How to get a clean line of paint between deck and superstructure?

How to get a clean line of paint between deck and superstructure?

Joined: March 10th, 2005, 5:37 pm

June 30th, 2011, 7:13 pm #1

this reminds me of how just about impossible it is for me to get a clean line when I tried to paint a room in my house that has plaster walls - not a smooth line anywhere...and the line against the ceiling is more than wobbly. the only way to fix it is to add trim.

but seriously..with the wood grain deck meeting smooth steel, whats the best way to get a clean line? paint the grey first, spend the evening masking, spraying a clear coat to seal against leaks under the tape, and then paint the wood deck?

How do you all do it?

Craig
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

June 30th, 2011, 8:48 pm #2

I have done it a couple ways. In some kits I paint the metal vertical parts, mask them and then paint the deck, and in others I paint the deck, mask it and paint the structures. I do a lot of smaller kits and also hand paint the decks and its easy to get a sharp edge that way.
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walaroo
walaroo

June 30th, 2011, 11:14 pm #3

this reminds me of how just about impossible it is for me to get a clean line when I tried to paint a room in my house that has plaster walls - not a smooth line anywhere...and the line against the ceiling is more than wobbly. the only way to fix it is to add trim.

but seriously..with the wood grain deck meeting smooth steel, whats the best way to get a clean line? paint the grey first, spend the evening masking, spraying a clear coat to seal against leaks under the tape, and then paint the wood deck?

How do you all do it?

Craig
I have had some success with using and airbrush and just making sure that I keep the spray as close to a right angle to what I was painting as possible. You may have to do a little clean up with a brush. Sometimes the effect seems to look more realistic, in my opinion.
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Joined: May 29th, 2005, 1:59 am

June 30th, 2011, 11:22 pm #4

this reminds me of how just about impossible it is for me to get a clean line when I tried to paint a room in my house that has plaster walls - not a smooth line anywhere...and the line against the ceiling is more than wobbly. the only way to fix it is to add trim.

but seriously..with the wood grain deck meeting smooth steel, whats the best way to get a clean line? paint the grey first, spend the evening masking, spraying a clear coat to seal against leaks under the tape, and then paint the wood deck?

How do you all do it?

Craig
I usually will paint the ship's basic hull/superstructure color first, then mask that part and then paint the deck. I've done it that way with planked deck as well as metal decked 1/700 and 1/350 scale ships. This picture shows the masking and painted deck on the Hasegawa 1/350 Mutsu, using 3M Painters Tape. Smaller deck parts are then hand painted the appropriate hull color.



Even a ship this size doesn't take that long to mask. Besides, if you're going to spend years looking at the finished product, might as well spend a few extra minutes to do the painting right.
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Joined: February 18th, 2006, 2:30 pm

July 1st, 2011, 2:38 am #5

this reminds me of how just about impossible it is for me to get a clean line when I tried to paint a room in my house that has plaster walls - not a smooth line anywhere...and the line against the ceiling is more than wobbly. the only way to fix it is to add trim.

but seriously..with the wood grain deck meeting smooth steel, whats the best way to get a clean line? paint the grey first, spend the evening masking, spraying a clear coat to seal against leaks under the tape, and then paint the wood deck?

How do you all do it?

Craig
All the gents point out similiar methods. Each is good and like ALL Modeling techniques, you get into a "groove" once you build up momentum.

I'm a 1/32 builder and doing ships is a big shift of gears, but EASY and worth the results. Mask vertical and paint horizonatal last, and minor touch up works for me.

For small deck detail I paint those first and mask, touch up around those as required.

good luck, I'm sure you'll get it fine.
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Cody Baxter
Cody Baxter

July 1st, 2011, 12:06 pm #6

this reminds me of how just about impossible it is for me to get a clean line when I tried to paint a room in my house that has plaster walls - not a smooth line anywhere...and the line against the ceiling is more than wobbly. the only way to fix it is to add trim.

but seriously..with the wood grain deck meeting smooth steel, whats the best way to get a clean line? paint the grey first, spend the evening masking, spraying a clear coat to seal against leaks under the tape, and then paint the wood deck?

How do you all do it?

Craig
I use this method:
http://mikeashey.com/SHIP%20ARTICLE%20P ... D-DECK.pdf
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Bob Melvin
Bob Melvin

July 11th, 2011, 4:47 pm #7

this reminds me of how just about impossible it is for me to get a clean line when I tried to paint a room in my house that has plaster walls - not a smooth line anywhere...and the line against the ceiling is more than wobbly. the only way to fix it is to add trim.

but seriously..with the wood grain deck meeting smooth steel, whats the best way to get a clean line? paint the grey first, spend the evening masking, spraying a clear coat to seal against leaks under the tape, and then paint the wood deck?

How do you all do it?

Craig
It seems pretty fundamental, but I think it bears saying that one of the most important aspects of getting your paint work to look the very best it can, whether it be the question in point, or just how to get the best results on your hulls. Especially if you are using an airbrush, practice, practice, practice! The more you learn about the capabilities of your airbrush, how best to get the most out of those capabilities, the better your paint jobs will be. Even more important is to get as utterly comfortable with using your airbrush as possible. The more you have to think about what you are doing, the more stilted your results will be. But if you can handle that thing as deftly as your knife and fork at dinner, which only comes with practice, the less your focus will be on the mechanics of using the instrument and more of it on the results you are obtaining and how to accomplish what you want to achieve. I would suggest to anybody not as comfortable with their airbrush as they are with their knife and fork to buy a cheap kit and use it as a test piece to practice, practice, practice on. Its worth taking time out from actually building to develop these skills.

Bob
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