for the job. 

Engineers occasionally marked the Werk Nummer on the prop or spinner with chalk. I duplicated this with a light grey water color pencil. At the moment only one prop blade and the spinner have been "fixed" with clear flat. The additional umber on the other blade seems redundant and will be removed with a wet Q-tip. 


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More soon.
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Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:16 am

June 24th, 2018, 9:56 pm #59

😃
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

June 24th, 2018, 10:25 pm #60

Understated beats overdone. Looks like plenty from here. Well-represented and not a distraction, I'd call that perfect.
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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