Joined: February 25th, 2006, 4:29 am

Could you please identify the line...

April 14th, 2018, 10:25 pm #11

I've been trying to think more globally, but greed is greed anywhere. I guess that's what I'm against.

John
...that separates greed from a reasonable profit on investment in a competitive market?

Thanks,
Bruce
Last edited by Neptune48 on April 14th, 2018, 10:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

Yeah that's a tough one...

April 14th, 2018, 10:30 pm #12

People love to blame Wal-Mart for shutting down their favorite drug store that's been there forever. Wal-Mart didn't shut it down, we did.

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: May 20th, 2013, 12:03 am

Sure ...

April 14th, 2018, 10:31 pm #13

...that separates greed from a reasonable profit on investment in a competitive market?

Thanks,
Bruce
...when the quest for ever increasing shareholder value
overides the quest for ever increasing product quality.

I've seen it happen.

I just like airplanes
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

Thoughtful and honest...

April 14th, 2018, 10:39 pm #14

I buy my models and supplies without regard for where they are made. However, just because a product was made in China or the Philippines does not mean that someone in the U.S. where I live is not making some money or recovering some money. If I buy a Tamiya kit second hand, it was probably imported by Tamiya U.S.A., sold by an American retailer, then the owner decided to sell it on and get some of their money back from the original purchase. Half a dozen U.S. citizens at the minimum have participated in that economic chain from shippers, to stockers to retail stores and even the person selling at a loss is getting some money from their original purchase.

Our economy is way past where it was made, it is hard to buy anything in the hobby world that does not give economic benefit to people in the country where the item is purchased.

Even if my retailer is not local, I buy several times a year from Sprue Brothers, without the likes of Tamiya they would not have product to sell me.

Take revell for example and compare it to Tamiya, whether they make a revell kit in the U.S. or China it was generally not as nice of a kit to build as the Tamiya kit. I quit buying Revell in part because of quality but also their good stuff was Automotive and mainly american Muscle cars and my appetite for American muscle cars is very low. Monogram and Revell made some great car kits, but they were not to my longterm taste.

Revell and Monogram aircraft and military kits never grew on me because of their quality compared to what I could get from other companies.

I don't really care that much if Revell exists or not, I buy based upon what is available and what I am interested in. Plenty of Americans profit from my hobby purchases regardless of where the plastic is pushed through the machine or the name on the box it comes in.
Even though I completely disagree I can't argue with any of it.

Thank You.

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

Their real product is stock...

April 14th, 2018, 10:42 pm #15

...when the quest for ever increasing shareholder value
overides the quest for ever increasing product quality.

I've seen it happen.
Proven every time someone outsources "to compete" and the prices don't change.

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: May 20th, 2005, 3:39 am

Only person to blame is us...

April 14th, 2018, 10:43 pm #16

It makes up at least 80% of my stash but I bought very little of it brand-new. The second-hand market doesn't send a dime their way, and probably gives the seller more funds to "upgrade" HIS stash to something OTHER than Monogram.

Once they moved production to China I was done buying anything new from them. Nothing against China or the Chinese people, more of a screw-you to the greedy Americans who sent the work overseas.

Recently the thought of them going bye-bye forever made me rethink things a little so I bought four Chinese-made kits which still makes me feel a little dirty. Up til then the only China-made kits I bought were "used" so I figured any damage had already been done. Even at that I bought very few of those.

I was surprised to find a few new US-made kits, not sure if they were actually made here now or old stock...the Do-335 and Kingfisher which I bought. Also bought a Polish-made F-102 with Wisconsin ANG markings.

For anyone who's curious the four Chinese ones are a T-6, SBD and two 109's. Maybe I should've been reading the new boxes sooner, my little chance to reward good behavior and punish bad, at least in my own mind.

I'm sort of an isolationist that way but it bothers me less to buy a new Tamiya kit than a Chinese Monogram. Tamiya's an Asian outfit and always was.

Where a company is based never mattered to me, it's where the physical work is done that matters to me. Asian companies employing Asian people I understand, American companies employing Asian people is just greed. It bothers me to reward greed.

(Edit: On that note, for the same reasons, if I "must" buy a Japanese kit I prefer Hasegawa kits to Tamiya. Tamiya kits are outsourced to The Philippines, I'm guessing for cheaper labor, while Hasegawa kits are made in Japan. Greed is greed anywhere.)

I wish the new Revell owners well, and will be looking forward to see how this all develops.

John
Monogram and Revell were the best of all time. Until we got so interested in details that were made to make us less able to scratch build ourselves. Not putting anyone down but take a look at how many people do not scratch detail. When in the hay day we had to scratch everything from seat belts to flaps. A friend built an F-5e and P-51d that at the time was perfect, from Monogram, in the '80s.
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

I miss those days too but...

April 14th, 2018, 10:49 pm #17

They're alive and well on my bench!

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

And before Monogram...

April 14th, 2018, 11:13 pm #18

Monogram and Revell were the best of all time. Until we got so interested in details that were made to make us less able to scratch build ourselves. Not putting anyone down but take a look at how many people do not scratch detail. When in the hay day we had to scratch everything from seat belts to flaps. A friend built an F-5e and P-51d that at the time was perfect, from Monogram, in the '80s.
A cockpit was a flat surface with a pilot figure from the shoulders up or a hole and wheelwells were a hole, if you were lucky. To this day cockpit and wheelwell detail of any quality whatsoever is still a bonus for me.

I look for a good overall shape and Monogram always gets that pretty right. A good overall impression of the real thing. Hawk was good at that too.

John


109's are red
Spitfires are blue
My kits aren't so old
It's yours that are new.

190's are black
Zeroes are yellow
It's good to be back
Among ye good fellow!
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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Joined: March 1st, 2009, 4:06 am

Just curious.........what do you drive?.................nt

April 15th, 2018, 12:03 am #19

It makes up at least 80% of my stash but I bought very little of it brand-new. The second-hand market doesn't send a dime their way, and probably gives the seller more funds to "upgrade" HIS stash to something OTHER than Monogram.

Once they moved production to China I was done buying anything new from them. Nothing against China or the Chinese people, more of a screw-you to the greedy Americans who sent the work overseas.

Recently the thought of them going bye-bye forever made me rethink things a little so I bought four Chinese-made kits which still makes me feel a little dirty. Up til then the only China-made kits I bought were "used" so I figured any damage had already been done. Even at that I bought very few of those.

I was surprised to find a few new US-made kits, not sure if they were actually made here now or old stock...the Do-335 and Kingfisher which I bought. Also bought a Polish-made F-102 with Wisconsin ANG markings.

For anyone who's curious the four Chinese ones are a T-6, SBD and two 109's. Maybe I should've been reading the new boxes sooner, my little chance to reward good behavior and punish bad, at least in my own mind.

I'm sort of an isolationist that way but it bothers me less to buy a new Tamiya kit than a Chinese Monogram. Tamiya's an Asian outfit and always was.

Where a company is based never mattered to me, it's where the physical work is done that matters to me. Asian companies employing Asian people I understand, American companies employing Asian people is just greed. It bothers me to reward greed.

(Edit: On that note, for the same reasons, if I "must" buy a Japanese kit I prefer Hasegawa kits to Tamiya. Tamiya kits are outsourced to The Philippines, I'm guessing for cheaper labor, while Hasegawa kits are made in Japan. Greed is greed anywhere.)

I wish the new Revell owners well, and will be looking forward to see how this all develops.

John
Just curious.........what do you drive?.................nt
Remember the USS Liberty
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Joined: March 22nd, 2018, 7:25 pm

A Chevy and a Jeep...

April 15th, 2018, 12:20 am #20

The Chevy is a '93 pickup, 25 years old this year and runs better than ever with 240,000 miles on it.

The Jeep is a '96 Cherokee, also with over 200 on it, bought it new and it still drives like new. Kid uses it now, for work.

Did I pass?

John
I'm not retro, my stash got old. ~John Krukowski
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