Joined: July 27th, 2006, 11:17 pm

Nowadays you can't graduate high school and expect to

April 15th, 2018, 8:45 pm #71

Except the part about life getting better everywhere, including here in the US. White collar jobs are going bye-bye too. I saw this coming in about 1980 already. I said then the only way to compete against s-holes is to become one and from what I see it's happening. Thank God I'm retired.

My son tells me the Jeep's transmission is Japanese but it was built in the old Willys-Overland plant in Toledo. I did have a Canadian-built '77 Chevy once, actually I married that one, but Japan and Canada are countries whose workers are paid a living wage so I'm fine with that, that's fair trade.

Successful companies aren't successful in my opinion unless their workers are successful, that's what matters to me and I speak with my wallet. Not often lol but I do.

Thanks for the thoughts Alan.

John
find a job with a living wage. You need some type of formal training and not the underwater basket weaving type.In my case I received training in electronics. At 55 iv'e had to upgrade my training several times to stay relevant. Since I love what I do and have always had a keen interest in the new it's been easy. Unfortunately many people aren't like that and rest on their laurels and eventually drop out of the job market. Now you have our elders competing for entry level jobs with all the basket weaving degrees. Who do you think will get hired? As a country we have to get rid of the mindset that everyone has to have a college degree and promote the trades. I do very well in my chosen profession, and its a growth industry. Many of the top countries are going through the same thing we are, it'll all work out in the end I hope, but it's going to be tough sledding for alot.
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Joined: May 16th, 2005, 4:44 pm

+1

April 15th, 2018, 10:22 pm #72

it's the best choice. Sometimes.
It's another tool in the tool box, I rarel use it, but it comes in handy at times.
Builder of clean 3 footers, and the occasional 1 footer...
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:27 am

Alan is quite correct. A 4 year degree in engineering,

April 15th, 2018, 10:29 pm #73

find a job with a living wage. You need some type of formal training and not the underwater basket weaving type.In my case I received training in electronics. At 55 iv'e had to upgrade my training several times to stay relevant. Since I love what I do and have always had a keen interest in the new it's been easy. Unfortunately many people aren't like that and rest on their laurels and eventually drop out of the job market. Now you have our elders competing for entry level jobs with all the basket weaving degrees. Who do you think will get hired? As a country we have to get rid of the mindset that everyone has to have a college degree and promote the trades. I do very well in my chosen profession, and its a growth industry. Many of the top countries are going through the same thing we are, it'll all work out in the end I hope, but it's going to be tough sledding for alot.
computer science, nursing or accounting will surely help find you a job. A 4 year degree in history, conflict resolution, feminist studies, or anthropology not so much. A trade school education in HIVAC, electrical or mechanical repairs will probably do you better than a 4 year liberal arts degree. I have a degree in anthropology with a minor in geology, both subjects that I like but I also knew how to fly airplanes which I wound up doing and enjoying till retirement, although I still fly for fun.
The baby boomers parents who went through the great depression mostly wanted their kids to go to college as it looked like the way up the social and class ladder. Now, not so much coming out of a collage with a degree in history or some other liberal art or social science school and a bunch of education loan debt I think is beginning to change the paradigm.
Last edited by pat9d on April 16th, 2018, 12:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 2:26 am

My Ambroid was purchase years ago

April 15th, 2018, 10:47 pm #74

It gets stringy if it's not fresh. Even when I'm on a good roll I can't use it up fast enough.

Where did you find Ambroid, or is it old?

John
A local shop had it but his store went oob at least 5 years ago....

Cheers
Max
Cheers,
Max Bryant

"You'll Love My Wingnuts!"
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

Building trades here...

April 16th, 2018, 12:27 am #75

computer science, nursing or accounting will surely help find you a job. A 4 year degree in history, conflict resolution, feminist studies, or anthropology not so much. A trade school education in HIVAC, electrical or mechanical repairs will probably do you better than a 4 year liberal arts degree. I have a degree in anthropology with a minor in geology, both subjects that I like but I also knew how to fly airplanes which I wound up doing and enjoying till retirement, although I still fly for fun.
The baby boomers parents who went through the great depression mostly wanted their kids to go to college as it looked like the way up the social and class ladder. Now, not so much coming out of a collage with a degree in history or some other liberal art or social science school and a bunch of education loan debt I think is beginning to change the paradigm.
I'm out now but during my career saw lots of changes. Did work in factories when I was younger ended up in shopping centers. Always wondered how all the people who lost those factory jobs are supposed to go shopping in these new stores.

Still doesn't make any sense to me.

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: March 19th, 2007, 1:04 pm

Jeep is owned by Chrysler which is currently owned by Fiat, no?

April 16th, 2018, 12:32 am #76

The Chevy is a '93 pickup, 25 years old this year and runs better than ever with 240,000 miles on it.

The Jeep is a '96 Cherokee, also with over 200 on it, bought it new and it still drives like new. Kid uses it now, for work.

Did I pass?

John
And AMC was bought by Renault in the 80s, who sold the Jeep marque to Chrysler in the 90s. And in the 80s and 90s Chrysler and Mitsubishi had a manufacturing alliance. Sometime in the late 90s Daimler-Benz bought Chrysler, but they separated a couple of years before the Fiat deal. So it was indeed happening when you bought your cars, or when they were manufactured.
Not trolling you at all, but the relationships are a lot more intertwined than most people imagine, like Renault having a controlling share of Nissan. And GM and the relationship with Isuzu.
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

I care where the work is done...

April 16th, 2018, 12:37 am #77

Not even where really, but that fair wages are paid.

I'm a main street guy, not a wall street guy.

Who owns what doesn't concern me.

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: September 28th, 2006, 2:51 am

Why would you consider Poland molding exploitative?..

April 16th, 2018, 1:49 am #78

First, about off the grid, yes. No cell phone, no credit/debit cards, still write checks and use stamps to pay my bills. I buy models at a brick hobby shop with green money.

About Poland, that's a great question! Obviously I'm torn a little on that one but I understand it to be an exploitive situation. I'd love to hear some real Poles' views on this.

John
It is now evident you do not know anything about the Revell business, the plastic model industry in general, or global business at all.

Revell GmbH has the molds pressed in Poland as it is cheaper then producing them in the PRC and shipping plastic around the world for decals and boxing.

Poland is in Europe, where the vast majority of the Revell GmbH market is located. Shipping costs to the other members in Europe is the main factor. The other is the reduced risk of the Chinese running their own plastic through the Revell molds if they stay in China.

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Joined: May 20th, 2013, 12:03 am

Nope ...

April 16th, 2018, 2:16 am #79

Monogram and Revell were the best of all time. Until we got so interested in details that were made to make us less able to scratch build ourselves. Not putting anyone down but take a look at how many people do not scratch detail. When in the hay day we had to scratch everything from seat belts to flaps. A friend built an F-5e and P-51d that at the time was perfect, from Monogram, in the '80s.
...first, Revell is 'not' gone. The blame for all this
mess is the management of Hobbico who tried to bite off
more than it could chew and managed it badly.

RoG is owned by a PE firm and owns all the molds that both
Revells owned, including one can assume, the old Monogram stuff.

It also follows that the name Revell of Germany will revert to
just plain old Revell as there's no distinction necessary anymore.
I don't understand why anyone thinks something has disappeared or
that kit prices will suddenly rise because of what happened. It
also appears that the folks who ran RoG will still be running the
show. Their new 1/32 scale stuff is significantly less expensive
than their rivals and that includes shipping/distribution costs.

None of us know of course how things will progress but I don't see
any reason for a doom and gloom future for Revell kits.
...but that's just me.

I just like airplanes
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Joined: June 9th, 2008, 8:31 am

Now many of you seem to have embraced neo-isolationism

April 16th, 2018, 2:17 am #80

It makes up at least 80% of my stash but I bought very little of it brand-new. The second-hand market doesn't send a dime their way, and probably gives the seller more funds to "upgrade" HIS stash to something OTHER than Monogram.

Once they moved production to China I was done buying anything new from them. Nothing against China or the Chinese people, more of a screw-you to the greedy Americans who sent the work overseas.

Recently the thought of them going bye-bye forever made me rethink things a little so I bought four Chinese-made kits which still makes me feel a little dirty. Up til then the only China-made kits I bought were "used" so I figured any damage had already been done. Even at that I bought very few of those.

I was surprised to find a few new US-made kits, not sure if they were actually made here now or old stock...the Do-335 and Kingfisher which I bought. Also bought a Polish-made F-102 with Wisconsin ANG markings.

For anyone who's curious the four Chinese ones are a T-6, SBD and two 109's. Maybe I should've been reading the new boxes sooner, my little chance to reward good behavior and punish bad, at least in my own mind.

I'm sort of an isolationist that way but it bothers me less to buy a new Tamiya kit than a Chinese Monogram. Tamiya's an Asian outfit and always was.

Where a company is based never mattered to me, it's where the physical work is done that matters to me. Asian companies employing Asian people I understand, American companies employing Asian people is just greed. It bothers me to reward greed.

(Edit: On that note, for the same reasons, if I "must" buy a Japanese kit I prefer Hasegawa kits to Tamiya. Tamiya kits are outsourced to The Philippines, I'm guessing for cheaper labor, while Hasegawa kits are made in Japan. Greed is greed anywhere.)

I wish the new Revell owners well, and will be looking forward to see how this all develops.

John
perhaps you can get your politicians to stop invading other countries and massacring their populations.
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