Luftwaffe Desert Camouflage Question

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Luftwaffe Desert Camouflage Question

Joined: March 4th, 2005, 6:19 pm

March 26th, 2012, 8:26 pm #1

Does anyone know if there was a standard or official spec for the comouflage applied to Ju-87s and Ju-88s stationed in North Africa? Specifically the RLM 79/80/78 where the upper surfaces were tan with large green blotches? It seems that the size of the green blotches varried from fairly large to pretty small and the spacing from very close to fairly spread out.

I'm guessing this was more often than not a field application which would explain the variety.

Oh, and I am NOT referring to the tan camouflage applied over 70/71 schemes just to be clear.

Thanks.

Tory
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Joined: February 26th, 2005, 11:56 pm

March 27th, 2012, 2:06 am #2

Mr. Mucaro,

I usually stay away from paint questions, but your opening inquiry, regarding "a standard or official spec," is an easy answer. Examining as many photos of St.G. 3 aircraft as I can find for many years, there is no 'standard' pattern, and in the case of their later Ju 87D-1s and D-3s, these are almost always exclusively 70/71. As to the earlier Ju 87B/R series, solid RLM 79 without any additional blotches or spots is also common, but these tropical finishes seem to have been applied at depots in Italy or in Greece (a friend is going through all of the Mediterranean ULTRA intercepts, and forwards me the reports of Stukas repaired and ready for dispatch), not in North Africa -- the desert was 'empty' of suitable facilities.

The Ju 88A units, specifically the LG 1, also seem to have favored a solid finish more frequently than spotted variations. To provide a famous example, Helbig's A-5 WNr.4371 had its original 70/71 oversprayed with a light sand color (whether RLM 79 or an Italian color I cannot say), with no additional mottling.

Some 109Es were delivered to the I/JG 27 already "spotted", but others were the solid-RLM 79 that the later 109F-4s were provided with. A very few of the G-2s that arrived in the autumn of 1942 were 'spotted,' most are solid RLM 79 on top. JG 77 is another story altogether -- their III Gruppe arrived directly from Russia without any time to spare for repainting.

As to painting-advice, I'd suggest referring a photo (or photos if you're lucky) a specific machine for a scheme you favor. Assuming that the next machine in the squadron would be painted the same way is, in the Luftwaffe, "uncertain."

Hope this is of some help, GRM
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Joined: February 14th, 2006, 4:50 pm

March 27th, 2012, 11:19 am #3

I did some digging on this very subject and based on what Google and my own decent library could provide, the evidence suggests modelers are more prone to paint their desert camo bomber models this way than the actual Luftwaffe did. Or maybe the rolls and rolls of film that showed such aeroplanes in 1942-43 have been lost?

Evidence seems scant at best.

Con-firmed! It's a cruel world, Herr Hauptman. You said so yourself.
--Bruno Stachel
Last edited by hawx on March 27th, 2012, 11:39 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 4th, 2005, 6:19 pm

March 27th, 2012, 12:40 pm #4

Mr. Mucaro,

I usually stay away from paint questions, but your opening inquiry, regarding "a standard or official spec," is an easy answer. Examining as many photos of St.G. 3 aircraft as I can find for many years, there is no 'standard' pattern, and in the case of their later Ju 87D-1s and D-3s, these are almost always exclusively 70/71. As to the earlier Ju 87B/R series, solid RLM 79 without any additional blotches or spots is also common, but these tropical finishes seem to have been applied at depots in Italy or in Greece (a friend is going through all of the Mediterranean ULTRA intercepts, and forwards me the reports of Stukas repaired and ready for dispatch), not in North Africa -- the desert was 'empty' of suitable facilities.

The Ju 88A units, specifically the LG 1, also seem to have favored a solid finish more frequently than spotted variations. To provide a famous example, Helbig's A-5 WNr.4371 had its original 70/71 oversprayed with a light sand color (whether RLM 79 or an Italian color I cannot say), with no additional mottling.

Some 109Es were delivered to the I/JG 27 already "spotted", but others were the solid-RLM 79 that the later 109F-4s were provided with. A very few of the G-2s that arrived in the autumn of 1942 were 'spotted,' most are solid RLM 79 on top. JG 77 is another story altogether -- their III Gruppe arrived directly from Russia without any time to spare for repainting.

As to painting-advice, I'd suggest referring a photo (or photos if you're lucky) a specific machine for a scheme you favor. Assuming that the next machine in the squadron would be painted the same way is, in the Luftwaffe, "uncertain."

Hope this is of some help, GRM
And between your response and that of Mr. Hawkey I feel pretty confident that examples of this type of camouflage are few and far between most likely because it wasn't applied all that often. However we model builders can't resist interesting paint schemes and have probably modeled it more than it was actually applied!

Anyway, Thanks you both for taking the time to research this for me!

Tory
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Joined: October 8th, 2008, 4:14 am

March 29th, 2012, 12:50 am #5

Does anyone know if there was a standard or official spec for the comouflage applied to Ju-87s and Ju-88s stationed in North Africa? Specifically the RLM 79/80/78 where the upper surfaces were tan with large green blotches? It seems that the size of the green blotches varried from fairly large to pretty small and the spacing from very close to fairly spread out.

I'm guessing this was more often than not a field application which would explain the variety.

Oh, and I am NOT referring to the tan camouflage applied over 70/71 schemes just to be clear.

Thanks.

Tory
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Regards
Peter
www.petersplanes.com
Last edited by pbhawkin on March 29th, 2012, 2:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
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