Joined: March 1st, 2009, 4:06 am

HAHA...........it wasn't a test. Funny because....................

April 15th, 2018, 12:26 am #21

Hyundais, Toyotas, Nissans, etc can be manufactured in the USA, and Chevy's, Fords, Jeeps, etc can be manufactured in Mexice, maybe even China, with lots of parts made anywhere in the world. Honestly, I wasn't challenging you.
Remember the USS Liberty
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

I'm not against fair trade...

April 15th, 2018, 12:31 am #22

Just curious.........what do you drive?.................nt
I'm against people taking advantage of each other.

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

LOL yeah, ...

April 15th, 2018, 12:34 am #23

Hyundais, Toyotas, Nissans, etc can be manufactured in the USA, and Chevy's, Fords, Jeeps, etc can be manufactured in Mexice, maybe even China, with lots of parts made anywhere in the world. Honestly, I wasn't challenging you.
Pretty sure mine were built before that kinda stuff happened.

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: December 24th, 2002, 10:24 pm

"I buy based upon what is available and what I am interested in"

April 15th, 2018, 12:43 am #24

I buy my models and supplies without regard for where they are made. However, just because a product was made in China or the Philippines does not mean that someone in the U.S. where I live is not making some money or recovering some money. If I buy a Tamiya kit second hand, it was probably imported by Tamiya U.S.A., sold by an American retailer, then the owner decided to sell it on and get some of their money back from the original purchase. Half a dozen U.S. citizens at the minimum have participated in that economic chain from shippers, to stockers to retail stores and even the person selling at a loss is getting some money from their original purchase.

Our economy is way past where it was made, it is hard to buy anything in the hobby world that does not give economic benefit to people in the country where the item is purchased.

Even if my retailer is not local, I buy several times a year from Sprue Brothers, without the likes of Tamiya they would not have product to sell me.

Take revell for example and compare it to Tamiya, whether they make a revell kit in the U.S. or China it was generally not as nice of a kit to build as the Tamiya kit. I quit buying Revell in part because of quality but also their good stuff was Automotive and mainly american Muscle cars and my appetite for American muscle cars is very low. Monogram and Revell made some great car kits, but they were not to my longterm taste.

Revell and Monogram aircraft and military kits never grew on me because of their quality compared to what I could get from other companies.

I don't really care that much if Revell exists or not, I buy based upon what is available and what I am interested in. Plenty of Americans profit from my hobby purchases regardless of where the plastic is pushed through the machine or the name on the box it comes in.
That line states my modeling philosophy EXACTLY.
If it fits one of my 3 themes, and I can afford it, I will get it, no matter where it was made.

Larry
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Joined: July 28th, 2008, 3:27 am

Amen to that

April 15th, 2018, 12:52 am #25

People love to blame Wal-Mart for shutting down their favorite drug store that's been there forever. Wal-Mart didn't shut it down, we did.

John
God bless Walmart. Need a printer at 3 am or diapers at 5:54 am? How about a thermomator or No. 2 pencils? How about a Christmas present at 2 am on Christmas Eve? Walmart. I could manage without it but it makes life so much easier.
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

Now I'm curious, what themes? n/t

April 15th, 2018, 12:53 am #26

That line states my modeling philosophy EXACTLY.
If it fits one of my 3 themes, and I can afford it, I will get it, no matter where it was made.

Larry
Now I'm curious, what themes? n/t
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 5:34 am

The original Budweiser is Czech anyway

April 15th, 2018, 12:53 am #27

Budweiser are no longer American owned !! Etc ...

And I am really quite concerned about our financial and manufacturing situation with China.
It's actually good compared to the American stuff. When I buy beer, I try to support the local microbrewerys. There's quite a few in New England.
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Joined: July 29th, 2006, 1:18 am

I "helped" Dad built some Comet and Strombecker wood kits …

April 15th, 2018, 1:01 am #28

I'm guessing because you said first plastic kit.

John
… mainly by watching him build them at the kitchen table. Revell's Skyrocket was the first kit of any kind I attempted to build on my own.
Michael McMurtrey
IPMS-USA #1746
IPMS-Canada #1426
CAHS #5646
Carrollton, TX

Proud IPMS-USA Low Number Thumper!
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Joined: March 19th, 2007, 1:04 pm

It bothers ME that Budweiser is horrible beer. Sierra Nevada for me, please.

April 15th, 2018, 1:15 am #29

Budweiser are no longer American owned !! Etc ...

And I am really quite concerned about our financial and manufacturing situation with China.
Seriously, its a global economy. I drink Tecate at a Mexican restaurant and Singha in a Thai restaurant. I like a lot of English ale too.
Wine, California but also some French...when I can afford it.
Yokohama high performance tires are made in the US. Many BFG ones are not. And,in the 1970s and 80s, people were concerned with the balance of trade with Japan. There were books written about the possibility of a new war with Japan over it...the only constant is change. Even the speed of light changes depending on the media its passing through, and there's evidence it varies over time.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 7:47 pm

Detail(ing)

April 15th, 2018, 1:28 am #30

Monogram and Revell were the best of all time. Until we got so interested in details that were made to make us less able to scratch build ourselves. Not putting anyone down but take a look at how many people do not scratch detail. When in the hay day we had to scratch everything from seat belts to flaps. A friend built an F-5e and P-51d that at the time was perfect, from Monogram, in the '80s.
I understand where you're coming from, but to take your argument to it's logical conclusion, the same could said of plastic models. To tweak your quote a bit, "When in the hay day we had to carve the shapes from blocks of wood." Progress is always looked upon in both a positive and negative light. While there's nothing wrong with having to create your own details, many modelers don't have the skill to do that. Hence, the OOB category at contests. There is also the time consideration. Life is very busy these days. I want to be able to build as many models as I can with good detail. If I had to detail every single model, I wouldn't get near the production I'm able to. Same goes for engineering/fit. I love the Monogram F-14. I've built near 100 of them. But I'd take a Tamiya kit over the Monogram any day of the week because it simply falls together with literally no need for any putty. I love where we're at in modeling right now, and while I nostalgically will miss Revell/Monogram, the hobby really isn't that worse off without them. I liken it to Frog and Lindberg going away. Are they really missed except to relive our childhoods?
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