Is there a rear fuselage tank in a Seafire F MK 17 n/t

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Is there a rear fuselage tank in a Seafire F MK 17 n/t

Joined: March 1st, 2005, 8:37 pm

April 17th, 2012, 9:30 pm #1

nm
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Joined: March 1st, 2004, 7:55 pm

April 17th, 2012, 10:01 pm #2

n/t
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Joined: March 1st, 2005, 8:37 pm

April 17th, 2012, 10:09 pm #3

nm
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Joined: December 9th, 2009, 11:45 pm

April 17th, 2012, 10:47 pm #4

nm
true that the A.P. shows a fuel tank, many were removed once the war was over, since they affected the aircraft's behaviour so badly. The Pilot's Notes (just as with the Spitfire XVI) cautioned against any sudden manoeuvres (especially aerobatics) until the tank was empty.
On the Spitfire XVI, the tank was declared out of bounds; the FAA took rather more drastic measures, which is why so many airframes, in museums, don't display a filler neck.
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Joined: March 1st, 2005, 8:37 pm

April 17th, 2012, 11:19 pm #5

in the 50,s would the jury struts to hold the wings in the folded position be red or plain metal and is it possible they could have been made of wood.As always I am privileged to have my question answered by such an expert as your good self.
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Joined: March 1st, 2004, 7:55 pm

April 17th, 2012, 11:42 pm #6

nm
...but making an educated guess I expect it would be the same as the late mark Spits, so just aft of the pilots headrest offset on the port side.

I'll keep looking, I've got quite a few pics stashed on my backup drive.

EDIT: just saw Edgars response, he is probably far more likely to be right given his extensive knowledge, I know the XVII 'could' carry the tank, whether it was fitted or not I can't be sure, if I can find a pic with the filler cap showing I'll let you know.
Last edited by Les_J99 on April 17th, 2012, 11:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 1st, 2005, 8:37 pm

April 17th, 2012, 11:48 pm #7

nm
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Joined: August 24th, 2004, 8:51 pm

April 18th, 2012, 12:24 am #8

...but making an educated guess I expect it would be the same as the late mark Spits, so just aft of the pilots headrest offset on the port side.

I'll keep looking, I've got quite a few pics stashed on my backup drive.

EDIT: just saw Edgars response, he is probably far more likely to be right given his extensive knowledge, I know the XVII 'could' carry the tank, whether it was fitted or not I can't be sure, if I can find a pic with the filler cap showing I'll let you know.
North American that fuel tanks off the CG could be a problem.

You have to wonder, with hundreds of P-51s with built-in 85 gal fuselage tanks in service, apparently successfully, into into the mid-'50s, what the USAF knew the FAA did not.

Could it have been that, in peacetime, one simply didn't fill the pesky tanks until really needed. And properly brief the ignorant pilots, perhaps?

Joe

Average Modeler and Builder of legacy kits Beyond the Pale. Proud builder of 3' "shelf" models for over half a century; 4' for Spits.
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Joined: March 1st, 2004, 7:55 pm

April 18th, 2012, 12:36 am #9

...SOP was to run from the rear fuselage tank first in order to empty it thus restoring the C-of-G then switch to the forward tank (and wing tanks in the case of the XVII).

Don't quite understand your pointed remark about 'ignorant' pilots or its relevance to the thread, so I'll just presume your having a dig for the hell of it and ignore you.
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Joined: August 24th, 2004, 8:51 pm

April 18th, 2012, 12:44 am #10

The pilots weren't ignorant, but based on the evidence were treated as they were.

SOP was indeed to empty the off-center tank first for both aircraft. If it was SOP, why remove the bloody tank?

Joe

Average Modeler and Builder of legacy kits Beyond the Pale. Proud builder of 3' "shelf" models for over half a century; 4' for Spits.
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